I have updated my app to use the latest support library (version 23.0.0), I've found out that they deprecated the onAttach() function of the Fragment class.

Instead of:

onAttach (Activity activity)

It's now:

onAttach (Context context)

As my app uses the activity passed before deprecation, a possible solution i think is:

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);
    activity = getActivity();
}

Would that be the correct way to do it?

UPDATE:

If i run a device with API lower than 23, the new onAttach() is not even being called. I hope that this is not what they intended to do!

UPDATE 2:

Issue has been resolved with the latest updates to the SDK.

I have tested on my API 22 device and onAttach(Context) is being called.

Click here to follow the bug report I've opened a couple of weeks ago and the answers from the guys at Google.

  • If you are using specific Activity methods from your passed instance then, have you tried casting the context to your Activity's? Remember Activity is a subclass of Context. Maybe a casting would work. – MarkSkayff Aug 18 '15 at 21:54
  • for some reason, the onAttach() is not even being called! any ideas? did you try updating to the latest support lib.? – TareK Khoury Aug 20 '15 at 17:56
  • 2
    Why has the API moved to Context? Don't you need an Activity in order to attach and display a fragment anyways? How else will you use the Context parameter? – Kenneth Worden Aug 25 '15 at 3:15
  • 1
    I have posted it as a bug, see link code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=183358 – TareK Khoury Aug 30 '15 at 9:37
  • 6
    For the new onAttach(Context context) to be called, you need to either use a device that has at least API 23 OR use android.support.v4.app.Fragment. See here – nevzo Sep 26 '15 at 15:46
up vote 305 down vote accepted

Activity is a context so if you can simply check the context is an Activity and cast it if necessary.

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    Activity a;

    if (context instanceof Activity){
        a=(Activity) context;
    }

}

Update: Some are claiming that the new Context override is never called. I have done some tests and cannot find a scenario where this is true and according to the source code, it should never be true. In all cases I tested, both pre and post SDK23, both the Activity and the Context versions of onAttach were called. If you can find a scenario where this is not the case, I would suggest you create a sample project illustrating the issue and report it to the Android team.

Update 2: I only ever use the Android Support Library fragments as bugs get fixed faster there. It seems the above issue where the overrides do not get called correctly only comes to light if you use the framework fragments.

  • 5
    Not really a solution since onAttach with context is not called the same way as onAttach with activity. If you have some initialization code in onAttach with an activity as parameter this change won't work. – Buddy Aug 21 '15 at 19:18
  • 2
    No, it doesn't work the same, at least in my case. I don't use activity nor context in onAttach, I do initialization. I've tried replacing onAttach with activity to the one with context and it doesn't get called in the same way. So they aren't that easily interchangeable. – Buddy Aug 21 '15 at 19:46
  • 6
    Same issues that Buddy has... onAttach(Context) doesn't even seem to be called. – Stéphane Aug 24 '15 at 11:40
  • 2
    I have stepped through my code and I can verify that it is possible for onAttach(context) to not be called. – Chad Bingham Aug 31 '15 at 23:53
  • 2
    In my case, the onAttach() won't be called if the we restart the activity which is cleared by the system before. But it's not always like this. I put a initialization of a WeakReference in the onAttach(Context context), refActivity = new WeakReference<>((AppCompatActivity) context). And it throws NullPointerException in the onCreateView() occasionally. – Kimi Chiu Dec 19 '15 at 9:14

This is another great change from Google ... The suggested modification: replace onAttach(Activity activity) with onAttach(Context context) crashed my apps on older APIs since onAttach(Context context) will not be called on native fragments.

I am using the native fragments (android.app.Fragment) so I had to do the following to make it work again on older APIs (< 23).

Here is what I did:

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    // Code here
}

@SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
@Override
public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
    super.onAttach(activity);

    if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT < Build.VERSION_CODES.M) {
        // Code here
    }
}
  • thanks mate, it works on Himax/Gionee (API 17) – Conan Jun 28 '16 at 9:26
  • Mr.Yoann Hercouet, Can u explain how to do it above API 23, kindly help me, thanks in advance, E/AndroidRuntime: FATAL EXCEPTION: main, java.lang.ClassCastException: com.ual.SMS_Activity@afd5683, at android.support.v4.app.FragmentManagerImpl.moveToState, at android.support.v4.app.FragmentManagerImpl.execSingleAction. Here i posted necessary lines which will u to know my bug. – MohanRaj S Aug 6 '16 at 6:25
  • @MohanRajS It is the same on API 24 (the one I used), according to your piece of code, your problem does not seem to have to do anything with this. – Yoann Hercouet Aug 6 '16 at 8:29
  • @YoannHercouet ,Thank u for your reply, let me check and update. – MohanRaj S Aug 6 '16 at 10:47
  • Doesn't work for me. – grant Jan 22 '17 at 5:10

If you use the the framework fragments and the SDK version of the device is lower than 23, OnAttach(Context context) wouldn't be called.

I use support fragments instead, so deprecation is fixed and onAttach(Context context) always gets called.

Currently from the onAttach Fragment code, it is not clear if the Context is the current activity: Source Code

public void onAttach(Context context) {
    mCalled = true;
    final Activity hostActivity = mHost == null ? null : mHost.getActivity();
    if (hostActivity != null) {
        mCalled = false;
        onAttach(hostActivity);
    }
}

If you will take a look at getActivity you will see the same call

/**
 * Return the Activity this fragment is currently associated with.
 */
final public Activity getActivity() {
    return mHost == null ? null : mHost.getActivity();
}

So If you want to be sure that you are getting the Activity then use getActivity() (in onAttach in your Fragment) but don't forget to check for null because if mHost is null your activity will be null

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    Activity activity = context instanceof Activity ? (Activity) context : null;
}

Download newest Support library with the sdk manager and include

compile 'com.android.support:appcompat-v7:23.1.1'

in gradle.app and set compile version to api 23

The answer below is related to this deprecation warning occurring in the Fragments tutorial on the Android developer website and may not be related to the posts above.

I used this code on the tutorial lesson and it did worked.

public void onAttach(Context context){
    super.onAttach(context);

    Activity activity = getActivity();

I was worried that activity maybe null as what the documentation states.

getActivity

FragmentActivity getActivity () Return the FragmentActivity this fragment is currently associated with. May return null if the fragment is associated with a Context instead.

But the onCreate on the main_activity clearly shows that the fragment was loaded and so after this method, calling get activity from the fragment will return the main_activity class.

getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction() .add(R.id.fragment_container, firstFragment).commit();

I hope I am correct with this. I am an absolute newbie.

you are probably using android.support.v4.app.Fragment. For this instead of onAttach method, just use getActivity() to get the FragmentActivity with which the fragment is associated with. Else you could use onAttach(Context context) method.

Although it seems that in most cases it's enough to have onAttach(Context), there are some phones (i.e: Xiaomi Redme Note 2) where it's not being called, thus it causes NullPointerExceptions. So to be on the safe side I suggest to leave the deprecated method as well:

// onAttach(Activity) is necessary in some Xiaomi phones
@SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
@Override
public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
    super.onAttach(activity);
    _onAttach(activity);
}

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);
    _onAttach(context);
}

private void _onAttach(Context context) {
    // do your real stuff here
}
  • This worked great for me! – MDV2000 Sep 21 at 14:10

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