2

I have a Swift struct which contains an object for internal storage. How can I make sure the struct has value semantics?

public struct Times {
    private let times = NSMutableIndexSet()

    mutating func addTimeRange(openTime: Int, closeTime: Int) {
        self.times.addIndexesInRange(NSRange(location: openTime, length: closeTime - openTime))
    }
}
1
4

Swift 3 Update

Swift 3 includes value types for many types from the Foundation framework. There is now an IndexSet struct, which bridges to NSIndexSet. The internal implementation is similar to the Swift 2 solution below.

For more information on the new Foundation value types see: https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/0069-swift-mutability-for-foundation.md

Old approach in Swift 2

The copy-on-write approach is the right solution. However, it is not necessary to create a copy of the NSMutableIndexSet, if only one struct instance references it. Swift provides a global function called isUniquelyReferencedNonObjC() to determine if a pure Swift object is only referenced once.

Since we cannot use this function with Objective-C classes, we need to wrap NSMutableIndexSet in a Swift class.

public struct Times {
    private final class MutableIndexSetWrapper {
        private let mutableIndexSet: NSMutableIndexSet

        init(indexSet: NSMutableIndexSet) {
            self.mutableIndexSet = indexSet
        }

        init() {
            self.mutableIndexSet = NSMutableIndexSet()
        }
    }

    private let times = MutableIndexSetWrapper()

    mutating func addTimeRange(openTime: Int, closeTime: Int) {
        // Make sure our index set is only referenced by this struct instance
        if !isUniquelyReferencedNonObjC(&self.times) {
            self.times = MutableIndexSetWrapper(indexSet: NSMutableIndexSet(indexSet: self.times.mutableIndexSet))
        }

        let range = NSRange(location: openTime, length: closeTime - openTime)

        self.times.mutableIndexSet.addIndexesInRange(range)
    }
}
5
  • Doesn't guarantee that the wrapped index set isn't multiply referenced.
    – matt
    Sep 2 '15 at 13:06
  • 1
    That is not an issue. This is the same technique Apple uses internally for Swift's Array, Dictionary, etc. See this post for more information: chris.eidhof.nl/posts/struct-semantics-in-swift.html
    – Florian
    Sep 2 '15 at 14:51
  • 1
    It is exactly the issue you asked about in your original question. If the wrapped index set is a mutable index set, the problem you are trying to solve remains unsolved - it can possibly be mutated behind your back. The solution is the solution I gave: use an NSIndexSet.
    – matt
    Sep 2 '15 at 14:53
  • MutableIndexSetWrapper is a private class and the wrapped NSMutableIndexSet is never exposed publicly. That's why it cannot be changed behind your back.
    – Florian
    Sep 2 '15 at 15:03
  • 1
    I understand that that's what you are hoping. But things like privacy are contractual; it is possible that this privacy will be violated. What you're doing will work if everyone is well-behaved - but of course, that would be true even without the privacy! There is a difference between hope and guarantee. Your approach is a hope. My approach is a guarantee.
    – matt
    Sep 2 '15 at 16:14
3

Store an NSIndexSet instead of an NSMutableIndexSet. That is exactly why the immutable superclass exists.

public struct Times {
    private var times = NSIndexSet()
    mutating func addTimeRange(openTime: Int, closeTime: Int) {
        let t = NSMutableIndexSet(indexSet:self.times)
        t.addIndexesInRange(NSRange(location: openTime, length: closeTime - openTime))
        self.times = NSIndexSet(indexSet:t)
    }
}

If this were a class instead of a struct, you could cause the last step to be performed automatically by declaring times as @NSCopying and then just using simple assignment:

public class Times {
    @NSCopying private var times = NSIndexSet()
    func addTimeRange(openTime: Int, closeTime: Int) {
        let t = NSMutableIndexSet(indexSet:self.times)
        t.addIndexesInRange(NSRange(location: openTime, length: closeTime - openTime))
        self.times = t // ensure immutable copy
    }
}
2
  • Thanks, matt. This kind of solution is also mentioned in the WWDC 2015 talk "Building Better Apps with Value Types in Swift" developer.apple.com/videos/wwdc/2015/?id=414 starting at about 30 minutes. However, it is not necessary to create an immutable copy of the mutable index set. So, your last line could just be self.times = indexSet. Which saves another object creation.
    – Florian
    Aug 24 '15 at 6:13
  • 1
    "However, it is not necessary to create an immutable copy of the mutable index set" I think it is.
    – matt
    Aug 24 '15 at 16:45
1

It might be an option to use Swift's native Set type which has value-semantics built in since it is a struct itself.

public struct Times {
    private var times = Set<Int>()
    mutating func addTimeRange(openTime: Int, closeTime: Int) {
        (openTime ..< closeTime).map({ index -> Void in self.times.insert(index) })
    }
}

let t1 = Times()
var t2 = t1
t2.addTimeRange(0, closeTime: 3)

println(t1.times) // []
println(t2.times) // [2, 0, 1]

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