7

I'm fiddling around with generics in Swift and hit something I can't figure out: If I cast a value into the type of a generic parameter, the cast is not performed. If I try the same with static types, it works.

class SomeClass<T> {
    init?() {
        if let _ = 4 as? T {
            println("should work")
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int?>() {
    println("not called")
}

if let _ = 4 as? Int? {
    println("works")
}

Can anybody explain this behavior? Shouldn't be both cases equivalent?

Update

The above example is simplified to the max. The following example illustrates the need for a cast a little better

class SomeClass<T> {
    init?(v: [String: AnyObject]) {
        if let _ = v["k"] as? T? {
            print("should work")
        } else {
            print("does not")
            return nil
        }
    }
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int?>(v: ["k": 4]) {
    print("not called")
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int>(v: ["k": 4]) {
    print("called")
}

2nd Update

After @matt made me learn about AnyObject and Any and @Darko pointed out in his comments how dictionaries make my example too complicated, here's my next refinement

class SomeClass<T> {
    private var value: T!

    init?<U>(param: U) {
        if let casted = param as? T {
            value = casted
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}


if let _ = SomeClass<Int?>(param: Int(4)) {
    println("not called")
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int>(param: Int(4)) {
    println("called")
}

if let _ = Int(4) as? Int? {
    println("works")
}

if let _ = (Int(4) as Any) as? Int? {
    println("Cannot downcast from Any to a more optional type 'Int?'")
}

I tried using init?(param: Any) before, but that yields the same problem illustrated in the last if which is discussed elsewhere.

So all it comes down to: Has anyone really been far as to ever cast anything to a generic optional type? In any case? I'm happy to accept any working example.

2
  • I'm also stuck on this; feels like a hole in the language. Did you ever get a resolution? Feb 2, 2017 at 0:32
  • I just tried the third example in an Xcode 8.2.1 project again (Playgrounds are currently broken for me) and it runs as expected, printing not called and called. I could also change T! to T.
    – Sebastian
    Feb 27, 2017 at 6:17

3 Answers 3

3

This is really not about generics at all; it's about AnyObject (and how casting works). Consider:

    let d = ["k":1]
    let ok = d["k"] is Int?
    print (ok) // true

    // but:

    let d2 = d as [String:AnyObject]
    let ok2 = d2["k"] is Int?
    print (ok2) // false, though "is Int" succeeds

Since your initializer casts the dictionary up to [String:AnyObject] you are in this same boat.

7
  • So why does 'let ok2 = d2["k"] is Int' succeed? dict adds always the optional to the return value and apart from that Int is not a class type like AnyObject.
    – Darko
    Aug 19, 2015 at 23:31
  • Because when you say "is", an Optional gets special treatment; we pretend you posed to the question "is" to the thing-inside-the-optional. So now we're asking "Can this AnyObject be cast down to an Int" - and it can, because it is an NSNumber. But an AnyObject cannot be cast down to an Optional<Int>.
    – matt
    Aug 20, 2015 at 0:24
  • In other words, once you realize that the generic in the original question is a complete red herring, everything happening here is covered by my book's discussion of casting (apeth.com/swiftBook/ch04.html#_casting) and of AnyObject (apeth.com/swiftBook/ch04.html#_anyobject).
    – matt
    Aug 20, 2015 at 0:32
  • Ok, so the intermediate step over NSNumber was the missing link to understanding. I just tried to let d : [String: Int64] = ["k":1] and you are right, the cast to [String: AnyObject] does not work anymore, because NSNumber is not compatible with Int64. But why AnyObject can not be cast down to Optional<Int>? It could assume Optional<NSNumber>. You wrote: "Because when you say "is", an Optional gets special treatment; we pretend you posed to the question "is" to the thing-inside-the-optional." It's somehow inconsistent. (can not find the explanation in your book)
    – Darko
    Aug 20, 2015 at 0:58
  • I don't see why it's inconsistent. Optional<NSNumber> is not a class type. It is not bridged to Objective-C. You cannot cast an Int? or an NSNumber? up to AnyObject, so there's no chance in the world that you'd ever be able to cast an AnyObject down to either of those things. What surprises me is that the compiler lets you pose the question at all.
    – matt
    Aug 20, 2015 at 1:23
1

This works as expected now - in Playgrounds as well as in projects. Retested in Swift 5.4:

class SomeClass<T> {
    private var value: T

    init?<U>(param: U) {
        if let casted = param as? T {
            value = casted
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}


if let _ = SomeClass<Int?>(param: Int(4)) {
    print("called")
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int>(param: Int(4)) {
    print("called")
}

which prints called two times as expected.

1
  • Side note: My previous reply from 2017 that it's working as expected got deleted. Not sure why. The question just received another upvote, so I thought it might be worth sharing the current state of things.
    – Sebastian
    Oct 3, 2021 at 11:29
0

As far I can see the goal of your updated code is to find out if the passed parameter (the value of the dict) is of type T. So you are mis-using the as? cast to check the type. What you actually want is the "is" operator.

class SomeClass<T> {
    init?(v: [String: AnyObject]) {
        if v["k"] is T {
            print("called if AnyObject is of type T")
        } else {
            print("called if AnyObject is not of type T")
            return nil
        }
    }
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int>(v: ["k": 4]) {
    print("called")
}

if let _ = SomeClass<Int?>(v: ["k": 4]) {
    print("not called")
}

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