1

I have quite a large dataset (over 1 million rows) of which a small sample is here:

structure(list(Feret = c(0.017, 0.016, 2.12, 0.016, 0.02, 0.023, 
0.017, 0.021, 0.02, 0.016, 0.027, 0.052, 0.061, 0.033, 0.041, 
0.017, 6.561, 7.123, 0.027, 0.018, 0.024, 4.099, 0.022, 0.025, 
0.037, 0.037, 0.018, 0.039, 0.027, 0.053, 0.016, 0.107, 0.52, 
0.041, 0.038, 0.039, 0.03, 0.071, 0.022, 0.118, 0.032, 0.018, 
0.027, 0.035, 8.113, 0.078, 4.089, 0.035, 0.057, 6.905, 2.5, 
0.282, 0.045, 0.039, 0.071, 0.037, 0.029, 0.027, 0.016, 0.02, 
0.026, 0.025, 0.026, 0.016, 0.016, 0.021), sample.type = structure(c(2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L), .Label = c("flower", "leaf"), class = "factor"), leaf.side = structure(c(2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L), .Label = c("lower", "upper"), class = "factor"), canopy = structure(c(2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L), .Label = c("bottom", "top"), class = "factor"), treatment = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 
4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 
4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 
3L), .Label = c("blue", "green", "grey", "white", "yel-green"
), class = "factor")), .Names = c("Feret", "sample.type", "leaf.side", 
"canopy", "treatment"), row.names = c(500000L, 500001L, 500002L, 
500003L, 500004L, 500005L, 500006L, 500007L, 500008L, 500009L, 
500010L, 800000L, 800001L, 800002L, 800003L, 800004L, 800005L, 
800006L, 800007L, 800008L, 800009L, 800010L, 1000L, 1001L, 1002L, 
1003L, 1004L, 1005L, 1006L, 1007L, 1008L, 1009L, 1010L, 10000L, 
10001L, 10002L, 10003L, 10004L, 10005L, 10006L, 10007L, 10008L, 
10009L, 10010L, 100000L, 100001L, 100002L, 100003L, 100004L, 
100005L, 100006L, 100007L, 100008L, 100009L, 100010L, 1160000L, 
1160001L, 1160002L, 1160003L, 1160004L, 1160005L, 1160006L, 1160007L, 
1160008L, 1160009L, 1160010L), class = "data.frame")

I have been trying to create frequency counts of the 'Feret' variable with the following binswidths:

bins <- c(0.01,0.03,0.1,0.3,1,3,10)

and then using:

freq<-hist(df_temp$Feret, breaks=bins)
ranges<-paste(head(bins,-1),bins[-1],sep=" - ")
freq$counts
df5<-data.frame(ranges = ranges, frequency = freq$counts)
df5

But what I really need to do is split the data.frame up by the various factors ("sample.type","leaf.side","canopy", "treatment") and extract frequency counts for each subset. I can do this the long winded way by manually creating each subset but I would like to do it a better way. I've tried using loops to create the subsets and then apply the hist() function to each subset, but it was taking a very long time. Is there a better way using Dplyr or Apply? I'd prefer to just to have the results in a table and then I can plot them as required.

  • Perhaps something like df %>% mutate(Feret = cut(Feret, breaks = bins)) %>% count_(., names(.))? – talat Aug 18 '15 at 13:23
  • Something like table(cut(df$Feret, bins)) – SabDeM Aug 18 '15 at 13:23
0

The following snippet should do what you want:

I loaded your sample into df.

library("dplyr")
df %>% group_by(sample.type, leaf.side, canopy, treatment) %>%
  dplyr::select(Feret) %>%
  do(data.frame(table(cut(.$Feret, breaks=bins, include.lowest=T))))

I refer you to the dplyr documentation. In short, x %>% f is f(x) and x -> f(a) is f(x,a).

Note that dplyr::select is just select, but I have had namespace issue so many times that now I always specify the package.

table(cut(df$Feret, breaks=bins)) is just a nicer way to do what you did with hist. With cut, you create a factor variable (Remember to add include.lowest=T if your values can reach the lower bound) and with table, you count the frequency of each level.

This gives:

   sample.type leaf.side canopy treatment        Var1 Freq
1       flower     upper    top     green (0.01,0.03]    0
2       flower     upper    top     green  (0.03,0.1]    6
3       flower     upper    top     green   (0.1,0.3]    1
4       flower     upper    top     green     (0.3,1]    0
5       flower     upper    top     green       (1,3]    1
6       flower     upper    top     green      (3,10]    3
7       flower     upper    top     white (0.01,0.03]    4
8       flower     upper    top     white  (0.03,0.1]    4
9       flower     upper    top     white   (0.1,0.3]    0
10      flower     upper    top     white     (0.3,1]    0
11      flower     upper    top     white       (1,3]    0
12      flower     upper    top     white      (3,10]    3
13        leaf     lower bottom     white (0.01,0.03]    5
14        leaf     lower bottom     white  (0.03,0.1]    4
15        leaf     lower bottom     white   (0.1,0.3]    1
16        leaf     lower bottom     white     (0.3,1]    1
17        leaf     lower bottom     white       (1,3]    0
18        leaf     lower bottom     white      (3,10]    0
19        leaf     lower    top      grey (0.01,0.03]   10
20        leaf     lower    top      grey  (0.03,0.1]    1
21        leaf     lower    top      grey   (0.1,0.3]    0
22        leaf     lower    top      grey     (0.3,1]    0
23        leaf     lower    top      grey       (1,3]    0
24        leaf     lower    top      grey      (3,10]    0
25        leaf     upper bottom     white (0.01,0.03]    4
26        leaf     upper bottom     white  (0.03,0.1]    6
27        leaf     upper bottom     white   (0.1,0.3]    1
28        leaf     upper bottom     white     (0.3,1]    0
29        leaf     upper bottom     white       (1,3]    0
30        leaf     upper bottom     white      (3,10]    0
31        leaf     upper    top      blue (0.01,0.03]   10
32        leaf     upper    top      blue  (0.03,0.1]    0
33        leaf     upper    top      blue   (0.1,0.3]    0
34        leaf     upper    top      blue     (0.3,1]    0
35        leaf     upper    top      blue       (1,3]    1
36        leaf     upper    top      blue      (3,10]    0

(Actually, it doesn't print like this since this is a tbl, but you can use print.data.frame to print a tbl the old way.)

From here it should be straightforward to extract the info you want.

  • Awesome, that works perfectly. Thank you. Now that's given me a taste for dplyr, I'll go and have a read through the documentation and see if i can find a tutorial. It doesn't look so daunting now I see your snippet of code and explanation. – Charles Whitfield Aug 18 '15 at 15:14
0

Start by defining a character vector with the factor names:

factors <- c("sample.type","leaf.side","canopy", "treatment")

Then use this vector to apply the hist() function to each factor (the data is assumed to be stored in a data frame object called df):

res <- sapply(factors, function(factor) {
  lapply(split(df[, c("Feret", factor)], df[[factor]]), function(group) {
    hist(group$Feret, breaks = bins, plot = FALSE)
  })
}, simplify = FALSE)

You now have a list with one element for each factor, each of which is again a list with an element for each level:

> names(res)
[1] "sample.type" "leaf.side"   "canopy"      "treatment"  
> names(res$sample.type)
[1] "flower" "leaf"
> res$sample.type$flower
$breaks
[1]  0.01  0.03  0.10  0.30  1.00  3.00 10.00

$counts
[1]  4 10  1  0  1  6

$density
[1] 9.09090909 6.49350649 0.22727273 0.00000000 0.02272727 0.03896104

$mids
[1] 0.020 0.065 0.200 0.650 2.000 6.500

$xname
[1] "group$Feret"

$equidist
[1] FALSE

attr(,"class")
[1] "histogram"
> 

You can format this into something that is suitable for plotting.

  • So this would be how to do it using apply. Many thanks. – Charles Whitfield Aug 18 '15 at 16:50
0

If we are not interested in the bins with no occurrences, we just need:

df %>% 
  group_by(sample.type, leaf.side, canopy, treatment, groups = cut(Feret, bins)) %>% 
  summarise(freq =n())

Output:

   sample.type leaf.side canopy treatment      groups freq
1       flower     upper    top     green  (0.03,0.1]    6
2       flower     upper    top     green   (0.1,0.3]    1
3       flower     upper    top     green       (1,3]    1
4       flower     upper    top     green      (3,10]    3
5       flower     upper    top     white (0.01,0.03]    4
6       flower     upper    top     white  (0.03,0.1]    4
7       flower     upper    top     white      (3,10]    3
8         leaf     lower bottom     white (0.01,0.03]    5
9         leaf     lower bottom     white  (0.03,0.1]    4
10        leaf     lower bottom     white   (0.1,0.3]    1
11        leaf     lower bottom     white     (0.3,1]    1
12        leaf     lower    top      grey (0.01,0.03]   10
13        leaf     lower    top      grey  (0.03,0.1]    1
14        leaf     upper bottom     white (0.01,0.03]    4
15        leaf     upper bottom     white  (0.03,0.1]    6
16        leaf     upper bottom     white   (0.1,0.3]    1
17        leaf     upper    top      blue (0.01,0.03]   10
18        leaf     upper    top      blue       (1,3]    1
  • Thanks. I was just wondering how to deal with the zero counts. – Charles Whitfield Aug 18 '15 at 16:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.