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A software development enthusiast noted the following:

Current status: compulsively rewriting all my JS after making the intuitive connection between generator functions and monad comprehensions.

I felt like I missed something there. My solution to callback hell was to use something like js-csp (ie a queue).

My question is: What is the connection between generator functions and monads in JavaScript?

  • Well, the author must have missed something as well. Generator functions are no monad comprehensions. – Bergi Aug 24 '15 at 21:15
  • What is your take on the subsequent comments on the original tweet? – hawkeye Aug 25 '15 at 8:02
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    @mrmcgreg: Except that the author doesn't use generators at all in that article. He seems to confuse them with iterators. – Bergi Aug 25 '15 at 10:52
  • How about where the author says "Build monadic parser combinators with generator functions? Sure, no problem." and then links to: github.com/bodil/graham/blob/master/parse.js#L10 – hawkeye Aug 25 '15 at 11:10
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There is none.

While generator functions may look very similar to monad comprehensions (i.e. do notation), they are not as generic. The main problem is that ES6 generators are stateful, and can only be advanced once per continuation. Try implementing the list monad with them and see it fail.

True monad comprehensions can be achieved using a compile-to-JS language that supports them (like LatteJs, monadic, PureScript or LispyScript), or sweet.js macros. They typically desugar to callbacks - just like in Haskell.

  • What is your take on the subsequent comments on the original tweet? – hawkeye Aug 25 '15 at 2:27
  • @hawkeye: Which ones are you targeting specifically? – Bergi Aug 25 '15 at 10:54
  • The one where the original author says "Build monadic parser combinators with generator functions? Sure, no problem." and then links to: github.com/bodil/graham/blob/master/parse.js#L10 – hawkeye Aug 25 '15 at 11:10
  • No idea what he means here, and I can't find an example where run is actually used. It looks like run creates a parser from a generator that specifies a sequence of parsers, but it fails to do backtracking. His Parser<A> type (which is a function) is monadic indeed though, with ret and seq. – Bergi Aug 25 '15 at 11:28
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No, the perceived intuitive nature is tenuous.

Successive yield statements look like nested continuations as in some kind of a sequential concurrency monad, but each subsequent 'effect' in any monad does not require repeated/indeterminate application.

You could implement an instance of monad with generators, but I think that's as far as the relationship goes (ie not necessarily intuitive); monads seem far more general.

The term monad comprehension seems to refer to implementing list comprehensions as a monad. See Comprehending Monads, (introduction and section 2.2). However,commonly in JS development, 'monad comprehension', seems to be used interchangeably with 'monad'.

And I've never heard of the term 'resumption' and can not find a definition/basis for it.

I don't have access to twitter right now, but maybe your friend is trying to create a lazy lodash/underscore/list-homomorphism library?

  • What is your take on the subsequent comments on the original tweet? – hawkeye Aug 25 '15 at 2:26
  • Even if this might be a little picky two clarifications: Since generators are merely iterator factories, iterables are the dual of observables. Besides generators doesn't maintain continuations but resumptions, since the former ought to always be in tail position. – ftor Aug 31 '16 at 9:34
  • This answer is wrong - Here's a library implementing Do-Notation/Monad Comprehension using generator functions: github.com/pelotom/burrido ~ Also: While monads and comprehension might not be equivalent concepts, they are strongly related; for example both the map and flatMap part of a monad can be recovered using monad comprehension. – Garlef Wegart Nov 4 '16 at 9:40
  • Also, Burrido mimics monadic style with continuations in the virtual machine instead of closed lambdas (a la de-sugared do-notation). Given the OP's question, I thought it prudent to say that burrido forces one to adopt VM conventions rather than rely on general combinators (bind/return) which are constructed using functions/composition, and which don't always require an application '()' at each 'step'. In fact, burrido confuses the user implemented 'bind' with the implicit bind it provides through its own continuations! – theoski Nov 8 '16 at 14:57

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