308

I have a pandas dataframe. I want to print the unique values of one of its columns in ascending order. This is how I am doing it:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
a = df['A'].unique()
print a.sort()

The problem is that I am getting a None for the output.

2
  • 7
    a.sort() modifies a and does not return anything so replace by: a.sort(); print a
    – stellasia
    Commented Aug 18, 2015 at 12:13
  • 1
    Note: unique() returns a numpy.ndarray, so sort() is actually numpy.ndarray.sort() method. That's why the behavior is unexpected. drop_duplicates() returns a pandas series or dataframe, allowing use of sort_values().
    – wisbucky
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 8:19

9 Answers 9

400

sorted(iterable): Return a new sorted list from the items in iterable.

CODE

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
a = df['A'].unique()
print(sorted(a))

OUTPUT

[1, 2, 3, 6, 8]
1
  • 2
    This doesn't work if your column contains data with ambiguous boolean values, such as pandas' NAType - sorted() will raise a TypeError Commented Jul 8, 2021 at 20:33
53

sort sorts inplace so returns nothing:

In [54]:
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
a = df['A'].unique()
a.sort()
a

Out[54]:
array([1, 2, 3, 6, 8], dtype=int64)

So you have to call print a again after the call to sort.

Eg.:

In [55]:
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
a = df['A'].unique()
a.sort()
print(a)

[1 2 3 6 8]
1
  • The reason is because unique() returns a numpy.ndarray, so sort() is actually numpy.ndarray.sort() method. That's why the behavior is unexpected. drop_duplicates() returns a pandas series or dataframe, allowing use of sort_values().
    – wisbucky
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 8:21
41

You can also use the drop_duplicates() instead of unique()

df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
a = df['A'].drop_duplicates()
a.sort()
print a
2
  • 14
    Found drop_duplicates() to be 3 times faster than unique() on a dataframe of 14107693 rows [Pandas 0.18]
    – fixxxer
    Commented Oct 2, 2016 at 5:03
  • 13
    df['A'].drop_duplicates().sort_values() is my favorite
    – GitHunter0
    Commented Jul 30, 2021 at 1:03
26

Faster code

for large data frames:

df['A'].drop_duplicates().sort_values()
3
  • 11
    This answer would be more interesting if you provide the evidence for your claim
    – saQuist
    Commented Sep 29, 2021 at 15:00
  • 4
    drop_duplicates() is better than unique() because it can work with multiple cols (dataframes), not just single cols (series).
    – wisbucky
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 8:25
  • Not the fastest code. Try it against sorted(df.A.unique()). It's better than df.A.sort_values().unique() but certainly not the fastest code.
    – russhoppa
    Commented Oct 10, 2023 at 19:02
17

Came across the question myself today. I think the reason that your code returns 'None' (exactly what I got by using the same method) is that

a.sort()

is calling the sort function to mutate the list a. In my understanding, this is a modification command. To see the result you have to use print(a).

My solution, as I tried to keep everything in pandas:

pd.Series(df['A'].unique()).sort_values()
1
  • I like the pandas solution because it puts NaN values at the end and works with arrays of mixed types.
    – m13op22
    Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 15:31
16

I prefer the oneliner:

print(sorted(df['Column Name'].unique()))
9

I would suggest using numpy's sort, as it is anyway what pandas is doing in background:

import numpy as np
np.sort(df.A.unique())

But doing all in pandas is valid as well.

5

Another way is using set data type.

Some characteristic of Sets: Sets are unordered, can include mixed data types, elements in a set cannot be repeated, are mutable.

Solving your question:

df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,3,2,6,2,8]})
sorted(set(df.A))

The answer in List type:

[1, 2, 3, 6, 8]
0
2

Surprised no one suggested this:

df['A'].sort_values().unique()
2
  • 1
    Well, yes this works, but it doesn't make sense to do the sorting first (on the entire array) instead of last (on the reduced set). That's why every other answer does set -> sort.
    – tdy
    Commented Apr 6, 2023 at 21:23
  • Oh yeah it isn't as efficient. Looks cleaner but runs less well.
    – russhoppa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 15:45

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