I currently have the following code;

   interface

   {...}   

   type
      TMyRecord = record
        List : TShellList;
        Tree : TShellTree;
        Image : TImage;
      end;

      TSDIAppForm = class(TForm)
        { Published declarations }
      private
        function GetChildren(Sheet : TTabSheet) : TMyRecord;
      public
        { Public declarations }
      end;

As I understand it this means that TMyRecord is a global type visible to the whole program. The type only needs to be visible within the class, although objects of the type do need to be passed and returned as parameters to between "private" functions/procedures of the class. How can I do that? I can't declare the type under the "private" part of the class interface, and if I declare it in the implements then I don't believe it is visible to be used in the interface function prototypes. Also, I think implements/interface relate more to visibility within the unit than the class. Do I need to declare theGetChildren() function in some other way?

closed as off-topic by Jerry Dodge, Wouter van Nifterick, Jan Doggen, Ken White, David Heffernan Aug 18 '15 at 6:23

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Jerry Dodge, Wouter van Nifterick, Jan Doggen, Ken White, David Heffernan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    Why can't you declare the type in the private section? Which Delphi version are you using? – Uwe Raabe Aug 17 '15 at 23:21
  • Well, gee, I guess I can. I was getting an error but now it works. I couldn't google up any examples that showed something like this. Thanks. – Aladdin Aug 17 '15 at 23:27
  • 2
    Closing this question is imho inappropriate. The reasons for closing rely on capabilities in the Delphi language that are not present in all versions and so the question and the various answers may yet be of use to many people (in this case irrespective of the specific version being used by the OP). The more appropriate course would be to remove the erroneous reference to the nested type mechanism not appearing to work, leaving the question as a request for how to achieve a specific outcome rather than resolving a particular implementation error. – Deltics Aug 18 '15 at 7:46
  • Why would you need to hide the record type in the first place? What would that gain your program? – alcalde Aug 29 '15 at 1:18

Per Uwe, just declare in private section. Tested in XE8. The following works

  TSDIAppForm = class(TForm)
  private
  type
    TMyRecord = record
      List : TShellList;
      Tree : TShellTree;
      Image : TImage;
    end;

    function GetChildren(Sheet : TTabSheet) : TMyRecord;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

As noted in other answers, in versions of Delphi that support nested types you can simply declare the type within the required scope and visibility.

For older versions of Delphi you can achieve a similar outcome by using an untyped var parameter to avoid having to reference the 'private type' in the interface section of your unit:

TSDIAppForm = class(TForm)
  ..
  procedure GetChildren(Sheet : TTabSheet; var aRecord);
  ..
end;

For convenience and declarative type enforcement in the implementation of the method you can use an absolute declaration to create a local variable to act as placeholder for the untyped parameter:

procedure TSDIAppForm.GetChildren(    Sheet : TTabSheet; 
                                  var aRecord);
var
  result: TMyRecord absolute aRecord;
begin
  result.List := ...;
  // etc
end;

In this case, since the function has no direct return value and uses the var param in a directly analagous way you might choose to use the name result, as illustrated. Or of course you can use any other name for the local variable you prefer.

In use, you would simply call this method as normal with an appropriate variable in the var param:

var
  myRec: TMyRecord;
begin
  ..
  sdiForm.GetChildren(someSheet, myRec);
  ..
end;

In this way, you can keep a type which is an implementation detail truly confined to the implementation section of your unit.

NOTE: This technique can also be useful in situations where typed var parameters might otherwise cause the compiler to complain about 'formal var parameter types not matching'.

You should of course always consider carefully whether they are the right approach. Not least because whenever you use untyped parameters of course you take on a greater responsibility for ensuring type safety in your code. The potential for abuse should be obvious, but they sometimes offer advantages as well (as in this case, removing entirely a type from the interface section that is arguably most properly entirely confined to the implementation section).

They can also be a useful tool to keep in mind if you create code that you might wish to make available to users of older versions of Delphi where private types etc are not available.

  • 1
    In my opinion, it's better to make a public record type that can't be used than to use an untyped parameter. – David Heffernan Aug 18 '15 at 6:58
  • Yes, though of course by explaining the other possibilities people who were not aware are provided the opportunity to form an opinion. In this case a preference was already expressed - not least in the question itself - for not having a 'public but forbidden' type, I merely demonstrated how to avoid that even if using a version of Delphi which does not support publicly private 'forbidden' types (which imho is a solid reason for not closing the question - not everyone using "Delphi" has access to these). – Deltics Aug 18 '15 at 7:41
  • This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. That is undeniably true. – David Heffernan Aug 18 '15 at 7:54

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