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Im trying to implement 3 additional threads to my main application that do non shared operations.

At first i thought its working, because if i uncomment the last printf call in the WorkerThread function, its not locking at WaitThread() after a random period of time. Without printf, it sometimes takes a few seconds till it locks at the mWaitCond.Wait() function, sometimes right after the start. printf seems to fix the timing of the threads.

The application doesnt crash, simply cpu usage of the application goes to 0% (and of each thread) and its not-responsive. Halting in the visual studio debugger shows the line while(mWakeUp) mWaitCondition.Wait() in the WaitThread() function as the current position. It also shows that mWakeUp is false for all threads, so it shouldnt stay in that while loop.

My idea behind the design:

  1. SetupThreads() is called before going into the main endless loop
  2. Inside the endless loop, WorkerInit() is called to wakup threads
  3. Before i access the data of the 3 threads, WorkerWait() is called to wait till they finished
  4. Inside the WorkerThread function(called by each thread), im locking the mutex and wait till the thread is woken up or stopped
  5. After processing the data, wakeUp is set to false and the condition_variable notifys

Could it be that waitthread waits for thread one after another and as it waits for lets says thread at index 0, thread at index 2 continues to run?

    static const ui32 NumContexts = 3;

    // array of pointers to threads
    std::thread* mThreadHandles[NumContexts];

    // wakup
    std::atomic<bool> mWakeUp[NumContexts];
    std::mutex mWakeMutex[NumContexts];
    std::condition_variable mWakeCondition[NumContexts];

    // wait for thread to finish task
    std::mutex mWaitMutex[NumContexts];
    std::condition_variable mWaitCondition[NumContexts];

    // stop signal
    std::atomic<bool> mStop[NumContexts];

    void Framework::SetupThreading()
    {
        // create and start threads
        for (int i = 0; i < NumContexts; i++)
        {
            this->mWakeUp[i] = false;
            this->mStop[i] = false;
            this->mThreadHandles[i] = new  std::thread(&Framework::WorkerThread, this, reinterpret_cast<void*>(i));
        }
    }

    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::WakeUpThread(int i)
    {
        {
            //auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(this->mWakeMutex[i]);
            std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(this->mWakeMutex[i]);
            //printf("Waking up thread %i \n", i);

            this->mWakeUp[i] = true;
        }
        this->mWakeCondition[i].notify_one();
    }

    // THIS FUNCTION LOCKS
    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::WaitThread(int i)
    {
        auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(this->mWaitMutex[i]);
        //printf("Waiting for thread %i to finish \n", i);

        while (this->mWakeUp[i])
            this->mWaitCondition[i].wait(lock);

        //printf("Thread %i finished! \n", i);
    }

    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::StopThread(int i)
    {
        auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(this->mWakeMutex[i]);
        printf("Sending stop signal for thread %i \n", i);
        this->mStop[i] = true;
        this->mWakeCondition[i].notify_one();
    }

    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::JoinThread(int i)
    {
        printf("Waiting for join of thread %i \n", i);
        this->mThreadHandles[i]->join();
        printf("Thread %i joined! \n", i);
    }

    // THESE ARE CALLED IN THE MAIN LOOP
    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::WorkerInit()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < NumContexts; i++)
        {
            this->WakeUpThread(i);
        }
    }

    void Framework::WorkerWait()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < NumContexts; i++)
        {
            this->WaitThread(i);
        }
    }

    // THE FUNCTION CALLED BY THE THREADS
    //---------------------------------------------
    void Framework::WorkerThread(LPVOID workerIndex)
    {
        int threadIndex = reinterpret_cast<int>(workerIndex);
        while (threadIndex < NumContexts && threadIndex >= 0)
        {
            {
                auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(this->mWakeMutex[threadIndex]);
                //printf("thread %i: waiting for wakeup or stop signal...\n", threadIndex);

                // not stopped nor woken up? continue to wait
                while (this->mWakeUp[threadIndex] == false && this->mStop[threadIndex] == false)
                {
                    this->mWakeCondition[threadIndex].wait(lock);
                }

                // stop signal sent?
                if (this->mStop[threadIndex])
                {
                    //printf("thread %i: got stop signal!\n", threadIndex);
                    return;
                }
                //printf("thread %i: got wakeup signal!\n", threadIndex);

                // lock unlocks here (lock destructor)
            }

            //  printf("thread %i: running the task...\n", threadIndex);

             // RUN CODE HERE

                //printf("thread %i finished! Sending signal!...\n", threadIndex);

                // m_wakeup is atomic so there is no concurrency issue with wait()
                this->mWakeUp[threadIndex] = false;
                this->mWaitCondition[threadIndex].notify_all();


        }
    }
  • This is probably not the solution for your potential deadlock issue, but it seems, your code has a couple of classic data races. You might use the mutex to avoid those. To figure out where these are: ask every variable if it can be accessed from more than one thread, where at least one thread modifies the variable. If there is no synchronization primitive, like a mutex, that's a data race. Consider also, that there is likely a much simpler approach for your problem. – CouchDeveloper Aug 23 '15 at 11:42
  • Im using D3D12s CommandLists to record commands. Each thread has it own data array and commandlist, so no shared access to any data. It also works fine if i use printf to display the states of my threads: codepaste.net/wmqgao It also locks if i dont process anything with the threads – Raphael Mayer Aug 23 '15 at 11:45
  • 1
    For example this->mWakeUp[i] = false; you modify the state without a synchronization primitive. Note that atomicity alone is not the sort of concurrency you need here. Though, the issue won't become perceivable on a strongly ordered CPU. It's still a data race. – CouchDeveloper Aug 23 '15 at 11:58
  • 1
    @CouchDeveloper No, an access to an atomic variable cannot - by definition - participate in a data race. Yes, there is a race between the store this->mWakeUp[threadIndex] = false; and notification this->mWaitCondition[threadIndex].notify_all(); in WorkerThread, but it's not a data race. – Casey Aug 24 '15 at 1:28
  • 1
    @Casey You are right, std::atomic guarantees that access is free of race conditions. But this is only guaranteed for this variable, without context (well, we don't know the underlying memory barriers). If you need a "synchronised with" and "happens before" relationship involving more than one variable, you should use synchronisation primitives like a mutex. – CouchDeveloper Aug 24 '15 at 6:56
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If the CPU usage for the thread is zero, then it is not spinning in the while loop, but rather blocked on the wait(). Until the wait() un-blocks the loop condition will not be tested.

Check the call stack in the debugger to verify, the halted position may just be indicating the return location in your source code rather then he current location.

Also check the status of WorkerThread instances - are they running and calling notify_all()? Is your debugger thread aware?

I am not sure I understand your design or intent, but it seems somewhat over complex to me on the face of it and ripe for a deadlock situation.

  • printing after the notify_all() function call tells me that all 3 indexes reached that point before hangup.after that, the debugger position is at wait() call inside the WorkerThread function. a screenshot with threads position. stuck at wait: i.imgur.com/dYcXZAL.png – Raphael Mayer Aug 23 '15 at 9:58
  • About the design: I try to run 3 threads which do work every frame, and i need to wait that all 3 threads have finished before i can continue work on the main thread. – Raphael Mayer Aug 23 '15 at 10:06
  • @anthom Utilizing futures and promises would make this an easy problem to solve. Unfortunately, std::future has a couple of drawbacks in the current std. Perhaps using boost's future implementation is a much better option. theboostcpplibraries.com/boost.thread-futures-and-promises, boost.org/doc/libs/1_58_0/doc/html/thread/… – CouchDeveloper Aug 23 '15 at 11:46
  • @anthom : The screenshot should be added to the question directly rather than an off-site link in a comment. You could use the debugger more effectively; why insert a print when you could use a breakpoint to check arrival at a location? Your screenshot only shows the Autos tab; in this instance the call-stack and threads tabs are probably more relevant. – Clifford Aug 25 '15 at 6:54

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