30

I want to invert a matrix without using numpy.linalg.inv.

The reason is that I am using Numba to speed up the code, but numpy.linalg.inv is not supported, so I am wondering if I can invert a matrix with 'classic' Python code.

With numpy.linalg.inv an example code would look like that:

import numpy as np
M = np.array([[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]])
Minv = np.linalg.inv(M)
3
  • 1
    Probably not. There's no python "builtin" doing that for you and programming a matrix inversion yourself is anything but easy (see e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… for a probably incomplete list of methods). I'm also not aware of any numpy-independent linear algebra package for python... – sebastian Aug 20 '15 at 9:14
  • If you want to invert 3x3 matrices only, you can look up the formula here. (You better specify the dimension and type of matrices you want to invert. In your example you use the most trivial identity matrix. Are they real? And regular?) – Falko Aug 20 '15 at 9:17
  • To be precise is a 4x4 real matrix – Alessandro Vianello Aug 20 '15 at 9:25
67

Here is a more elegant and scalable solution, imo. It'll work for any nxn matrix and you may find use for the other methods. Note that getMatrixInverse(m) takes in an array of arrays as input. Please feel free to ask any questions.

def transposeMatrix(m):
    return map(list,zip(*m))

def getMatrixMinor(m,i,j):
    return [row[:j] + row[j+1:] for row in (m[:i]+m[i+1:])]

def getMatrixDeternminant(m):
    #base case for 2x2 matrix
    if len(m) == 2:
        return m[0][0]*m[1][1]-m[0][1]*m[1][0]

    determinant = 0
    for c in range(len(m)):
        determinant += ((-1)**c)*m[0][c]*getMatrixDeternminant(getMatrixMinor(m,0,c))
    return determinant

def getMatrixInverse(m):
    determinant = getMatrixDeternminant(m)
    #special case for 2x2 matrix:
    if len(m) == 2:
        return [[m[1][1]/determinant, -1*m[0][1]/determinant],
                [-1*m[1][0]/determinant, m[0][0]/determinant]]

    #find matrix of cofactors
    cofactors = []
    for r in range(len(m)):
        cofactorRow = []
        for c in range(len(m)):
            minor = getMatrixMinor(m,r,c)
            cofactorRow.append(((-1)**(r+c)) * getMatrixDeternminant(minor))
        cofactors.append(cofactorRow)
    cofactors = transposeMatrix(cofactors)
    for r in range(len(cofactors)):
        for c in range(len(cofactors)):
            cofactors[r][c] = cofactors[r][c]/determinant
    return cofactors
10
  • 1
    This works perfectly. According to the requirement, should be the accepted answer. The only minor change required is in #base case for 2x2 matrix. you need to explicitly convert to float. – Aju Antony Jun 9 '17 at 7:14
  • 1
    If the matrix is not square the transpose function will give an error, to find the transpose for a list simply we can do: zip(*theArray) Taken from: stackoverflow.com/questions/4937491/matrix-transpose-in-python – Mohanad Kaleia Nov 8 '17 at 18:59
  • 2
    @MohanadKaleia you're right, thanks. Although non square matrices don't have inverses, I do claim my answer is composed of reusable pieces so i've fixed the transpose function as per your suggestion. – stackPusher Nov 10 '17 at 7:19
  • 3
    @stackPusher this is tremendous. I wish I could upvote more than once – fermi Jul 26 '18 at 22:23
  • 3
    If you're using python3, then you need to define transposeMatrix as list(map(list,zip(*m))) instead of map(list,zip(*m)) – TheChetan Aug 18 '20 at 5:44
8

As of at least July 16, 2018 Numba has a fast matrix inverse. (You can see how they overload the standard NumPy inverse and other operations here.)

Here are the results of my benchmarking:

import numpy as np
from scipy import linalg as sla
from scipy import linalg as nla
import numba

def gen_ex(d0):
  x = np.random.randn(d0,d0)
  return x.T + x

@numba.jit
def inv_nla_jit(A):
  return np.linalg.inv(A)

@numba.jit
def inv_sla_jit(A):
  return sla.inv(A)

For small matrices it is particularly fast:

ex1 = gen_ex(4)
%timeit inv_nla_jit(ex1) # NumPy + Numba
%timeit inv_sla_jit(ex1) # SciPy + Numba
%timeit nla.inv(ex1)     # NumPy
%timeit sla.inv(ex1)     # SciPy

[Out]

2.54 µs ± 467 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
67.3 µs ± 9.18 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
63.5 µs ± 7.65 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
56.6 µs ± 5.03 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

Notice that the speedup only works for NumPy inverse, not SciPy (as expected).

Slightly larger matrix:

ex2 = gen_ex(40)
%timeit inv_nla_jit(ex2) # NumPy + Numba
%timeit inv_sla_jit(ex2) # SciPy + Numba
%timeit nla.inv(ex2)     # NumPy
%timeit sla.inv(ex2)     # SciPy

[Out]

131 µs ± 12.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
278 µs ± 26.2 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
231 µs ± 24.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
189 µs ± 11.2 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

So there's still a speedup here but SciPy is catching up.

4

Here is another way, using gaussian elimination instead:

def eliminate(r1, r2, col, target=0):
    fac = (r2[col]-target) / r1[col]
    for i in range(len(r2)):
        r2[i] -= fac * r1[i]

def gauss(a):
    for i in range(len(a)):
        if a[i][i] == 0:
            for j in range(i+1, len(a)):
                if a[i][j] != 0:
                    a[i], a[j] = a[j], a[i]
                    break
            else:
                raise ValueError("Matrix is not invertible")
        for j in range(i+1, len(a)):
            eliminate(a[i], a[j], i)
    for i in range(len(a)-1, -1, -1):
        for j in range(i-1, -1, -1):
            eliminate(a[i], a[j], i)
    for i in range(len(a)):
        eliminate(a[i], a[i], i, target=1)
    return a

def inverse(a):
    tmp = [[] for _ in a]
    for i,row in enumerate(a):
        assert len(row) == len(a)
        tmp[i].extend(row + [0]*i + [1] + [0]*(len(a)-i-1))
    gauss(tmp)
    ret = []
    for i in range(len(tmp)):
        ret.append(tmp[i][len(tmp[i])//2:])
    return ret
4
  • 3
    I required this technique to solve a Markov chain. – quartarian Dec 27 '20 at 12:07
  • Ha! That was the reason I made this as well – Asad-ullah Khan Dec 28 '20 at 15:32
  • 1
    foobar challenge? 👀 – luizfls Mar 12 at 14:52
  • yup you got it! – Asad-ullah Khan Mar 13 at 17:38
3

For a 4 x 4 matrix it's probably just about OK to use the mathematical formula, which you can find using Googling "formula for 4 by 4 matrix inverse". For example here (I can't vouch for its accuracy):

http://www.cg.info.hiroshima-cu.ac.jp/~miyazaki/knowledge/teche23.html

In general inverting a general matrix is not for the faint-hearted. You have to be aware of all the mathematically difficult cases and know why they won't apply to your usage, and catch them when you are supplied with mathematically pathological inputs (that, or return results of low accuracy or numerical garbage in the knowledge that it won't matter in your usage case provided you don't actually end up dividing by zero or overflowing MAXFLOAT ... which you might catch with an exception handler and present as "Error: matrix is singular or very close thereto").

It's generally better as a programmer to use library code written by numerical mathematics experts, unless you are willing to spend time understanding the physical and mathematical nature of the particular problem that you are addressing and become your own mathematics expert in your own specialist field.

0
0

Inverse matrix of 3x3 without numpy [python3]

import pprint


def inverse_3X3_matrix():
    I_Q_list = [[0, 1, 1],
                [2, 3, -1],
                [-1, 2, 1]]
    det_ = I_Q_list[0][0] * (
            (I_Q_list[1][1] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[1][2] * I_Q_list[2][1])) - \
           I_Q_list[0][1] * (
                   (I_Q_list[1][0] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[1][2] * I_Q_list[2][0])) + \
           I_Q_list[0][2] * (
                   (I_Q_list[1][0] * I_Q_list[2][1]) - (I_Q_list[1][1] * I_Q_list[2][0]))
    co_fctr_1 = [(I_Q_list[1][1] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[1][2] * I_Q_list[2][1]),
                 -((I_Q_list[1][0] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[1][2] * I_Q_list[2][0])),
                 (I_Q_list[1][0] * I_Q_list[2][1]) - (I_Q_list[1][1] * I_Q_list[2][0])]

    co_fctr_2 = [-((I_Q_list[0][1] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[0][2] * I_Q_list[2][1])),
                 (I_Q_list[0][0] * I_Q_list[2][2]) - (I_Q_list[0][2] * I_Q_list[2][0]),
                 -((I_Q_list[0][0] * I_Q_list[2][1]) - (I_Q_list[0][1] * I_Q_list[2][0]))]

    co_fctr_3 = [(I_Q_list[0][1] * I_Q_list[1][2]) - (I_Q_list[0][2] * I_Q_list[1][1]),
                 -((I_Q_list[0][0] * I_Q_list[1][2]) - (I_Q_list[0][2] * I_Q_list[1][0])),
                 (I_Q_list[0][0] * I_Q_list[1][1]) - (I_Q_list[0][1] * I_Q_list[1][0])]

    inv_list = [[1 / det_ * (co_fctr_1[0]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_2[0]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_3[0])],
                [1 / det_ * (co_fctr_1[1]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_2[1]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_3[1])],
                [1 / det_ * (co_fctr_1[2]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_2[2]), 1 / det_ * (co_fctr_3[2])]]

    pprint.pprint(inv_list)


inverse_3X3_matrix()
-6

I used the formula from http://cg.info.hiroshima-cu.ac.jp/~miyazaki/knowledge/teche23.html to write the function that does the inversion of a 4x4 matrix:

import numpy as np

def myInverse(A):
    detA = np.linalg.det(A)

    b00 = A[1,1]*A[2,2]*A[3,3] + A[1,2]*A[2,3]*A[3,1] + A[1,3]*A[2,1]*A[3,2] - A[1,1]*A[2,3]*A[3,2] - A[1,2]*A[2,1]*A[3,3] - A[1,3]*A[2,2]*A[3,1]
    b01 = A[0,1]*A[2,3]*A[3,2] + A[0,2]*A[2,1]*A[3,3] + A[0,3]*A[2,2]*A[3,1] - A[0,1]*A[2,2]*A[3,3] - A[0,2]*A[2,3]*A[3,1] - A[0,3]*A[2,1]*A[3,2]
    b02 = A[0,1]*A[1,2]*A[3,3] + A[0,2]*A[1,3]*A[3,1] + A[0,3]*A[1,1]*A[3,2] - A[0,1]*A[1,3]*A[3,2] - A[0,2]*A[1,1]*A[3,3] - A[0,3]*A[1,2]*A[3,1]
    b03 = A[0,1]*A[1,3]*A[2,2] + A[0,2]*A[1,1]*A[2,3] + A[0,3]*A[1,2]*A[2,1] - A[0,1]*A[1,2]*A[2,3] - A[0,2]*A[1,3]*A[2,1] - A[0,3]*A[1,1]*A[2,2]

    b10 = A[1,0]*A[2,3]*A[3,2] + A[1,2]*A[2,0]*A[3,3] + A[1,3]*A[2,2]*A[3,0] - A[1,0]*A[2,2]*A[3,3] - A[1,2]*A[2,3]*A[3,0] - A[1,3]*A[2,0]*A[3,2]
    b11 = A[0,0]*A[2,2]*A[3,3] + A[0,2]*A[2,3]*A[3,0] + A[0,3]*A[2,0]*A[3,2] - A[0,0]*A[2,3]*A[3,2] - A[0,2]*A[2,0]*A[3,3] - A[0,3]*A[2,2]*A[3,0]
    b12 = A[0,0]*A[1,3]*A[3,2] + A[0,2]*A[1,0]*A[3,3] + A[0,3]*A[1,2]*A[3,0] - A[0,0]*A[1,2]*A[3,3] - A[0,2]*A[1,3]*A[3,0] - A[0,3]*A[1,0]*A[3,2]
    b13 = A[0,0]*A[1,2]*A[2,3] + A[0,2]*A[1,3]*A[2,0] + A[0,3]*A[1,0]*A[2,2] - A[0,0]*A[1,3]*A[2,2] - A[0,2]*A[1,0]*A[2,3] - A[0,3]*A[1,2]*A[2,0]

    b20 = A[1,0]*A[2,1]*A[3,3] + A[1,1]*A[2,3]*A[3,0] + A[1,3]*A[2,0]*A[3,1] - A[1,0]*A[2,3]*A[3,1] - A[1,1]*A[2,0]*A[3,3] - A[1,3]*A[2,1]*A[3,0]
    b21 = A[0,0]*A[2,3]*A[3,1] + A[0,1]*A[2,0]*A[3,3] + A[0,3]*A[2,1]*A[3,0] - A[0,0]*A[2,1]*A[3,3] - A[0,1]*A[2,3]*A[3,0] - A[0,3]*A[2,0]*A[3,1]
    b22 = A[0,0]*A[1,1]*A[3,3] + A[0,1]*A[1,3]*A[3,0] + A[0,3]*A[1,0]*A[3,1] - A[0,0]*A[1,3]*A[3,1] - A[0,1]*A[1,0]*A[3,3] - A[0,3]*A[1,1]*A[3,0]
    b23 = A[0,0]*A[1,3]*A[2,1] + A[0,1]*A[1,0]*A[2,3] + A[0,3]*A[1,1]*A[2,0] - A[0,0]*A[1,1]*A[2,3] - A[0,1]*A[1,3]*A[2,0] - A[0,3]*A[1,0]*A[2,1]

    b30 = A[1,0]*A[2,2]*A[3,1] + A[1,1]*A[2,0]*A[3,2] + A[1,2]*A[2,1]*A[3,0] - A[1,0]*A[2,1]*A[3,2] - A[1,1]*A[2,2]*A[3,0] - A[1,2]*A[2,0]*A[3,1]
    b31 = A[0,0]*A[2,1]*A[3,2] + A[0,1]*A[2,2]*A[3,0] + A[0,2]*A[2,0]*A[3,1] - A[0,0]*A[2,2]*A[3,1] - A[0,1]*A[2,0]*A[3,2] - A[0,2]*A[2,1]*A[3,0]
    b32 = A[0,0]*A[1,2]*A[3,1] + A[0,1]*A[1,0]*A[3,2] + A[0,2]*A[1,1]*A[3,0] - A[0,0]*A[1,1]*A[3,2] - A[0,1]*A[1,2]*A[3,0] - A[0,2]*A[1,0]*A[3,1]
    b33 = A[0,0]*A[1,1]*A[2,2] + A[0,1]*A[1,2]*A[2,0] + A[0,2]*A[1,0]*A[2,1] - A[0,0]*A[1,2]*A[2,1] - A[0,1]*A[1,0]*A[2,2] - A[0,2]*A[1,1]*A[2,0]

    Ainv = np.array([[b00, b01, b02, b03], [b10, b11, b12, b13], [b20, b21, b22, b23], [b30, b31, b32, b33]]) / detA

return Ainv
3
  • 19
    You don't want to use np.linalg.inv but np.linalg.det is fine? That's a really awkward requirement... – sebastian Aug 20 '15 at 11:15
  • 2
    Of course one needs to write another 'brute force' implementation for the determinant calculation as well. Or just calculate the det outside the Numba function and pass it as an argument – Alessandro Vianello Aug 20 '15 at 12:27
  • @sebastian np.linalg.inv is not accurate – Sayan Dey Apr 24 at 11:52

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