74

I find myself doing a ton of jQuery these days, so I started to abstract out some of the common things I do into snippets. I look forward to sharing these with the community, but I'm running into an issue right now.

The literals in snippets are defined by adding dollar signs ($) around the name of the literal to delimit where the value you would like to provide will go. This is difficult because jQuery uses the dollar sign notation in order to use a lot of its functionality.

What is the escape sequence for snippets, so I am able to use the dollar sign, and have my snippets still function?

3
  • 1
    More of a side note, but don't forget you can use jQuery instead of $ – Dan Heberden Jul 9 '10 at 19:09
  • Note: This question is about Visual Studio, not Visual Studio Code; however, this particular answer is about the latter. – mklement0 Feb 23 '20 at 18:47
  • use $$item instead of $item – raskul Oct 1 '20 at 3:26
141

To have a literal $ try doubling it: $$

10
  • 10
    This approach still keep the cursor jumping to this position when tab is used. With this answer I could escape correctly. – robsonrosa Apr 27 '17 at 20:44
  • 1
    Worked for me also! VS2015 – Craig Mayers Jun 8 '17 at 9:17
  • 3
    Works in VS2017, C# – SvdSinner Jan 24 '18 at 15:42
  • 3
    Works for me in C#, VS2017. – Setyo N Dec 17 '18 at 1:59
  • 3
    Works in VS2019, C# – Damian Vogel Jul 26 '19 at 18:16
74

This is the right way for Visual Studio Code: \\$.

This makes the $ a literal part of the snippet rather than the start of a $-prefixed construct.

3
  • 1
    This doesn't mess up the tabbing in VSC. IE if you use the $$ approach VSC assumes that you want to do something in those positions. – Elias Ranz Sep 4 '18 at 14:07
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer. The currently accepted answer messes up when tabbing between $variables. – hunt Oct 1 '18 at 15:02
  • 5
    @hunt: This is the right answer for Visual Studio Code, whereas the question and the accepted answer are about Visual Studio. – mklement0 Feb 23 '20 at 19:54
24

There is an "Delimiter" attribute defined for a Code element. This defaults to $ but you can set it to a different character like ~ or so.

...

<Snippet>
<Code Language="JavaScript" Delimiter="~"><![CDATA[(function ($) {
    $(document).ready(function () {

    });
})(jQuery);]]></Code>
</Snippet>

...

1
  • 1
    Not sure why this is not the accepted answer. Delimiter is attribute that specifies the delimiter used to describe literals and objects in the code and its exact purpose is to replace the $ if needed.<Code Language="csharp" Delimiter="!"><![CDATA[Log.Debug(message: $"!end!");]]></Code> – mdisibio May 18 '20 at 17:19
8

Although the jQuery response is valid, it's a nicer syntax to use the $ notation.

I've found an answer: Making the $ character a literal with a default value of $.

<Literal Editable="true">

<ID>dollar</ID> <ToolTip>replace the dollar sign character</ToolTip> <Default>$</Default> <Function> </Function> </Literal>
2
  • 1
    I found that this works in C# for using the "$" for a Formattable string type. – Joseph Morgan Jun 1 '16 at 18:25
  • I wasn't sure if adding an example was a comment or an answer, so because of length I added it below. It is based on this answer. – Joseph Morgan Jun 1 '16 at 18:38
3

I used this for a formattable string in C#. I used the example above from cory-fowler verbatim:

<Literal Editable="true">
    <ID>dollar</ID>
    <ToolTip>Replace the dollar sign character</ToolTip>
    <Default>$</Default>
    <Function></Function>
</Literal>

Usage (line breaks are added for clarity on Stack Overflow, not in the original.):

    string errMessage = $dollar$"Error occurred in
       {MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Module}, in procedure
       {MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name}: {ex.Message}".ToString();

Thanks, cory-fowler!

0

I found the above cory-fowler answer useful, but was frustrated that the literal $ was pre-selected when executing a C# snippet in VS 2019...

Snippet with Literal Editable=true

It was also ignoring my $end$ keyword...

<![CDATA[string Literal_edit_true = $dollar$"$end$";]]>

Simply changing to Editable=false resolved the issue and now the cursor appears at $end$ ready to type...

Snippet with Literal Editable=false

<Snippet>
    <Code Language="CSharp">
        <![CDATA[string Literal_edit_false = $dollar$"$end$";]]>
    </Code>
    <Declarations>
        <Literal Editable="false">
            <ID>dollar</ID>
            <ToolTip>Replace the dollar sign character</ToolTip>
            <Default>$</Default>
            <Function></Function>
        </Literal>
    </Declarations>
</Snippet>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.