2

input

{"key1": ["value1", "value2"], "key2": ["value3"]}

Desired output

key1, value1
key1, value2
key2, value3

Having a hard time figuring out jq command to achieve this... I have tried map, as, to_entries filters in various combinations but no luck.

4

I removed the extra pair of brackets around your JSON object in order to make it a valid JSON. So, starting with this:

{
  "key1": [ "value1", "value2" ],
  "key2": [ "value3" ]
}

We apply to_entries, which gives us this:

[
  {
    "key": "key1",
    "value": [ "value1", "value2" ]
  },
  {
    "key": "key2",
    "value": [ "value3" ]
  }
]

Then, we map each of those entries and we spread ([]) the .value array, creating a separate object for each of its elements (map({key, value: .value[]})). This gives us:

[
  {
    "key": "key1",
    "value": "value1"
  },
  {
    "key": "key1",
    "value": "value2"
  },
  {
    "key": "key2",
    "value": "value3"
  }
]

After that, for each of those objects, we want an array with its values, since that's what the @csv filter expects. That's just mapping to an array object, as in map([.key, .value]), which gives us:

[
  [ "key1", "value1" ],
  [ "key1", "value2" ],
  [ "key2", "value3" ]
]

And, finally, we spread ([]) the array of arrays (since @csv expects individual arrays) and we pipe @csv to it. The full script looks as follows:

jq -r 'to_entries | map({key, value: .value[]}) | map([.key, .value])[] | @csv' test.json

And its output:

"key1","value1"  
"key1","value2"  
"key2","value3"
1
  • Thanks Santiago for step by step explanation. Updated the question to remove the extra brackets (was a result of me trying to simplify the input for the post) – Emad Salman Aug 19 '15 at 7:31
1

You can skip a few steps building up the rows.

$ jq -r 'to_entries[] | { key, value: .value[] } | [ .key, .value ] | @csv'

In jq 1.5, you can utilize the new combinations filter to generate combinations of the keys and values.

$ jq -r 'to_entries[] | [ [.key], .value ] | combinations | @csv'
0

Here is a short solution using just jq's [] operator and \() string interpolation. Use along with the jq -r flag to avoid extra quotes in final output.

  . as $v
| keys[]
| "\(.), \($v[.][])"

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