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This question already has an answer here:

For example I've array generated with the loop like this.

var array=[];
for(var i=1; i<=30; i++)
  {
   array.push(i);

  }
 console.log(array);

I want to output the combination of all the possible group of 7 numbers from the array. For example a sample output may look like : [1,5,14,4,30,23,19]. If I would to calculate the possible combination with the combination formula. It would be something like this: n!/r!(n-r)!

And it is going to be a huge number. I've found a permutation solution here, but what it does is that it prints out all the possible numbers according to the length of array. But my need is to find out the possible combination of 7 numbers from total 30 integers.

How would I solve this problem logically and practically with javascript.

marked as duplicate by rici, bytecode77, RAS, repeat, EdChum Aug 24 '15 at 8:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    There would be 10,260,432,000 possible combinations. I don't think your computer would be able to print that in a reasonable time. – blex Aug 23 '15 at 20:13
  • 1
    @blex I think there should only be just over 2 million combinations (30 choose 7). – Paulpro Aug 23 '15 at 20:14
  • 2
    ya @blex but I am wondering for the possible alternative to this problem, no matter how much time would it takes. – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 20:15
  • 1
    @blex, the order can be random or symmetric but the thing I need is all the possible combinations of numbers in array. – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 20:16
  • 1
    You can be pretty sure that, about this kind of common algorithms, everything is already done – David Aug 23 '15 at 20:30
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guess this is what you're after?

function cartesian_product(xs, ys) {
    var result = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < xs.length; i++) {
        for (var j = 0; j < ys.length; j++) {
            // transform [ [1, 2], 3 ] => [ 1, 2, 3 ] and append it to result []
            result.push([].concat.apply([], [ xs[i], ys[j] ]));
        }
    }
    return result;
}

function cartesian_power(xs, n) {
    var result = xs;
    for(var i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        result = cartesian_product(result, xs)
    }
    return result;
}

// in your case params are [ 1, 2... 30] and 7
console.log(cartesian_power([1, 2, 3, 4], 2));

output is:

[ [ 1, 1 ],
  [ 1, 2 ],
  [ 1, 3 ],
  [ 1, 4 ],
  [ 2, 1 ],
  [ 2, 2 ],
  [ 2, 3 ],
  [ 2, 4 ],
  [ 3, 1 ],
  [ 3, 2 ],
  [ 3, 3 ],
  [ 3, 4 ],
  [ 4, 1 ],
  [ 4, 2 ],
  [ 4, 3 ],
  [ 4, 4 ] ]

UPDATE

this one will require much less memory, since it will not store anything, it will just print the output. but still doubt it's practical.

function print_combs(arr, n, out) {
    if (n === 0) {
        console.log(out);
    } else {
        for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            print_combs(arr, n-1, out+arr[i]);
        }
    }
}

print_combs([1, 2, 3, 4], 2, "");
  • Thanks @rodic, this is actually I'm looking for. But how can i handle the operation if I would to deal with the array of 30 or 40 integers? Are there any way to output without any crash? – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 20:53
  • don't know really, don't think this is something you should do in js. in case of array with length 30 and 7 nums the output array will have 30**7 arrays, that's a lot. – rodic Aug 23 '15 at 21:00
  • ya, the computer can't handle it. – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 21:02
  • check the update – rodic Aug 23 '15 at 21:30
  • thanks! do you know what is the practical approach to solve this problem? – user2906838 Aug 24 '15 at 6:49
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First of all: this will generate bincoef(7,30) sets of integers, which is roughly 2mio. sets, so you should really consider whether you need this amount of data, since this algorithm will generate a mass of data and will require quite a lot of data. I can only offer pseudocode, since my javascript knowledge is rather basic.

void nextPermutation(int[] in, int[] set, int last_from_input, int at_element)
    //we can't generate further permutations from this position, since
    //there is aren't enough elements in the input-array left
    if(last_from_input >= 30 - at_element)
        return

    //the set is filled -> process the produced set
    if(at_element === 7)
        print(set)//process permutation
        return

    //add one element to the set and proceed with further elements
    for(int i in ]last_from_input, length(in) - (7 - at_element)[
        set[at_element] = in[i]

        nextPermutation(in , set , i, at_element + 1)

Basically this algorithm gets the following arguments:

  • in : the 30 integer to select from
  • set: the current part of the petmutation containing all elements we've added so far
  • last_from_input: the index of the last element from in we added to set
  • at_element: the index of the element in the set we're currently searching

This algorithm basically adds one element that has a higher index than the last added element and continue searching recursively searching for the next element. If the set is complete it can be processed. If there are more elements required to complete the set than elements left in in it's impossible to complete the set, we can break off with this part of the search. This is not optimally implemented regarding efficiency but I tried to keep things simple

Now we can simply generate all permutations in this way:

void genPermutations(int[] in)
    nextPermutation(in , new int[7],-1,0)
  • thanks can you please tell me more about your approach. Are all those arguments should be passed in nextPermutation? – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 20:30
  • That's Java, not JavaScript? – Bergi Aug 23 '15 at 20:34
  • @Bergi, it's ok, I need to know the approach but I found same alike solution in javascript too. So thanks! – user2906838 Aug 23 '15 at 20:37
  • @Bergi nope that's pseudocode. As mentioned in the answer – Paul Aug 23 '15 at 20:45

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