3

I'm trying to re-use some code that I've already written but often need to re-execute for various projects (IE I'd like to apply some Object-Oriented principles to my R code). I know that a framework exists for publishing new packages on CRAN, but the code I have isn't something that would be valuable for other parties.

Essentially I'd like to either create my own local packages and reference them using a require() call or at the very least call functions that I've saved in separate .r files as-needed.

I've searched around online and found several lengthy articles about creating packages and compiling them using RTools (I'm on a Windows OS) but since I'm not writing C this seems overkill for my simple purposes. To offer an example of what I'm referring to, I have a script to remove unwanted characters from string data that I constantly need to copy/paste into new scripts; I don't want to do this and would prefer to just do something like require(myFunction).

Is there a simple way to solve this problem or am I best served by grabbing RTools and compiling my custom functions locally?

  • 1
    If making a package is not required, you can take the quick and dirty approach and just make a R script with your functions and source() that file. – Helix123 Aug 17 '15 at 22:35
  • 2
    Packages are precisely the solution to copying and pasting code from script to script. Take the plunge, you'll never look back and you'll wonder how you ever managed without them. – joran Aug 17 '15 at 22:40
  • 1
    source() or create a package – Alex W Aug 17 '15 at 22:51
  • Thanks guys. I did look at the source() function a bit last night. I think that would be a good light-weight solution. I'm afraid of how that would scale overtime; I think I'll follow Joran's advice and take the plunge! – Sevyns Aug 18 '15 at 14:54
3

Creating an R package is actually super easy. The link from Alex is how I started my first package. Here's a slightly simplified version I have to give my students. (NB: full credit to Hilary Parker, the author of the original blogpost).

First install devtools and roxygen:

install.packages("devtools")
library("devtools")
install.packages("roxygen2")
library("roxygen2")

Make a new directory for your functions:

setwd("/path/to/parentdirectory")
create("mypackage")

Add your functions to a file (or files) named anything.R in the R directory. The file should look like this, you can have one function per file, or multiple:

mymeanfun <- function(x){
       mean(x)
}

myfilterfun <- function(x, y){
       filter(x, y)
}

Now you should document the code. You can document (and import) using roxygen. Make sure you @import functions from any other packages, and @export the functions you want available. Roxygen and devtools will take care of everything else (namespace, requires etc etc.) until you get more advanced. Everything else is optional:

#' My Mean Function
#'
#' Takes the mean
#' @param x any default data type
#' @export
#' @examples
#' mymeanfun(c(1,2,3))
mymeanfun <- function(x){
       mean(x)
}
#' My Filter Function
#'
#' Identical to dplyr::filter
#' @param x a data.frame
#' @export
#' @importFrom dplyr filter
myfilterfun <- function(x, y){
       filter(x, y)
}

Now run the document() from roxygen2 in the directory you created:

setwd(".\mypackage")
document()

You are now up and running - I'd recommend putting it on github and installing from there:

install_github("yourgithubname/mypackage")

From then on, you can just call:

library(mypackage)

Every time you need your functions.

For more details and better documentation practices, see Hadley's book

  • Thank you jeremycg! That is a fantastic answer; I did some additional research last night and found a tutorial on youtube that covered this same approach. I'll give this a go later today. Thanks again for the great answer! – Sevyns Aug 18 '15 at 14:51
  • This works awesome.. For some reason, I was having issue.. and now the same command started working... however there are a few typos copied over from the original post on hillary's blog...roxygen2 should be in quotes. it maybe better to clarify that "parent_directory" is really not a command, but more in the sense of "/path/to/directory..Thanks.. – alpha_989 Sep 7 '17 at 14:00

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