60

I have a structure which I create a custom constructor to initialize the members to 0's. I've seen in older compilers that when in release mode, without doing a memset to 0, the values are not initialized.

I now want to use this structure in a union, but get errors because it has a non-trivial constructor.

So, question 1. Does the default compiler implemented constructor guarantee that all members of a structure will be null initialized? The non-trivial constructor just does a memset of all the members to '0' to ensure a clean structure.

Question 2: If a constructor must be specified on the base structure, how can a union be implemented to contain that element and ensure a 0 initialized base element?

6 Answers 6

52

Question 1: Default constructors do initialize POD members to 0 according to the C++ standard. See the quoted text below.

Question 2: If a constructor must be specified in a base class, then that class cannot be part of a union.

Finally, you can provide a constructor for your union:

union U 
{
   A a;
   B b;

   U() { memset( this, 0, sizeof( U ) ); }
};

For Q1:

From C++03, 12.1 Constructors, pg 190

The implicitly-defined default constructor performs the set of initializations of the class that would be performed by a user-written default constructor for that class with an empty mem-initializer-list (12.6.2) and an empty function body.

From C++03, 8.5 Initializers, pg 145

To default-initialize an object of type T means:

  • if T is a non-POD class type (clause 9), the default constructor for T is called (and the initialization is ill-formed if T has no accessible default constructor);
  • if T is an array type, each element is default-initialized;
  • otherwise, the object is zero-initialized.

To zero-initialize an object of type T means:

  • if T is a scalar type (3.9), the object is set to the value of 0 (zero) converted to T;
  • if T is a non-union class type, each non static data member and each base-class subobject is zero-initialized;
  • if T is a union type, the object’s first named data member is zero-initialized;
  • if T is an array type, each element is zero-initialized;
  • if T is a reference type, no initialization is performed.

For Q2:

From C++03, 12.1 Constructors, pg 190

A constructor is trivial if it is an implicitly-declared default constructor and if:

  • its class has no virtual functions (10.3) and no virtual base classes (10.1), and
  • all the direct base classes of its class have trivial constructors, and
  • for all the nonstatic data members of its class that are of class type (or array thereof), each such class has a trivial constructor

From C++03, 9.5 Unions, pg 162

A union can have member functions (including constructors and destructors), but not virtual (10.3) functions. A union shall not have base classes. A union shall not be used as a base class.An object of a class with a non-trivial constructor (12.1), a non-trivial copy constructor (12.8), a non-trivial destructor (12.4), or a non-trivial copy assignment operator (13.5.3, 12.8) cannot be a member of a union, nor can an array of such objects

2
  • 23
    What's missing here is that despite the name, default constructors do not default-initialize POD members. 12.6.2/4 says what happens when a member is not mentioned in an initializer list, and by your quote from 12.1, this applies to implicit ctors. It says, "If the entity is a non-static data member of ... class type ... and the entity class is a non-POD class, the entity is default-initialized ... otherwise, the entity is not initialized". So, POD data members are not initialized by the implicitly-generated constructor. Non-POD data members are default-initialized. Dec 22, 2009 at 2:25
  • 3
    this answer is out of date..see my answer for C++11 below
    – dan-man
    Oct 22, 2015 at 20:21
40

Things changed for the better in C++11.

You can now legally do this, as described by Stroustrup himself (I reached that link from the Wikipedia article on C++11).

The example on Wikipedia is as follows:

#include <new> // Required for placement 'new'.

struct Point {
    Point() {}
    Point(int x, int y): x_(x), y_(y) {}
    int x_, y_;
};

union U {
    int z;
    double w;
    Point p; // Illegal in C++03; legal in C++11.
    U() {new(&p) Point();} // Due to the Point member, a constructor
                           // definition is now *required*.
};

Stroustrup goes into a little more detail.

23
  • 1
    Technically your advice a constructor is required is not correct. Like any other member it is only required if it is used. Raw storage could be initialised to either an int, double, or Point, and then a pointer to U could be used to access it (followed by the appropriate field name). Example uses include interpreting a stream of objects, emulating a stack, or simply interpreting a value allocated on the heap.
    – Yttrill
    May 19, 2016 at 13:20
  • @Yttrill while it's true that you don't need to define a constructor unless you construct an instance of U, I don't believe it's legal to use a U * to access any member of the union if no union object has been constructed. [basic.life] Before the lifetime of an object has started but after the storage which the object will occupy has been allocated [...] any pointer that refers to the storage location [...] may be dereferenced but [...]. The program has undefined behavior if [...] the pointer is used to access a non-static data member or call a non-static member function of the object
    – davmac
    Nov 11, 2016 at 15:42
  • @davmac: its tricky. Certain aliases allow things you wouldn't expect from a naive reading, esp considering the strict aliasing rules. The C committee also made a mistake restricting the layout of integral types, allows one to prove things are valid that otherwise wouldn't be. If you combine these rules you end up with contradictions in the standards. Potentially legal aliases include integers and unsigned integers of the same size with a shared common value, uintptr_t and any pointer, unsigned char and anything at all, and any suitably large unsigned integer and any store, initialised or no.
    – Yttrill
    Dec 4, 2016 at 3:50
  • @Yttrill layout alone does not allow aliasing where it is otherwise invalid. Using a union pointer to access a field member is not just accessing a member; the union object is also accessed, and that is what is problematic in this case; if there's no suitable constructor available, then it must be illegal as per the paragraph quoted above.
    – davmac
    Dec 4, 2016 at 10:39
  • @Yttrill (or rather, when there is no union object, access via the union member operator is access via the union type, and that cannot alias arbitrarily with its member types, at least according to the GCC developers' standpoint and I think various others).
    – davmac
    Dec 4, 2016 at 12:03
2

As mentioned in Greg Rogers' comment to unwesen's post, you can give your union a constructor (and destructor if you wish):

struct foo
{
    int a;
    int b;
};

union bar
{
    bar() { memset(this, 0, sizeof(*this)); }

    int a;
    foo f;
};
2
  • 1
    Looks like I need some education. Wouldn't memsetting the object to zero, wipe out the classes virtual table?
    – EvilTeach
    Nov 26, 2008 at 21:25
  • 5
    @EvilTeach, Two things, 1) you don't have to use a vtable to implement polymorphism (except everybody does). 2) Do you see any virtual methods on foo? Or any methods at all for that matter?. Does it inherit from anything? There's no vtable without virtual methods. In fact, were foo to have virtual methods and by extension a vtable it would no longer be a POD, and therefore ineligible for membership in the union. Jul 15, 2009 at 0:05
2

AFAIK union members may not have constructors or destructors.

Question 1: no, there's no such guarantee. Any POD-member not in the constructor's initialization list gets default-initialized, but that's with a constructor you define, and has an initializer list. If you don't define a constructor, or you define a constructor without an initializer list and empty body, POD-members will not be initialized.

Non-POD members will always be constructed via their default constructor, which if synthesized, again would not initialize POD-members. Given that union members may not have constructors, you'd pretty much be guaranteed that POD-members of structs in a union will not be initialized.

Question 2: you can always initialize structures/unions like so:

struct foo
{
    int a;
    int b;
};

union bar
{
    int a;
    foo f;
};

bar b = { 0 };
5
  • 2
    You can give the union itself a constructor that memset's itself to zero. Nov 26, 2008 at 17:29
  • Good point! I keep forgetting about union constructors myself!
    – unwesen
    Nov 26, 2008 at 17:36
  • 1
    There is no difference between a programmers default constructor with no initializer list and empty body and a compiler generated constructor. Nov 26, 2008 at 19:50
  • @dribeas: thank you, I didn't write that very clearly, and updated my answer accordingly.
    – unwesen
    Nov 26, 2008 at 20:18
  • 1
    One difference is that the former renders the class non-POD, whereas the latter doesn't. Nov 26, 2008 at 20:20
0

Can you do something like this?

class Outer
{
public:
    Outer()
    {
        memset(&inner_, 0, sizeof(inner_));
    }
private:
    union Inner
    {
        int qty_;
        double price_;
    } inner_;
};

...or maybe something like this?

union MyUnion
{
    int qty_;
    double price_;
};

void someFunction()
{
    MyUnion u = {0};
}
1
  • We had considered that, but the structure we attempted to put in the union is in use in other parts of the code, so removing the constructor(assuming the compiler treats the struct as POD and doesn't intialize all elements to 0) could break code which depends on that. Nov 26, 2008 at 17:08
-3

You'll have to wait for C++0x to be supported by compilers to get this. Until then, sorry.

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