11

I have a directive attached to a dynamically generated <table> element inside a template. The directive manipulates the DOM of that table inside a link function. The problem is that the directive runs before the table is rendered (by evaluating ng-repeat directives) - the table is empty then.

Question

How can I make sure that the directive is ran after the table has been fully rendered?

<table directive-name>
    <tr ng-repeat="...">
        <td ng-repeat="..."></td>
    </tr>
</table>


module.directive("directiveName", function() {
    return {
        scope: "A",
        link: function(scope, element, attributes) {
            /* I need to be sure that the table is already fully
               rendered when this code runs */
        }
    };
});
  • 1
    You can add ng-if in the table tag and condition can be when table data is loaded – Hmahwish Aug 18 '15 at 13:41
  • is your data coming from $http request or just hard coded data – K.Toress Aug 18 '15 at 13:42
  • @K.Toress Data is coming from HTTP request, but it's already loaded when that template is processed - routing and controller takes care of that using resolve attribute in the $routeProvider configuration. – Robert Kusznier Aug 18 '15 at 13:44
  • 2
    can put a directive on ng-repeat rows and check for $last as trigger for your manipulation – charlietfl Aug 18 '15 at 13:47
  • 1
    @DeblatonJean-Philippe I still don't fully comprehend why directives run in the order they do, but it surelt isn't because of directive's priority. Priority matters only between directive applied to the same element, as described here under Directive Definition Object's priority : docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/service/… – Robert Kusznier Aug 21 '15 at 19:43
6

You can't, in a general sense, be ever "fully sure" by just having a directive on the <table> element.

But you can be sure in certain cases. In your case, if the inner content is ng-repeat-ed, then if the array of items over which ngRepeat works is ready, then the actual DOM elements will be ready at the end of the digest cycle. You can capture it after $timeout with 0 delay:

link: function(scope, element){
  $timeout(function(){
    console.log(element.find("tr").length); // will be > 0
  })
}

But, in a general sense, you can't be certain to capture the contents. What if the ngRepeated array is not there yet? Or what if there is an ng-include instead?

<table directive-name ng-include="'templates/tr.html'">
</table>

Or, what if there was a custom directive that worked differently than ngRepeat does?

But if you have full control of the contents, one possible way to know is to include some helper directive as the innermost/last element, and have it contact its parent directiveName when it's linked:

<table directive-name>
    <tr ng-repeat="...">
        <td ng-repeat="...">
          <directive-name-helper ng-if="$last">
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
.directive("directiveNameHelper", function(){
  return {
    require: "?^directiveName",
    link: function(scope, element, attrs, ctrl){
      if (!ctrl) return;

      ctrl.notifyDone();
    }
  }
})
  • 2
    That is the most comprehensive answer here, I think. Thanks. I still don't get why $timeout with 0 delay guarantees that DOM will be ready, but I guess I'll find that in Angular's $timeout docs. – Robert Kusznier Aug 18 '15 at 14:35
  • 2
    @Robert, ng-repeat has a $scope.$watchCollection - this fires after the link phase, and if the array is ready, then it transcludes the ng-repeat-ed template and places it in the DOM. $timeout with 0 delay executes right after that – New Dev Aug 18 '15 at 14:37
5

Try wrapping in a $timeout the code from your link function as it will execute after the DOM is rendered.

$timeout(function () {
    //do your stuff here as the DOM has finished rendering already
});

Don't forget to inject $timeout in your directive:

.directive("directiveName", function($timeout) {

There are plenty of alternatives but I think this one is cleaner as the $timeout executes after the rendering engine has finished its job.

  • Great! It works! – iMarh May 9 at 14:34
0

A clean way would be to use something like lodash's _.defer method.

You can call it with _.defer(your_func, your_func_arg1, your_func_arg2, ...) inside your link to execute the method, when the current call stack has cleared and everything is ready.

This way, you don't have to estimate a $timeout by yourself.

  • 1
    _.defer simply calls setTimout with no delay, albeit it does some run-time checks on the parameters you pass in. Unless you're using lodash already, you might as well use NG's built in $timeout with no delay. – jusopi Aug 18 '15 at 15:26
  • Didn't know that, thanks! – Martin Seeler Aug 18 '15 at 15:36

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