I'm using re.sub like this:

def some_func(text):
    text = my_regex.sub(lambda m: do_something(m), text)
    return text

Sometimes I want to preserve, separately, the things that my_regex is capturing.

To do that in one pass, I can imagine do_something could alter a global variable before returning the text to sub in:

captures = []
def do_something(m):
    global captures
    captures = []
    if m.group(1):
         captures.append(m.group(1))
    return 'TEXT_TO_SUB_IN'

so that then:

def some_func(text):
    text = my_regex.sub(lambda m: do_something(m), text)
    c = deepcopy(captures)

But this is terrible. Turning this all into a class and doing something similar also seems bad.

Is there better pattern for doing that: for subbing and also returning the captures in one pass?

  • Give us an example of how your regex would look if you were going to capture and replace in the same pass. I know sub doesn't do this, but if we saw how you are thinking of the problem, it could help. – Wolf Aug 18 '15 at 18:43
  • You could return a tuple of values, the text with the substitution and the match group. – wwii Aug 18 '15 at 18:43
  • You don't need to "declare" captures as global in your example, because you only .append() to it. global or nonlocal would be needed if you were to assign to that variable. – Dima Tisnek Aug 18 '15 at 18:54
  • @qarma I am assigning. I'm clearing it with each use. – bahmait Aug 18 '15 at 18:58
  • Ah, correct; you can also clear a list by captured[:] = [] without assigning the label captured itself. – Dima Tisnek Aug 18 '15 at 19:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of global you can use a closure:

def do_whatever():
    def sub(text):
        captured.append(text)
        return "new"

    captured = []
    result = re.sub(r".*", sub, "test test")
    print captured

    captured = []
    result = re.sub(r".*", sub, "foo bar")
    print captured
  • Really beautiful. Thank you. – bahmait Aug 18 '15 at 19:17

First of all, the two lines

text = my_regex.sub(lambda m: do_something(m), text)

and

text = my_regex.sub(do_something, text)

have identical effect, so there's no need to introduce the complexity of a lambda.

Secondly, in the code

global captures
captures = []
if m.group(1):
     captures.append(m.group(1))

you should delete the first two statements. You shouldn't set it to empty each time you perform a match or you'll lose the results of previous matches, and since that means you are only mutating the list rather than assigning to it, you don't need the global statement.

But full marks for thinking of a function, which does appear to be the most productive approach.

The value returned by the function given as a first argument to re.sub is used as the replacement string, so you don't have the chance to return other values that could be stashed by additional code.

In short, once you remove the deficiencies mentioned above, which I presume are down to simple inexperience, you've actually got a practical solution to your problem.

  • Thank you - did not realize that re: lambda vs just passing in the function. (I did in fact want to clear that global each time, as some_func was picking up the result for each pass.) – bahmait Aug 18 '15 at 19:26

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