13

A boost-asio SSL/TLS TCP socket is implemented as an ssl::stream over a tcp::socket:

boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket> ssl_socket;

In the TLS protocol, a cryptographically secure shutdown involves parties exchanging close_notify messages. Simply closing the lowest layer may make the session vulnerable to a truncation attack.

In boost asio ssl async_shutdown always finishes with an error? @Tanner Sansbury describes the SSL shutdown process in detail with a number of scenarios and proposes using an async_shutdown followed by an async_write to disconnect an SSL stream prior to closing the socket:

ssl_socket.async_shutdown(...);
const char buffer[] = "";
async_write(ssl_socket, buffer, [](...) { ssl_socket.close(); }) 

Performing an async_shutdown on an ssl::stream sends an SSL close_notify message and waits for a response from the other end. The purpose of writing to the stream after the async_shutdown is to be notified when async_shutdown has sent the close_notify so that the socket can be closed without waiting for the response. However, in the current (1.59) version of boost the call to async_write fails...

In How to gracefully shutdown a boost asio ssl client? @maxschlepzig proposes shutting down receiver of the underlying TCP socket:

ssl_socket.lowest_layer()::shutdown(tcp::socket::shutdown_receive);

This produces a short read error, and async_shutdown is called when it's detected in the error handler:

// const boost::system::error_code &ec
if (ec.category() == asio::error::get_ssl_category() &&
  ec.value()    == ERR_PACK(ERR_LIB_SSL, 0, SSL_R_SHORT_READ))
{
  // -> not a real error:
  do_ssl_async_shutdown();
}

Or cancelling the read/write operations on the socket and then calling SSL async shutdown, i.e.:

boost::system::error_code ec;
ssl_socket.cancel(ec);
ssl_socket.async_shutdown([](...) { ssl_socket.close(); };

I'm currently using this last method since it works with the current version of boost.

What is the correct/best way to securely disconnect a boost-asio SSL socket?

2
  • 1
    It depends. If you've received a close_notify you aren't obliged to send one.
    – user207421
    Aug 17, 2015 at 10:33
  • 2
    Yes you are, but you are not required to wait to receive a close_notify after you have sent one.
    – kenba
    Aug 17, 2015 at 10:50

3 Answers 3

8

To securely disconnect, perform a shutdown operation and then close the underlying transport once shutdown has complete. Hence, the method you are currently using will perform a secure disconnect:

boost::system::error_code ec;
ssl_socket.cancel(ec);
ssl_socket.async_shutdown([](...) { ssl_socket.close(); };

Be aware that the current async_shutdown operation will be considered complete when either:

  • A close_notify has been received by the remote peer.
  • The remote peer closes the socket.
  • The operation has been cancelled.

Hence, if resources are bound to the lifetime of the socket or connection, then these resources will remain alive waiting for the remote peer to take action or until the operation is cancelled locally. However, waiting for a close_notify response is not required for a secure shutdown. If resources are bound to the connection, and locally the connection is considered dead upon sending a shutdown, then it may be worthwhile to not wait for the remote peer to take action:

ssl_socket.async_shutdown(...);
const char buffer[] = "";
async_write(ssl_socket, boost::asio::buffer(buffer),
    [](...) { ssl_socket.close(); })

When a client sends a close_notify message, the client guarantees that the client will not send additional data across the secure connection. In essence, the async_write() is being used to detect when the client has sent a close_notify, and within the completion handler, will close the underlying transport, causing the async_shutdown() to complete with boost::asio::error::operation_aborted. As noted in the linked answer, the async_write() operation is expected to fail.

... as the write side of PartyA's SSL stream has closed, the async_write() operation will fail with an SSL error indicating the protocol has been shutdown.

if ((error.category() == boost::asio::error::get_ssl_category())
     && (SSL_R_PROTOCOL_IS_SHUTDOWN == ERR_GET_REASON(error.value())))
{
  ssl_stream.lowest_layer().close();
}

The failed async_write() operation will then explicitly close the underlying transport, causing the async_shutdown() operation that is waiting for PartyB's close_notify to be cancelled.

7
  • 1
    Thank you @Tanner, I totally agree that once a client has sent a close notify it shouldn't have to wait for a response and I was using an async_shutdown followed by an async_write as you've described here and in your (excellent) linked answer Unfortunately, using the boost 1.59, the call to async_write now fails by crashing in engine.ipp instead of calling the callback with SSL_R_PROTOCOL_IS_SHUTDOWN! So how best disconnect the SSL socket and not crash?
    – kenba
    Aug 17, 2015 at 16:52
  • 1
    @kenba I will try to find some time to investigate it. Is the application guaranteeing that all asynchronous operations are being performed within the same implicit or explicit strand? Often times, crashes with Boost.Asio SSL are the result of violating concurrency requirement. Aug 17, 2015 at 17:13
  • Thank you @Tanner it would be great if you could find the cause. The application in question is single threaded so there are no concurrency issues.
    – kenba
    Aug 17, 2015 at 18:02
  • 5
    @Vinnie The intention of initiating an async_write() with an outstanding async_shutdown() is to detect when the local write-side of the stream has shutdown, allowing one to free resources without having to wait for the remote peer to shutdown their side of the ssl stream. If one waits for the async_shutdown to complete, then async_write would no longer be necessary. Apr 13, 2016 at 0:44
  • 4
    I hit the problem mentioned by kenba where there was a crash in engine.ipp, it was only occurred when multiple threads were running ioservice::run. It also required 32 threads to hit it. As Tanner Sansbury indicated it was due to violating the SSL concurrency issue. The fix was to strand the shutdown and the write: ssl_socket.async_shutdown(strand_.wrap(..) ); const char buffer[] = ""; async_write(ssl_socket_, boost::asio::buffer(buffer), strand_.wrap(....)); - hope this helps someone Dec 19, 2016 at 1:48
2

I'm probably late to answer this but I want to report my experience. This solution so far (using boost 1.78) did not produce any visible error on the client nor the server:

// sock type is boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket>

sock->shutdown(ec);       

sock->lowest_layer().shutdown(boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket::shutdown_both, ec);

sock->lowest_layer().cancel(ec);

sock->lowest_layer().close();

Sandbox server with: openssl s_server -cert server.crt -key server.key -4 -debug

With this solution the server gets this after the sock->shutdown(ec).

read from 0x55e5dff8c960 [0x55e5dff810f8] (19 bytes => 19 (0x13))
0000 - 44 bc 11 5b a9 b4 ee 51-48 e0 18 f7 99 a7 a8 a9   D..[...QH.......
0010 - 21 1a 60                                          !.`
DONE
shutting down SSL
CONNECTION CLOSED

Before I was using this code (used for both plain TCP and ssl socket)

sock->lowest_layer().shutdown(boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket::shutdown_both, ec);

sock->lowest_layer().cancel(ec);

sock->lowest_layer().close();

The old code, when leveraging ssl socket, produced this error on the server:

read from 0x55eb3d40b430 [0x55eb3d423513] (5 bytes => 0 (0x0))
ERROR
shutting down SSL
CONNECTION CLOSED

As mentioned before, to avoid this behavior a close_notify should be sent out by the client using ssl::stream::async_shutdown or ssl::stream::shutdown

The trick of async_write() could be useful in case you want to leverage the async_shutdown() function instead of the synchronous shutdown()

1
  • Did you test this with a server that does not shutdown the connection properly? Oct 26, 2022 at 17:23
1

I just want to add my response in case it helps people working with newer versions of Boost. In my case, I'm using Boost 1.82.0 and I've implemented the first of the options proposed by @tanner-sansbury where a combination of ssl_stream.async_shutdown and ssl_stream.lowest_layer()->close() are used.

The code for the client and server side look identical (only the logging messages and optionally variable name change):

tls_socket.lowest_layer().cancel();  // Cancels all ongoing operations
// Sends a 'close_notify' message to the server
tls_socket_ptr_.async_shutdown([this](const boost::system::error_code& ec)
    {           
        timer_->cancel();
        if (!ec)
        {
            std::cout << "CloseSocket - Cleanly shutdown SSL stream. Now we'll shutdown the socket..." << std::endl;
            ClosePlainTCPSocket();
        }
        else
        {
            std::cout << "BrainClient::CloseSocket - Something went wrong while shutting down SSL stream! Exitting anyway..." << std::endl;
        }
    });


void ClosePlainTCPSocket()
{
    boost::system::error_code tcp_socket_shutdown_ec;
    tls_socket.lowest_layer().shutdown(
        boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket::shutdown_both, tcp_socket_shutdown_ec);

    if (!tcp_socket_shutdown_ec)
    {
        std::cout << "BrainClient::ClosePlainTCPSocket - TCP socket was successfully shutdown, closing socket..." << std::endl;
        tls_socket_ptr_.lowest_layer().close();
    }
}

Additionally, I've added a boost::asio::steady_timer after the code above so I don't wait forever for the async_shutdown to finish. If the timer times out I report an error and try to close the server end synchronously with shutdown().

Pardon me if there's any bug in the code since I've taken only part of my code to simplify the example as much as possible.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.