91

I want to make a simple neural network which uses the ReLU function. Can someone give me a clue of how can I implement the function using numpy.

9 Answers 9

158

There are a couple of ways.

>>> x = np.random.random((3, 2)) - 0.5
>>> x
array([[-0.00590765,  0.18932873],
       [-0.32396051,  0.25586596],
       [ 0.22358098,  0.02217555]])
>>> np.maximum(x, 0)
array([[ 0.        ,  0.18932873],
       [ 0.        ,  0.25586596],
       [ 0.22358098,  0.02217555]])
>>> x * (x > 0)
array([[-0.        ,  0.18932873],
       [-0.        ,  0.25586596],
       [ 0.22358098,  0.02217555]])
>>> (abs(x) + x) / 2
array([[ 0.        ,  0.18932873],
       [ 0.        ,  0.25586596],
       [ 0.22358098,  0.02217555]])

If timing the results with the following code:

import numpy as np

x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
print("max method:")
%timeit -n10 np.maximum(x, 0)

print("multiplication method:")
%timeit -n10 x * (x > 0)

print("abs method:")
%timeit -n10 (abs(x) + x) / 2

We get:

max method:
10 loops, best of 3: 239 ms per loop
multiplication method:
10 loops, best of 3: 145 ms per loop
abs method:
10 loops, best of 3: 288 ms per loop

So the multiplication seems to be the fastest.

4
  • 27
    +1. I took the liberty to add some timeit results to your answer. Please feel free to edit them or revert the edit if you wish.
    – IVlad
    Aug 20, 2015 at 9:17
  • 11
    np.maximum(x, 0, x) runs fastest here.
    – Daniel S.
    May 29, 2016 at 17:37
  • 3
    @DanielS. For the future reader: The last x in maximum(x, 0, x) means "please change x in place rather than allocating a new matrix". (source)
    – ynn
    Jul 2, 2020 at 11:13
  • 1
    @DanielS. if in-place ops are an option, then there are faster in-place ops as pointed out in Tobias's response.
    – Sid
    Jul 4, 2020 at 18:49
48

I'm completely revising my original answer because of points raised in the other questions and comments. Here is the new benchmark script:

import time
import numpy as np


def fancy_index_relu(m):
    m[m < 0] = 0


relus = {
    "max": lambda x: np.maximum(x, 0),
    "in-place max": lambda x: np.maximum(x, 0, x),
    "mul": lambda x: x * (x > 0),
    "abs": lambda x: (abs(x) + x) / 2,
    "fancy index": fancy_index_relu,
}

for name, relu in relus.items():
    n_iter = 20
    x = np.random.random((n_iter, 5000, 5000)) - 0.5

    t1 = time.time()
    for i in range(n_iter):
        relu(x[i])
    t2 = time.time()

    print("{:>12s}  {:3.0f} ms".format(name, (t2 - t1) / n_iter * 1000))

It takes care to use a different ndarray for each implementation and iteration. Here are the results:

         max  126 ms
in-place max  107 ms
         mul  136 ms
         abs   86 ms
 fancy index  132 ms
4
  • 6
    How does np.maximum(x,0,x) take less time compared to np.maximum(0,x) ? Jan 13, 2017 at 20:05
  • 5
    also worth noting that this will modify x
    – Andrea
    Feb 27, 2017 at 10:44
  • 8
    @pikachuchameleon It is faster because it is in-place. The return value of np.maximum(x, 0, x) is ignored and the result is directly written to x.
    – Lenar Hoyt
    Jun 17, 2017 at 17:48
  • 2
    If in-place ops are an option, then there are faster in-place ops as pointed out in Tobias's response.
    – Sid
    Jul 4, 2020 at 18:49
43

You can do it in much easier way:

def ReLU(x):
    return x * (x > 0)

def dReLU(x):
    return 1. * (x > 0)
3
  • Thanks. I found this to be faster than the fancy index method. @Shital Shah Could you please explain this syntax more or share some links? Feb 2, 2020 at 7:26
  • 1
    It's just broadcasting and element-wise multiplication. The 0 will automatically be turned in to same size as tensor x. The bool result will be turned in to 0 or 1 and then will get multiplied elementwise. There is no magic :). Feb 2, 2020 at 8:03
  • the derivative should be 1. * ( x >= 0) Mar 12 at 10:30
37

EDIT As jirassimok has mentioned below my function will change the data in place, after that it runs a lot faster in timeit. This causes the good results. It's some kind of cheating. Sorry for your inconvenience.

I found a faster method for ReLU with numpy. You can use the fancy index feature of numpy as well.

fancy index:

20.3 ms ± 272 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

>>> x = np.random.random((5,5)) - 0.5 
>>> x
array([[-0.21444316, -0.05676216,  0.43956365, -0.30788116, -0.19952038],
       [-0.43062223,  0.12144647, -0.05698369, -0.32187085,  0.24901568],
       [ 0.06785385, -0.43476031, -0.0735933 ,  0.3736868 ,  0.24832288],
       [ 0.47085262, -0.06379623,  0.46904916, -0.29421609, -0.15091168],
       [ 0.08381359, -0.25068492, -0.25733763, -0.1852205 , -0.42816953]])
>>> x[x<0]=0
>>> x
array([[ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.43956365,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.12144647,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.24901568],
       [ 0.06785385,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.3736868 ,  0.24832288],
       [ 0.47085262,  0.        ,  0.46904916,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.08381359,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ]])

Here is my benchmark:

import numpy as np
x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
print("max method:")
%timeit -n10 np.maximum(x, 0)
print("max inplace method:")
%timeit -n10 np.maximum(x, 0,x)
print("multiplication method:")
%timeit -n10 x * (x > 0)
print("abs method:")
%timeit -n10 (abs(x) + x) / 2
print("fancy index:")
%timeit -n10 x[x<0] =0

max method:
241 ms ± 3.53 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
max inplace method:
38.5 ms ± 4 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
multiplication method:
162 ms ± 3.1 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
abs method:
181 ms ± 4.18 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
fancy index:
20.3 ms ± 272 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
3
  • 2
    (+1) Your fancy method is the only method I have actually seen used before! It's not only efficient, but also perfectly describes the ReLU operation, in my opinion.
    – n1k31t4
    Jul 5, 2018 at 22:13
  • 3
    This method is only faster than the others when the array has no negative numbers; your test seems fast because timeit modifies the array, so after the first loop, there are no negatives left and it runs faster. In a test that re-generated the array each time, the logical indexing assignment (a[a < 0] = 0) performed worst of the methods, with np.maximum doing best.
    – jirassimok
    Feb 9, 2020 at 7:32
  • 1
    @jirassimok you are right. My function will modify the data in place. And after one run it will be a lot faster. I will change my post
    – Tobias
    Jul 13, 2020 at 7:38
7

Richard Möhn's comparison is not fair.
As Andrea Di Biagio's comment, the in-place method np.maximum(x, 0, x) will modify x at the first loop.

So here is my benchmark:

import numpy as np

def baseline():
    x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
    return x

def relu_mul():
    x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
    out = x * (x > 0)
    return out

def relu_max():
    x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
    out = np.maximum(x, 0)
    return out

def relu_max_inplace():
    x = np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5
    np.maximum(x, 0, x)
    return x 

Timing it:

print("baseline:")
%timeit -n10 baseline()
print("multiplication method:")
%timeit -n10 relu_mul()
print("max method:")
%timeit -n10 relu_max()
print("max inplace method:")
%timeit -n10 relu_max_inplace()

Get the results:

baseline:
10 loops, best of 3: 425 ms per loop
multiplication method:
10 loops, best of 3: 596 ms per loop
max method:
10 loops, best of 3: 682 ms per loop
max inplace method:
10 loops, best of 3: 602 ms per loop

In-place maximum method is only a bit faster than the maximum method, and it may because it omits the variable assignment for 'out'. And it's still slower than the multiplication method.
And since you're implementing the ReLU func. You may have to save the 'x' for backprop through relu. E.g.:

def relu_backward(dout, cache):
    x = cache
    dx = np.where(x > 0, dout, 0)
    return dx

So i recommend you to use multiplication method.

4
  • Why does your benchmark show that relu_mul is fastest, but you sayrelu_max_inplace is slightly faster? Also, why do you initialise the test matrix in each function and no just once at the beginning for each method? Your timings now include time taken to create a matrix with 5000*5000 = 25000000 elements - roughly 200 Mb in size if default float64 is used. %timeit np.random.random((5000, 5000)) - 0.5 gives 273 ms ± 7.95 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each). That is over a third of the actual timings you posted.
    – n1k31t4
    Jul 1, 2018 at 15:16
  • @n1k31t4 First, i say relu_max_inplace is slighter faster than relu_max, but the most recommended method is relu_mul.
    – ivanpp
    Sep 14, 2018 at 5:35
  • 1
    I add the initialise func np.random.random() intentionally, because if i don't do this, relu_max_inplace method will seem to be extremly fast, like @Richard Möhn 's result. @Richard Möhn 's result shows that relu_max_inplace vs relu_max is 38.4ms vs 238ms per loop. It's just because the in_place method will only be excuted once. And initialise the matrix in each loop will avoid this situation. The comparison will be fair.
    – ivanpp
    Sep 14, 2018 at 9:54
  • 1
    @ivanpp I'm not sure including the random generation op in timing results is fair at all.
    – Sid
    Jul 4, 2020 at 18:45
1

If we have 3 parameters (t0, a0, a1) for Relu, that is we want to implement

if x > t0:
    x = x * a1
else:
    x = x * a0

We can use the following code:

X = X * (X > t0) * a1 +  X * (X < t0) * a0

X there is a matrix.

1

numpy didn't have the function of relu, but you define it by yourself as follow:

def relu(x):
    return np.maximum(0, x)

for example:

arr = np.array([[-1,2,3],[1,2,3]])

ret = relu(arr)
print(ret) # print [[0 2 3] [1 2 3]]
1

ReLU(x) also is equal to (x+abs(x))/2

-3

This is more precise implementation:

def ReLU(x):
    return abs(x) * (x > 0)
1
  • 2
    Why? The abs is unnecessary given that your stamping out all the negative components. May 2, 2019 at 12:40

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