15

A number of different how-tos on Elixir programming express the view that storing state or running an infinite loop is done idiomatically either by spinning the data off into an Agent or Task, or by infinite recursion of the function that needs state. They don't mention any limits on how deep the recursion can go or any other caveats.

Since searching for "Elixir stack overflow" just results in hits to this website, let me remove the ambiguity and ask here: What implementation guarantees are there in Elixir to make sure that infinite recursion as a method of 'looping' won't result in a stack overflow, especially when state information is being carried around along the way?

  • 8
    From the second how-to you've linked to: "In Elixir/Erlang, such recursion will not cause a stack overflow, since both languages have special handling of the so called "tail calls" which will, on a byte code level, be transformed to a jump/goto instructions. Consequently, this code simply runs an endless loop." – Hristo Iliev Aug 23 '15 at 7:50
  • 1
    Thanks. I'll clarify my wording to keep this question useful. – bright-star Aug 23 '15 at 7:52
  • 5
    Note that this is not true for recursion in general, but only for the case of tail recursion. Tail recursion means that no code from at the current level is executed after the recursive call (i.e. the recursion occurs at the tail of the function), therefore there is no need to retain the stack space of the current level and it can be safely reused for the nested call. There is also no need to make a function call - a jump to the beginning of the function body will suffice. That is also how tail recursion is optimised in F# and possibly in other languages. – Hristo Iliev Aug 23 '15 at 8:07
  • 2
    For guarantees, see here (section Tail call optimization) and here (section Length of a Tail Recursion). – Hristo Iliev Aug 23 '15 at 8:11
  • 1
    Yes all of that stuff that Hristo says is true but you need to insure (as Sasa points out below) that you don't inadvertently create your code in such a way as to prevent Erlang from applying the TCO. – Onorio Catenacci Aug 24 '15 at 13:56
16

To summarize excellent comments by Hristo, the general mechanism is called "Tail Call Optimization" (TCO) and it ensures that if the last thing a function does is invocation of another function (or itself), then there won't be stack push. Instead, a simple jump will occur.

There are some subtle nuances as to what is a tail call. Let's see a few example. The simplest one is:

def foo do
  # ...

  bar(...)  # tail call -> nothing is pushed to the stack
end

TCO will also apply for conditional expressions:

def foo do
  # ...

  if (...) do
    # ...
    bar(...)            # tail call
  else
    # ...
    baz(...)            # tail call
  end
end

This works because again the last thing a function does is an invocation of a function. The result of if is the result of either bar or baz so there's no need to push anything onto stack.

In contrast, if the caller function does something after calling another function, it's not a tail call, and TCO won't happen:

def foo do
  # ...

  # Not a tail call since we're doing something after bar returns
  # (increment the result by 1)
  1 + bar(...)    
end

Another example of breaking TCO is calling the function in try:

def foo do
  try do
    bar(...)    # not a tail call
  rescue
    # ...
  end
end

It's also worth mentioning that due to TCO you won't see some functions in the stack trace when an exception occurs:

def foo do
  # ...
  bar(...)  # at this point foo "disappears" from stack trace
end

def bar(...) do
  # ...
  raise("error")
end

The stack dump of this error won't include foo since it is not on the stack anymore (it is effectively replaced with bar).

  • This is a great explanation of TCO. Do you have any specific references that explain Elixir's implementation? – bright-star Aug 24 '15 at 9:08
  • 4
    This work is done by Erlang compiler. You could compile Elixir to Erlang assembly to see that TCO is applied (gist.github.com/sasa1977/73274c2be733b5321ace). I'm not aware of any reference other than the source code of Erlang's compiler :-) – sasajuric Aug 24 '15 at 10:31
  • Hey @sasajuric am I missing something here? "def foo do" and then "bar()"? Shouldn't the last statement be "foo()"? – Onorio Catenacci Aug 24 '15 at 13:57
  • 1
    @OnorioCatenacci I deliberately specify call to another function to indicate that TCO doesn't apply only for recursion, but to any function call. – sasajuric Aug 24 '15 at 14:56
  • 2
    Yeah, TCO is mostly relevant for recursion. However, it's worth knowing that it is more general, b/c that means you can also run infinite indirect recursions, e.g. if foo calls bar, bar calls baz, and baz calls foo. Due to TCO that will work as well. – sasajuric Aug 24 '15 at 15:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.