63

With Jasmine is there a way to test if 2 arrays contain the same elements, but are not necessarily in the same order? ie

array1 = [1,2,3];
array2 = [3,2,1];

expect(array1).toEqualIgnoreOrder(array2);//should be true
  • 20
    expect(array1.sort()).toEqual(array2.sort()); ? – raina77ow Aug 19 '15 at 18:43
  • @raina77ow I guess that would work as well. – David says Reinstate Monica Aug 19 '15 at 18:44
  • 1
    Should I make this an answer? – raina77ow Aug 19 '15 at 18:46
  • @raina77ow It gets a little bit more complicated when its an array of objects. It would be nice if Jasmine had something out of the box for this. – David says Reinstate Monica Aug 19 '15 at 18:48
  • 2
    I didn't find anything great in jasmine itself so actually introduced lodash (or you could use underscore/other js collection library) into my test project for things just like this. – ktharsis Aug 19 '15 at 20:45

13 Answers 13

47

If it's just integers or other primitive values, you can sort() them before comparing.

expect(array1.sort()).toEqual(array2.sort());

If its objects, combine it with the map() function to extract an identifier that will be compared

array1 = [{id:1}, {id:2}, {id:3}];
array2 = [{id:3}, {id:2}, {id:1}];

expect(array1.map(a => a.id).sort()).toEqual(array2.map(a => a.id).sort());
  • the default array sort method uses string comparison for numbers. "10" < "2" === true – Shmiddty May 22 '18 at 20:46
  • [10, 2, 1].sort() ---> [1, 10, 2] – Shmiddty May 22 '18 at 21:00
  • 5
    @Shmiddty I dont see how it matters in this case. As long as the order is the same for both arrays, it should be fine. – Kaspars May 23 '18 at 13:43
  • 1
    Fair point. It is worth noting that sort happens in-place, though. (it mutates the instance on which it is called) – Shmiddty May 23 '18 at 19:32
  • @Shmiddty that's true, but .map returns a new array, so you're still not mutating the original. – redbmk Jan 2 '19 at 21:04
10
// check if every element of array2 is element of array1
// to ensure [1, 1] !== [1, 2]
array2.forEach(x => expect(array1).toContain(x))

// check if every element of array1 is element of array2
// to ensure [1, 2] !== [1, 1]
array1.forEach(x => expect(array2).toContain(x))

// check if they have equal length to ensure [1] !== [1, 1]
expect(array1.length).toBe(array2.length)
  • 2
    Use .forEach instead of .map to save some time and a bunch of memory. – Darkhogg Mar 19 '18 at 11:59
  • 1
    Unfortunately this will pass with the following arrays even though they are different: array1 = [1, 2], array2 = [1, 1] – redbmk Jan 3 '19 at 17:22
  • 2
    Nice catch @redbmk I added a check for this, thanks! – Jannic Beck Jan 8 '19 at 9:04
  • I think there's still an issue - what if the arrays are [1,1,2] and [1,2,2]? Maybe using a Map for each one or something? e.g. array1.reduce((map, item) => { map.set(item, (map.get(item) || 0) + 1)), new Map()) for both arrays, then loop through them and check that the amounts are the same? Seems like a lot of iterations but would be more thorough. – redbmk Jan 11 '19 at 21:16
  • Exclusions from the control array may be used (remove element when found, then check length is 0 in the end), but it doesn't worth the effort in regular cases. – lifecoder Jan 21 '19 at 9:37
9

simple...

array1 = [1,2,3];
array2 = [3,2,1];

expect(array1).toEqual(jasmine.arrayContaining(array2));
  • 5
    Nice answer! You also need to check that the lengths are equal, otherwise you'll have a false positive on [1,2,3,4] and [3,2,1]. – Kristian Hanekamp Mar 27 '19 at 17:05
7

jasmine version 2.8 and later has

jasmine.arrayWithExactContents()

Which expects that an array contains exactly the elements listed, in any order.

array1 = [1,2,3];
array2 = [3,2,1];
expect(array1).toEqual(jasmine.arrayWithExactContents(array2))

See https://jasmine.github.io/api/3.4/jasmine.html

1
//Compare arrays without order
//Example
//a1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
//a2 = [3, 2, 1, 5, 4]
//isEqual(a1, a2) -> true
//a1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
//a2 = [3, 2, 1, 5, 4, 6];
//isEqual(a1, a2) -> false


function isInArray(a, e) {
  for ( var i = a.length; i--; ) {
    if ( a[i] === e ) return true;
  }
  return false;
}

function isEqArrays(a1, a2) {
  if ( a1.length !== a2.length ) {
    return false;
  }
  for ( var i = a1.length; i--; ) {
    if ( !isInArray( a2, a1[i] ) ) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}
1

The jest-extended package provides us few assertions to simplify our tests, it's less verbose and for failing tests the error is more explicit.

For this case we could use toIncludeSameMembers

expect([{foo: "bar"}, {baz: "qux"}]).toIncludeSameMembers([{baz: "qux"}, {foo: "bar"}]);
0
function equal(arr1, arr2){
    return arr1.length === arr2.length
    &&
    arr1.every((item)=>{
        return arr2.indexOf(item) >-1
    }) 
    &&
    arr2.every((item)=>{
        return arr1.indexOf(item) >-1
    })
}

The idea here is to first determine if the length of the two arrays are same, then check if all elements are in the other's array.

  • This does not take into account the frequency of items: equal([1, 1, 2], [1, 2, 2]) returns true. – MarkMYoung Dec 13 '19 at 23:16
0

Here's a solution that will work for any number or arrays

https://gist.github.com/tvler/cc5b2a3f01543e1658b25ca567c078e4

const areUnsortedArraysEqual = (...arrs) =>
  arrs.every((arr, i, [first]) => !i || arr.length === first.length) &&
  arrs
    .map(arr =>
      arr.reduce(
        (map, item) => map.set(item, (map.get(item) || 0) + 1),
        new Map(),
      ),
    )
    .every(
      (map, i, [first]) =>
        !i ||
        [...first, ...map].every(([item]) => first.get(item) === map.get(item)),
    );

Some tests (a few answers to this question don't account for arrays with multiple items of the same value, so [1, 2, 2] and [1, 2] would incorrectly return true)

[1, 2] true
[1, 2], [1, 2] true
[1, 2], [1, 2], [1, 2] true
[1, 2], [2, 1] true
[1, 1, 2], [1, 2, 1] true
[1, 2], [1, 2, 3] false
[1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2] false
[1, 2, 2], [1, 2] false
[1, 1, 2], [1, 2, 2] false
[1, 2, 3], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3] false
0

This algorithm is great for arrays where each item is unique. If not, you can add in something to check for duplicates...

tests = [
  [ [1,0,1] , [0,1,1] ],
  [ [1,0,1] , [0,0,1] ], //breaks on this one...
  [ [2,3,3] , [2,2,3] ], //breaks on this one also...
  [ [1,2,3] , [2,1,3] ],
  [ [2,3,1] , [1,2,2] ],
  [ [2,2,1] , [1,3,2] ]
]

tests.forEach(function(test) {
  console.log('eqArraySets( '+test[0]+' , '+test[1]+' ) = '+eqArraySets( test[0] , test[1] ));
});


function eqArraySets(a, b) {
	if ( a.length !== b.length ) { return false; }
	for ( var i = a.length; i--; ) {
		if ( !(b.indexOf(a[i])>-1) ) { return false; }
		if ( !(a.indexOf(b[i])>-1) ) { return false; }
	}
	return true;
}

0

This approach has worse theoretical worst-case run-time performance, but, because it does not perform any writes on the array, it might be faster in many circumstances (haven't tested performance yet):

WARNING: As Torben pointed out in the comments, this approach only works if both arrays have unique (non-repeating) elements (just like several of the other answers here).

/**
 * Determine whether two arrays contain exactly the same elements, independent of order.
 * @see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/32103252/expect-arrays-to-be-equal-ignoring-order/48973444#48973444
 */
function cmpIgnoreOrder(a, b) {
  const { every, includes } = _;
  return a.length === b.length && every(a, v => includes(b, v));
}

// the following should be all true!
const results = [
  !!cmpIgnoreOrder([1,2,3], [3,1,2]),
  !!cmpIgnoreOrder([4,1,2,3], [3,4,1,2]),
  !!cmpIgnoreOrder([], []),
  !cmpIgnoreOrder([1,2,3], [3,4,1,2]),
  !cmpIgnoreOrder([1], []),
  !cmpIgnoreOrder([1, 3, 4], [3,4,5])
];

console.log('Results: ', results)
console.assert(_.reduce(results, (a, b) => a && b, true), 'Test did not pass!');
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.5/lodash.js"></script>

  • 1
    What do you mean when you say it creates lots of copies? Array#sort sorts arrays in-place. – philraj Aug 6 '18 at 20:31
  • 1
    Fails for these arrays: [1,1,2,3], [3,3,1,2]. – Torben Kohlmeier Nov 28 '18 at 9:09
  • 1
    @TorbenKohlmeier Thanks, I updated my answer (admitting defeat in regard to non-unique arrays) – Domi Nov 29 '18 at 3:21
0

There is currenly a matcher for this USE CASE:

https://github.com/jest-community/jest-extended/pull/122/files

test('passes when arrays match in a different order', () => {
  expect([1, 2, 3]).toMatchArray([3, 1, 2]);
  expect([{ foo: 'bar' }, { baz: 'qux' }]).toMatchArray([{ baz: 'qux' }, { foo: 'bar' }]);
});
0

You could use expect.arrayContaining(array) from standard jest:

  const expected = ['Alice', 'Bob'];
  it('matches even if received contains additional elements', () => {
    expect(['Alice', 'Bob', 'Eve']).toEqual(expect.arrayContaining(expected));
  });
-5

For what it's worth, in Jest you can do:

expect(new Set([1,2,3])).toEqual(new Set([3,2,1]))
  • This does not seem to work when the array elements are objects that needs to be compared for equality by checking all fields recursively – CrimsonCricket Mar 14 '18 at 12:14
  • 1
    Sure, it would only work for primitives (with reference equality). – raine Mar 15 '18 at 9:25
  • 2
    Be careful, this will not work in all cases! Example: new Set([1, 1, 2]) === new Set([1, 2]) – Druska May 1 '18 at 21:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.