4

As the title suggests, I am having trouble logging users in, after hashing their passwords in the signup form. I have used PHP's built in password_hash() and password_verify() functions, but its on signin.php, where password_verify() is used that I am having trouble. I know that a parameter to password_verify() is a hash, but how do I use the same hash generated and stored in signup.php, to be able to use in this function?

NOTE: Yes there is more to both of these sets of code! Database connection works, all variables not defined in these bits ARE defined some lines up. signup.php works perfectly and the form data, including the hashed password are successfully stored in my database.

here is the part of signup.php where the hash is implemented:

    $hash = password_hash($password, PASSWORD_DEFAULT);
    $sql = "INSERT INTO users (id, full_name, email, password, username, sign_up_date, activated) VALUES ('', '$full_name', '$email', '$hash', '$username', '$date', '1')";

and here is the part of signin.php where the (presumably same) hash is needed: $password = mysqli_real_escape_string($_POST['password']);

if (!password_verify($password, $hash)) {
    echo 'Invalid password.';
    exit;
}

$sql = "SELECT id, email, password FROM users WHERE email = '$email' AND password = '$password' AND activated = '1' LIMIT 1";
$query = mysqli_query($conn, $sql);

EDIT: I figured this out myself a day later, had to retrieve the stored hash from database using "SELECT * FROM...", and then compare that with the entered password with password_verify(). Thanks for the help nonetheless!

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  • 3
    Where do you select the hash from the DB again?
    – Sirko
    Aug 21 '15 at 21:23
  • 1
    During the sign in process, first sanitize your $_POST['password']. Then use the same algorithm to hash it (in your case password_hash($password, PASSWORD_DEFAULT);) then compare it with the passwords on your DB. Aug 21 '15 at 21:29
  • 4
    why sanitize the pw? it's going to be hashed anyways.
    – Marc B
    Aug 21 '15 at 21:31
  • 1
    Are you allowing enough characters to be stored in your DB table? If you have something like VARCHAR(50), it is cutting off the hashed password. Encryption is typically 128 or 256.
    – ja408
    Aug 21 '15 at 21:44
  • 1
    Check this out...may be very useful to you github.com/panique/php-login-minimal
    – VIDesignz
    Aug 21 '15 at 21:49
6

I am note sure where exactly the problem is. You stated that you already store the hashed password (with password_hash()) in your database. So the basic workflow would be:

a) Save the hash of the password given at the registration in your database (not the cleartext password):

$hash = password_hash($_POST['password'], PASSWORD_DEFAULT);    
$sql = "INSERT INTO users (id, full_name, email, password, username, sign_up_date, activated) VALUES ('', '$full_name', '$email', '$hash', '$username', '$date', '1')";

b) If a user tries to login you simply get the hash from the database WHERE email = '{$_POST['email']} and then use the password_verify function:

if (!password_verify($_POST['login_password'], $hash_from_database)) { exit; }

Does this help?

4
  • this doesn't work, I get my "Invalid password" echo as a result of (!password_verify()....)
    – t_soist
    Aug 22 '15 at 1:24
  • What's the benefit of doing the verification in the script versus sending the hash and the name in the query? Does password_verify run additional checks? I'd like to know. Thanks. Sep 28 '18 at 1:17
  • @TheRealChx101 On the top of my head i can think of on reason: password_verify or the used default hash and the comparision might change in the future and thus and it is safer and more future proof to use the provided function
    – puelo
    Sep 28 '18 at 10:31
  • @puelo Thanks. I also found out that password_hash creates a hash with a different salt each time. So passing that directly into the database will always return an empty result set. So, password_verify does what it says it does. Sep 28 '18 at 19:12
2

I am pretty confused with your question, but I believe you want to convert the signed up user's password to hash and then verify it? Why you want to verify the password anyways?

But you can achieve it this way if I have got you right:

$hash = password_hash($password, PASSWORD_DEFAULT);

if (!password_verify($password, $hash)) {
    echo 'Invalid password.';
    exit;
}

the password will be the one that you have got from the user, you convert it to hash and then verify it, but it still doesn't make sense to me, why you want to do that?

2
  • 1
    Im doing this to verify an entered password in a login form to a stored hash, to see if the user enters their correct password. But this worked, thanks.
    – t_soist
    Aug 22 '15 at 1:54
  • Yeah this works, because as far as i see it you compare the hash of the password entered at login against the SAME password. You could basically enter anything and it still would work. You need to take the hash from the database.
    – puelo
    Aug 22 '15 at 11:46

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