In this question How to pass a querystring or route parameter to AWS Lambda from Amazon API Gateway

shows how to map query string params to AWS lambda using API gateway. I would like to do the same but mapping POST values instead of query-string. I tried:

{
    "values": "$input.params()"
}

but did not work, I don't see the actual form data. BTW I am posting using:

application/x-www-form-urlencoded

I get my response from my lambda function, so I know it is invoking lambda fine, but my problem is that I don't see the POST params anywhere. I can;t figure out how to map them. I dump all I get on Lambda side and here it is:

 {"values":"{path={}, querystring={}, header={Accept=*/*, Accept-Encoding=gzip, deflate, Accept-Language=en-US,en;q=0.8, Cache-Control=no-cache, CloudFront-Forwarded-Proto=https, CloudFront-Is-Desktop-Viewer=true, CloudFront-Is-Mobile-Viewer=false, CloudFront-Is-SmartTV-Viewer=false, CloudFront-Is-Tablet-Viewer=false, CloudFront-Viewer-Country=US, Content-Type=application/x-www-form-urlencoded, Origin=chrome-extension://fhbjgbiflinjbdggehcddcbncdddomop, Postman-Token=7ba28698-8753-fcb1-1f48-66750ce12ade, Via=1.1 6ba5553fa41dafcdc0e74d152f3a7a75.cloudfront.net (CloudFront), X-Amz-Cf-Id=sc8C7dLcW0BHYopztNYrnddC0hXyFdBzHv0O9aWU1gKhd1D_J2HF3w==, X-Forwarded-For=50.196.93.57, 54.239.140.62, X-Forwarded-Port=443, X-Forwarded-Proto=https}}"}
up vote 46 down vote accepted

Good answer by r7kamura. Additionally Here's an example of an understandable and robust mapping template for application/x-www-form-urlencoded that works for all cases (assuming POST):

{
    "data": {
        #foreach( $token in $input.path('$').split('&') )
            #set( $keyVal = $token.split('=') )
            #set( $keyValSize = $keyVal.size() )
            #if( $keyValSize >= 1 )
                #set( $key = $util.urlDecode($keyVal[0]) )
                #if( $keyValSize >= 2 )
                    #set( $val = $util.urlDecode($keyVal[1]) )
                #else
                    #set( $val = '' )
                #end
                "$key": "$val"#if($foreach.hasNext),#end
            #end
        #end
    }
}

It would transform an input of

name=Marcus&email=email%40example.com&message=

into

{
    "data": {
                "name": "Marcus",
                "email": "email@example.com",
                "message": ""
    }
}

A Lambda handler could use it like this (this one returns all input data):

module.exports.handler = function(event, context, cb) {
  return cb(null, {
    data: event.data
  });
};
  • 3
    Man, not even a single upvote, this works beautifully for me, thanks! – ObjectiveTruth Jul 23 '16 at 7:23
  • 1
    worked perfectly. Pulled my hair in last couple of days, trying to load facebook canvas app using aws. Nice job @Marcus – Rukshan Dangalla Sep 26 '16 at 16:27
  • Hello! I'm trying to use this solution for and c# Dot.Net Core Lambda integretion so far the mapping lets the request pass through to the lambda. But my Body is always null. I've tried building a model that fits with the parameter of the form but to no avail. If anyone succeeded using this solution with c# any help would be apreciated. – Lorien Jun 18 '17 at 16:50
  • Why do we need #if($foreach.hasNext),#end? – Vitaly Zdanevich May 6 at 14:19

You can convert any request body data into valid JSON format by configuring the mapping templates in the integration settings so that AWS Lambda can receive it.

Currently it seems Amazon API Gateway does not support application/x-www-form-urlencoded officially yet, but avilewin posted a solution to do that on the AWS forums. In the mapping templates you can use Velocity Template Language (VTL), so what you need to do is to configure mapping templates that convert application/x-www-form-urlencoded format into valid JSON format. Of course this is a dirty solution, but I think it's the only way to do that for now.

You can convert the params into JSON with a API gateway template: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/thread.jspa?messageID=673012&tstart=0#673012

Or you may do this in the lambda function itself using QueryString parser pacakge: https://www.npmjs.com/package/qs

var qs = require('qs');
var obj = qs.parse('a=c');  // { a: 'c' } 

If Amazon adds built-in support for such feature, I will use that but until then I personally prefer the second way because it's cleaner and easier to debug if something goes wrong.

Update July 2017:

You may use proxy integration which supports it by default: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/apigateway/latest/developerguide/api-gateway-create-api-as-simple-proxy-for-lambda.html

If you enable Lambda Proxy Integration enter image description here

The POST body will be available from:

event['body']['param']

GET parameters and headers will also be available via

event['pathParameters']['param1']
event["queryStringParameters"]['queryparam1']
event['requestContext']['identity']['userAgent']
event['requestContext']['identity']['sourceIP']

I implemented an API with POST requests where Content-Type was application/x-www-form-urlencoded. If you're just interested in getting a long querystring of values similar to GET requests, then use this mapping syntax.

{
    "body": "$input.body"
}

Note, you can add other mappings too... I left that out to address the original problem.

Here's a blog tutorial that I used when originally implementing my API. My lambda function then parses the querystring passes the data onto other processes.

I found a really simple solution I think it is worth to share, since it took me a few time to find this minimal working code.

If you have a common form, that send data with content type application/x-www-form-urlencoded, just flag "Lambda proxy integration", then you will find encoded form data in event.body which can be parsed with Node.js querystring native module.

const querystring = require('querystring')

function handler (event, context, callback) {
  // Read form data.
  const { user, pass } = querystring.parse(event.body)

  // Follows your code to handle request.
}

Extending @markus-whybrow answer:

{
        #foreach( $token in $input.path('$').split('&') )
            #set( $keyVal = $token.split('=') )
            #set( $keyValSize = $keyVal.size() )
            #if( $keyValSize >= 1 )
                #set( $key = $util.urlDecode($keyVal[0]) )
                #if( $keyValSize >= 2 )
                    #set( $val = $util.urlDecode($keyVal[1]) )
                #else
                    #set( $val = '' )
                #end
                "$key": "$util.escapeJavaScript($val)"#if($foreach.hasNext),#end
            #end
        #end
    }

This gets rid of "data" and also fixes a case if you have a double-quote in one of your values.

  • This worked the best for me.. thanks Mark – Vamsi Challa Dec 10 at 10:38

This works with lambda integration. Assuming your POST request body is e.g.

{
   "name" : "Hello",
   "address" : "Cool place" 
}

You can access it like so :

if (event.body !== null && event.body !== undefined) {
   let body = JSON.parse(event.body)
   let name = body.name;
   let address = body.address;
}

More info here : http://docs.aws.amazon.com/apigateway/latest/developerguide/api-gateway-create-api-as-simple-proxy-for-lambda.html

Simple function that returns ordered dictionary of posted values:

import urllib
from collections import OrderedDict
postdata = ''

def GetPostData(body):
    #postdata = OrderedDict()
    postdata = {}
    for items in body.split('&'):
        vals = items.split('=')
        postdata[vals[0]] = urllib.parse.unquote(vals[1])
    return postdata

#Testing it out:
#Assume you get body from event['body'] or body = event.get['body']
body = 'text=This%20works%20really%20well%21%245123%21%403%2146t5%40%2341&anotherkey=isawesome23412%201%21%403%21%40312'

postdata = GetPostData(body)
print(postdata['text'])
#returns 'This works really well!$5123!@3!46t5@#41'
print(postdata['anotherkey'])
#returns 'isawesome23412 1!@3!@312'

To avoid a key error when a posted items is missing, you should use value = postdata.get('') instead, as value will be None if the key is not present.

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