1

I've seen similar questions regarding this error, but all of them rails-related. I'm not using rails; I'm working on a local rake task that reads from a yaml file and then does stuff with the data. I'd rather not install bundler for this (the solutions for the similar rails issues suggest prepending with bundle exec), since this script is simple and thus shouldn't need it.

Here's the simplified code, (which gets the same error as the code I'm working on):

require 'FileUtils'
require 'yaml'

SOME_FILE = "#{Dir.pwd}/some_file.yaml"

task default: :foo

task :foo do
  bar = File.open(SOME_FILE) { |yf| YAML::load( yf ) }
  bar.each {|k,v| puts k}
end

And here's the list of errors:

/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:93: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::OPT_TABLE
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:93: warning: previous definition of OPT_TABLE was here
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:1272: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::Entry_::S_IF_DOOR
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:1272: warning: previous definition of S_IF_DOOR was here
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:1535: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::Entry_::DIRECTORY_TERM
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:1535: warning: previous definition of DIRECTORY_TERM was here
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:1537: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::Entry_::SYSCASE
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:1537: warning: previous definition of SYSCASE was here
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:1656: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::LOW_METHODS
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:1656: warning: previous definition of LOW_METHODS was here
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/FileUtils.rb:1662: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::METHODS
/Users/jpalmieri/.rbenv/versions/2.0.0-p353/lib/ruby/2.0.0/fileutils.rb:1662: warning: previous definition of METHODS was here

The script will run fine despite the warnings; the above code would puts the keys as expected, right after the warnings.

5

This warning shows up when I write require 'FileUtils'. If I write require 'fileutils' (all lower case) warning disappears.

This link may be helpful explaining the behavior. I think in essence ruby thinks FileUtils and fileutils are different modules, therefore imports it twice. Then the redeclaration of constants give warning messages.

2

Wanted to answer this clearly (two years after it was asked) in case anyone wanders in here.

First, note that require in Ruby does not load a Module, as in the object FileUtils that is in memory. It loads the file "fileutils.rb" from your hard drive. The ".rb" is omitted by convention but you could write require 'fileutils.rb'.

The purpose of require in Ruby is to load a file only once, as opposed to load which will reload the file every time it is used. The way require avoids loading a file multiple times is by recording the filename argument and skipping it if it if that filename is passed again.

When you first require a file, Ruby responds with true to indicate that it was loaded. If you require the same file again it will return false to indicate that it was already loaded:

> require 'fileutils'
=> true
> require 'fileutils'
=> false

Since the filename stored by require is case-sensitive, but the actual file lookup is not, fileutils.rb will still be found if you use caps in the name:

> require 'FileUtils'
=> true

But if something in your Ruby program already loaded that file without caps (in your case "yaml.rb" probably requires "fileutils" as well) you will reload the file and may see warnings:

> require 'fileutils'
=> true
> require 'FileUtils'
/bin/ruby/lib/ruby/2.3.0/FileUtils.rb:96: warning: already initialized constant FileUtils::OPT_TABLE
etc.

By convention Ruby files should be named in lowercase with underscores, e.g. "my_class.rb", so you would always use require 'my_class'.

Things get a little trickier if you are requiring using absolute or relative paths, e.g. require 'special_classes/my_class'. I suggest reading about require_relative and the Ruby load path ($LOAD_PATH).

  • And a year later, this sure comes in handy. I searched my project dir for "fileutils" and sure enough one of my files required FileUtils while the others required fileutils. Thanks!!! – Jonathan Tuzman Dec 6 '18 at 21:55
1

I found that these warnings don't appear and the script runs perfectly if I simply comment out or remove line 1 of my original code (require 'FileUtils'). Although I haven't browsed the code for Rake, it must already include FileUtils (which makes sense).

For the sake of completeness, here is my revised code (note that I removed the require 'FileUtils' line:

require 'yaml'

SOME_FILE = "#{Dir.pwd}/some_file.yaml"

task default: :foo

task :foo do
  bar = File.open(SOME_FILE) { |yf| YAML::load( yf ) }
  bar.each {|k,v| puts k}
end
  • in my case zip already includes FileUtils, I thought it that in ruby was used something similar to C, to avoid multiple inclusion? – Snake Sanders May 19 '17 at 11:16
1

I was having the same issue with Travis and the problem was that I forgot to use bundle exec rake db:setup instead of rake db:setup. Hope it helps someone :)

1

I solved this similar issue when I list my gem items which named "fileutils" has two versions

fileutils (1.1.0, default: 1.0.2)

then I run

sudo gem uninstall fileutils -v 1.1.0

and solved

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