How do I remove all non alphanumeric characters from a string except dash and space characters?

12 Answers 12

up vote 719 down vote accepted

Replace [^a-zA-Z0-9 -] with an empty string.

Regex rgx = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z0-9 -]");
str = rgx.Replace(str, "");
  • 63
    Worth mentioning that - must be at the end of the character class, or escaped with a backslash, to prevent being used for a range. – Peter Boughton Jul 9 '10 at 9:18
  • 6
    @Dan set the global flag in your regex - without that, it just replaces the first match. A quick google should tell you how to set global flag in classic ASP regex. Otherwise, look for a replaceAll function instead of replace. – Amarghosh Sep 22 '10 at 3:49
  • 17
    Here's a regex compiled version: return Regex.Replace(str, "[^a-zA-Z0-9_.]+", "", RegexOptions.Compiled); Same basic question – Paige Watson Sep 30 '11 at 16:35
  • 13
    @MGOwen because every time you use "" you are creating a new object due to strings being immutable. When you use string.empty you are reusing the single instance required for representing an empty string which is quicker as well as being more efficient. – Brian Scott Jun 18 '12 at 11:09
  • 17
    @BrianScott I know this is old, but was found in a search so I feel this is relevant. This actually depends on the version of .NET you are running under. > 2.0 uses "" & string.Empty exactly the same. stackoverflow.com/questions/151472/… – Jared Oct 23 '12 at 21:08

I could have used RegEx, they can provide elegant solution but they can cause performane issues. Here is one solution

char[] arr = str.ToCharArray();

arr = Array.FindAll<char>(arr, (c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) 
                                  || char.IsWhiteSpace(c) 
                                  || c == '-')));
str = new string(arr);

When using the compact framework (which doesn't have FindAll)

Replace FindAll with1

char[] arr = str.Where(c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || 
                             char.IsWhiteSpace(c) || 
                             c == '-')).ToArray(); 

str = new string(arr);

1 Comment by ShawnFeatherly

  • 36
    in my testing, this technique was much faster. to be precise, it was just under 3 times faster than the Regex Replace technique. – Dan Aug 11 '11 at 15:49
  • 28
    Also this handles unicode characters, not just US ASCII. – user755327 Sep 20 '11 at 13:16
  • 10
    The compact framework doesn't have FindAll, you can replace FindAll with char[] arr = str.Where(c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || char.IsWhiteSpace(c) || c == '-')).ToArray(); – ShawnFeatherly Jan 25 '13 at 22:14
  • has anyone tested this? That didn't work at all. --but this did for me: string str2 = new string(str.Where(c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c))).ToArray()); – KevinDeus Dec 16 '16 at 21:31

You can try:

   string s1= Regex.Replace(s,"[^A-Za-z0-9 _]","");

Where s is your string.

  • 1
    OP asked for dash not underscore – Sean B Apr 22 '17 at 21:02

Using System.Linq

string withOutSpecialCharacters = new string(stringWithSpecialCharacters.Where(c =>char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || char.IsWhiteSpace(c) || c == '-').ToArray());
  • 3
    This is the same as this answer from three years earlier. – Michael Mar 14 at 16:10

The regex is [^\w\s\-]*:

\s is better to use instead of space (), because there might be a tab in the text.

  • 1
    unless you want to remove tabs. – Matt Ellen Jul 9 '10 at 6:57
  • ...and newlines, and all other characters considered "whitespace". – Peter Boughton Jul 9 '10 at 9:17
  • 3
    This solution is far superior to the above solutions since it also supports international (non-English) characters. <!-- language: c# --> string s = "Mötley Crue 日本人: の氏名 and Kanji 愛 and Hiragana あい"; string r = Regex.Replace(s,"[^\\w\\s-]*",""); The above produces r with: Mötley Crue 日本人 の氏名 and Kanji 愛 and Hiragana あい – danglund Feb 3 '14 at 12:12
  • Use @ to escape \ conversion in string: @"[^\w\s-]*" – Jakub Pawlinski Feb 28 '14 at 11:45
  • 1
    it, uhhh... doesn't remove underscores? that is considered a "word" character by regex implementation across creation, but it's not alphanumeric, dash, or space... (?) – Code Jockey Nov 16 '15 at 14:22

Based on the answer for this question, I created a static class and added these. Thought it might be useful for some people.

public static class RegexConvert
{
    public static string ToAlphaNumericOnly(this string input)
    {
        Regex rgx = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z0-9]");
        return rgx.Replace(input, "");
    }

    public static string ToAlphaOnly(this string input)
    {
        Regex rgx = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z]");
        return rgx.Replace(input, "");
    }

    public static string ToNumericOnly(this string input)
    {
        Regex rgx = new Regex("[^0-9]");
        return rgx.Replace(input, "");
    }
}

Then the methods can be used as:

string example = "asdf1234!@#$";
string alphanumeric = example.ToAlphaNumericOnly();
string alpha = example.ToAlphaOnly();
string numeric = example.ToNumericOnly();
  • 1
    For the example that you provide it would also be useful if you provide the outcomes of each of the methods. – c-chavez Mar 25 at 18:56

I´ve made a different solution, by eliminating the Control characters, which was my original problem.

It is better than putting in a list all the "special but good" chars

char[] arr = str.Where(c => !char.IsControl(c)).ToArray();    
str = new string(arr);

it´s simpler, so I think it´s better !

Want something quick?

public static class StringExtensions 
{
    public static string ToAlphaNumeric(this string self, params char[] allowedCharacters)
    {
        return new string(Array.FindAll(self.ToCharArray(), c => char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || allowedCharacters.Contains(c)));
    }
}

This will allow you to specify which characters you want to allow as well.

Here is a non-regex heap allocation friendly fast solution which was what I was looking for.

Unsafe edition.

public static unsafe void ToAlphaNumeric(ref string input)
{
    fixed (char* p = input)
    {
        int offset = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            if (char.IsLetterOrDigit(p[i]))
            {
                p[offset] = input[i];
                offset++;
            }
        }
        ((int*)p)[-1] = offset; // Changes the length of the string
        p[offset] = '\0';
    }
}

And for those who don't want to use unsafe or don't trust the string length hack.

public static string ToAlphaNumeric(string input)
{
    int j = 0;
    char[] newCharArr = new char[input.Length];

    for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
    {
        if (char.IsLetterOrDigit(input[i]))
        {
            newCharArr[j] = input[i];
            j++;
        }
    }

    Array.Resize(ref newCharArr, j);

    return new string(newCharArr);
}

I use a variation of one of the answers here. I want to replace spaces with "-" so its SEO friendly and also make lower case. Also not reference system.web from my services layer.

private string MakeUrlString(string input)
{
    var array = input.ToCharArray();

    array = Array.FindAll<char>(array, c => char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || char.IsWhiteSpace(c) || c == '-');

    var newString = new string(array).Replace(" ", "-").ToLower();
    return newString;
}

Here's an extension method using @ata answer as inspiration.

"hello-world123, 456".MakeAlphaNumeric(new char[]{'-'});// yields "hello-world123456"

or if you require additional characters other than hyphen...

"hello-world123, 456!?".MakeAlphaNumeric(new char[]{'-','!'});// yields "hello-world123456!"


public static class StringExtensions
{   
    public static string MakeAlphaNumeric(this string input, params char[] exceptions)
    {
        var charArray = input.ToCharArray();
        var alphaNumeric = Array.FindAll<char>(charArray, (c => char.IsLetterOrDigit(c)|| exceptions?.Contains(c) == true));
        return new string(alphaNumeric);
    }
}

There is a much easier way with Regex.

private string FixString(string str)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) ? str : Regex.Replace(str, "[\\D]", "");
}
  • 1
    only replaces non numeric characters – frostymarvelous Aug 28 '17 at 12:36

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