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Mmap returns a void*, but not a volatile void*. If I'm using mmap to map shared memory, then another process could be writing to that memory, which means two subsequent reads from the same memory location can yield different values -- the exact situation volatile is meant for. So why doesn't it return a volatile void*?

My best guess is that if you have a process that's exclusively writing to the shared memory segment, it doesn't need to look at the shared memory through volatile pointers because it will always have the right understanding of what's present; any optimizations the compiler does to prevent redundant reads won't matter since there is nothing else writing and changing the values under its feet. Or is there some other historical reason? I'm inclined to say returning volatile void* would be a safer default, and those wanting this optimization could then manually cast to void*.

POSIX mmap description: http://opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007908775/xsh/mmap.html

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The deeply-held assumption running through many software systems is that most programmers are sequential programmers. This has only recently started to change.

mmap has dozens of uses not related to shared memory. In the event that a programmer is writing a multithreaded program, they must take their own steps to ensure safety. Protecting each variable with a mutex is not the default. Likewise, mmap does not assume that another thread will make contentious accesses to the same shared-memory segment, or even that a segment so mapped will be accessible by another thread.

I'm also unconvinced that marking the return of mmap as volatile will have an effect on this. A programmer would still have to ensure safety in access to the mapped region, no?

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  • A memory access would only "not be contentious" in this sense if two process never accessed the same byte in the segment, which would defeat the point of using shared memory. You still have to ensure the safety of access to the shared region, but that's a different issue. – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 20:31
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    @Joseph Garvin: actually, there are valid write-once-read-many situations where accesses do not conflict and shared memory is still a useful paradigm. For instance, the memory region could be created and written to, and then other processes created to read it. Since they exist after the write in program order, they cannot see the old value. – Borealid Jul 8 '10 at 20:34
  • True, if the writer process finish its writing before the readers are ever created, then the readers will only see the new value. I hadn't considered that case. I still think it's the wrong default though ;) – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 21:00
  • Very delayed accept :P I think mmap's non shared memory use cases are probably the reason, and if C had a stronger type system you'd probably want mmap split into different functions (so the shared memory case could have a more informative type). – Joseph Garvin Oct 25 '11 at 17:29
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    One can use mmap to map physical memory into multiple virtual memory pages within the same process in single threaded code. Which means that at runtime one can have two pointers, with two different virtual addresses, pointing to the same physical memory address, such that changes performed by a write through one pointer can be seen by a read from the other. If these pointers were volatile everything would be fine, but since they are not, compilers can optimize code to nonsense. – gnzlbg Mar 9 '16 at 11:58
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Implementing shared memory is only one small subset of the uses of mmap(). In fact the most common uses are creating private mappings, both anonymous and file-backed. This means that, even if we accepted your contention about requiring a volatile-qualified pointer for shared memory access, such a qualifier would be superfluous in the general case.

Remember that you can always add final qualifiers to a pointer type without casting, but you can't remove them. So, with the current mmap() declaration, you can do both this:

volatile char *foo = mmap();  /* I need volatile */

and this:

char *bar = mmap();  /* But _I_ do not */

With your suggestion, the users in the common case would have to cast the volatile away.

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Being volatile would only cover a single read (which depending on the architecture might be 32 bit or something else, and thus be quite limiting. Often you'll need to write more than 1 machine word, and you'll anyway have to introduce some sort of locking.

Even if it were volatile, you could easily have 2 processes reading different values from the same memory, all it takes is a 3. process to write to the memory in the nanosecond between the read from the 1. process and the read from the 2. process(unless you can guarantee the 2 processes reading the same memory within almost exact the same clock cycles.

Thus - it's pretty useless for mmap() to try to deal with these things, and is better left up to the programmer how to deal with access to the memory and mark the pointer as volatile where needed - if the memory is shared - you will need to have all partys involved be cooperative and aware of how they can update the memory in relation to eachother - something out of scope of mmap, and something volative will not solve.

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    volatile void* and void volatile* are exactly the same. The different version is void* volatile. – Mark B Jul 8 '10 at 20:33
  • "Being volatile would only cover a single read" <-- I'm not sure what you mean. Being volatile means that every use of the variable will force a new read. How would that only cover a single read? – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 20:34
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    It just means that adding volatile, you could read a 32 bit value and always get a consistant result (on most 32 bit machines anyhow) even if someone else updates that 32 bit value, whilst reading a 64 bit value you could get an inconsistant result - volatile won't "protect" you, or guarantee that you see the most recent value in that case. And that's just the nice case, other processes could be manupilating arbitary chunks of bytes. – nos Jul 8 '10 at 20:41
  • @nos: That's not my understanding of volatile. If I make a 100 byte struct, and declare it volatile, reads from any part of it will not be cached. I don't think this is architecture specific. Volatile shares the same propagating semantics as const. – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 20:54
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    @Joseph Garvin You're right that it will not be cached (although on a multicore x86 machine it could be cached in l1/l2 cache unless the writing is prefixed with the LOCK opcode - which adding volatile will not do), but nothing stops someone else from changing the 2. byte in one of your integers in that struct while you read from it - the point is, having mmap return a volatile pointer solves almost nothing, so it's up to the programmer to make that pointer volatile if it's needed, and its up to the programmer to deal with (the much larger) issue of locking/cooperative access. – nos Jul 8 '10 at 21:06
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I don't think volatile does what you think it does.

Basically, it just tells the compiler not to optimize the variable by storing its value in a register. This forces it to retrieve the value each time you reference it, which is a good idea if another thread (or whatever) could have updated it in the interim.

The function returns a void*, but it's not going to be updated, so calling it volatile is meaningless. Even if you assigned the value to a local volatile void*, nothing would be gained.

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    Downvoted, you need to expound for your answer to be useful. I think you're assuming I think volatile acts as a memory barrier or has something to do with threading, I'm fully aware that it doesn't. – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 20:23
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    @Joseph, volatile would protect you against multithreaded changes to the value of the void* itself. It doesn't protect you against changes to the data pointed to. – JSBձոգչ Jul 8 '10 at 20:25
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    @JS Bangs: No. You are misreading the type. That would be the case for a "void* volatile" not a "volatile void *". – Joseph Garvin Jul 8 '10 at 20:27
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    @terminus: A volatile void* would have to be downcast to, say, a volatile int* before dereferencing. A normal cast can add volatile but not remove it, so having volatile in the function's return would have some effect. See elsewhere for a healthy debate on whether that effect is the desired one. – Steven Sudit Jul 9 '10 at 15:45
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    @terminus: In C++, you can only remove a const or volatile using const_cast, unless you use a dangerous C-style cast, as in your examples. I do realize that the question mentions C, but all of my C programming these days is technically C++, allowing me to take advantage of language improvements even if I'm not using the OOPL features or libraries. – Steven Sudit Jul 10 '10 at 8:57
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It's probably done that way for performance reasons, providing nothing extra by default. If you know that on your particular architecture that writes/reads won't be reordered by the processor you may not need volatile at all (possibly in conjuction with other synchronization). EDIT: this was just an example - there may be a variety of other cases where you know that you don't need to force a reread every time the memory is accessed.

If you need to ensure that all the addresses are read from memory each time they're accessed, const_cast (or C-style cast) volatile onto the return value yourself.

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  • Are you sure that'll have any effect? – Steven Sudit Jul 8 '10 at 20:58
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The type volatile void * or void * volatile is nonsensical: you cannot dereference a void *, so it doesn't make sense to specify type qualifiers to it.

And, since you anyway need a cast to char * or whatever your data type, then perhaps that is the right place to specify volatility. Thus, the API as defined nicely side-steps the responsibility of marking the memory changable-under-your-feet/volatile.

That said, from a big picture POV, I agree with you: mmap should have a return type stating that the compiler should not cache this range.

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  • Could the down-voters comment on why this is being downvoted? – terminus Jul 9 '10 at 20:46
  • I didn't downvote you, but I suspect it's because your answer overlooks the issues that caf covered and that came up in a comment you made to me. – Steven Sudit Jul 10 '10 at 9:00

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