16

Make other functions access the $conn variable inside my database connection function

So here I am absolutely desperate trying to make something work. I know what im trying to do is not OOP neither 100% best practice. It is not for a live website, I am just learning some basic PHP concepts on XAMPP.

What I am trying to do is to make the $conn variable inside my database connection function accessible to all other functions that need it. I am thinking of passing it as a parameter, but how can this be done? I prefer not using PHP's "global" or $GLOBALS. My method of working right now is with mysqli using procedural methods.

For example I have something like this:

function db () {
$conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
}

function someFunction () {
$result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)
}

I never found the answer to my issue...most solutions which I recently got familiar with are OOP based or use somewhat questionable methods.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SOLUTION A - I would rather avoid not having my connection in a wrapper and using global variables:

global $conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
global $conn;

function someFunction () {
global $conn;
$result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)
}

SOLUTION B - I am not ready for OOP yet but I know this works. The point is I want to learn something different:

class Database
{
    private static $conn;

    public static function getObject()
    {
        if (!self::$conn)
            self::$conn = new mysqli("localhost", "root", "", "database");

        return self::$conn;
    }
}

function someFunction () {
$result = mysqli_query (Database::$conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)
}

SOLUTION C - Not using functions at all...just keeping it unwrapped which I dont find very practical in the long term:

$conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");

$result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE SOLUTION I AM TRYING TO ACHIEVE:

function db () {
$conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
return $conn;
}

function someFunction () {
$conn = db ();
$result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)
}

OR Something like this where I just pass in the connection as a parameter or something (pseudo code at the moment)

function db () {
$conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
}

function someFunction ($conn) {
$result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples)
}

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So how do I achieve something like the last two but which actually works. Is this concept possible?

2
  • 1
    OOP isn't really about picking the most obtuse approach. Use the one that's the least effort and API complexity for your actual use case. Overplanning for issues you don't actually have or just for some best practice meme isn't that advisable.
    – mario
    Aug 24, 2015 at 18:24
  • 1
    you are already showing a solution here "THE SOLUTION I AM TRYING TO ACHIEVE:" ; why will this not work for you?
    – CodeGodie
    Aug 24, 2015 at 18:29

5 Answers 5

25

Your Desired Solution: This should work, and you'll only make one connection.

function db () {
    static $conn;
    if ($conn===NULL){ 
        $conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
    }
    return $conn;
}

function someFunction () {
    $conn = db();
    $result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples);
}

If you used the function someFunction($conn), that would make your code much messier, since you wouldn't actually have universal access to $conn from anywhere.

You should go with Solution B IMO. That way, you can have simple access to it Database::$conn which will be consistent throughout your script. You could should have an initialize function (you could use a different name if you want) that will initialize Database::$conn, and you can then use that to initialize other things on the Database class later, if desired.

Solution A is terrible. I did that for a long time (globalizing things), and it was a horrible idea. I should have never done that. But I did. And I learned. It just made code get progressively sloppier and sloppier.

Solution B: Database::$conn should be public if you want to be able to access it by Database::$conn from anywhere. If it's private, then you would always need to call Database::getObject();

Solution C: You're right. That would be very impractical.

Solution B rewrite:

class Database
{
    /** TRUE if static variables have been initialized. FALSE otherwise
    */
    private static $init = FALSE;
    /** The mysqli connection object
    */
    public static $conn;
    /** initializes the static class variables. Only runs initialization once.
    * does not return anything.
    */
    public static function initialize()
    {
        if (self::$init===TRUE)return;
        self::$init = TRUE;
        self::$conn = new mysqli("localhost", "root", "", "database");
    }
}

Then... call Database::initialize() at least once before it gets used.

<?php
Database::initialize();
$result = mysqli_query (Database::$conn, "SELECT * FROM examples);
?>

EDIT

  • You can also call Database::initialize() immediately after the declaration of the class, in that PHP file. Then initializing is handled.
  • I'm now far more fond of something like Database::getDb() than accessing the $conn property directly. Then initialize can be called from the getDb() function. Basically like the Desired Solution but inside a class. The class really isn't necessary, but it can be nice if you like classes, like I do.
7
  • $Jakar by the way, what does the static conn do?
    – Asperger
    Aug 24, 2015 at 21:18
  • so that the value doesnt get lost outside?
    – Asperger
    Aug 24, 2015 at 21:19
  • When I declare static $conn, it makes it so there is only one instance of $conn that exists within that function... So $conn will refer to the static one (which persists through multiple function calls) rather than a local (local to the function) variable. Without static $conn, then every time you call db(), $conn would be undefined/NULL until you assigned it.
    – Reed
    Aug 25, 2015 at 15:27
  • Also, if you use Solution B, then you can also use an autoloader to automatically call initialize. I have an example on my site at forum.jakar.co/php-static-class-initializer-using-autoloading/…
    – Reed
    Aug 25, 2015 at 16:22
  • 1
    interesting. Im using the desired solution one but will 100% use the OOP singleton (I think thats what you call it) which you showed me when im going over to OOP
    – Asperger
    Aug 26, 2015 at 8:16
2

All of the answers in this section are overkill as they are doing overhead just by creating a wrapper around a database object. For separation of concern(Maintainability) use a separate PHP file for database connection and use require_once.

//Inside Database_Connect.php

$db = mysqi_connect(localhost, database, password);

Now use $GLOBALS['db'] inside your mysqli_ functions wherever needed.

OR, initialize your script / object as

$dbConn = $GLOBALS['db'];

and use $dbConn inside your mysqli_ functions wherever needed.

0

simple answer just pass your $conn variable into another calling function(instead of making new connection)

like

yourpage.php

$conn = new mysqli($servername, $username, $password, $dbname);
someFunction ($conn)//you can add other parameters if you like 

function someFunction ($conn) {
    $result = mysqli_query ($conn, "SELECT * FROM examples);
}

Note:This is not good practice to always make new connection for database access.so always make connection once and use it every where.(but if your requirement different and require multiples connections then you can make multiples connections)

-1

Pass an argument to your function like and return the connection

function db($conn){
   $conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
   return $conn;
}
3
  • .. and return it from the db function: return mysqli_connect(...) Aug 24, 2015 at 18:19
  • 9
    Why are you passing $conn and then setting $conn? I think you're on the right track but the example function, as written, is useless
    – Machavity
    Aug 24, 2015 at 18:23
  • how does this answer the OP's question?
    – CodeGodie
    Aug 24, 2015 at 18:23
-1

If you have multiple php files which require db access, then the option you can have is create a file connection.php with connection code

<?php
$conn = mysqli_connect ("localhost", "root", "", "database");
?>

And use include_once 'connection.php'; in all other files you require a connection.

1
  • That's not what OP asked.
    – TheCarver
    Feb 8, 2018 at 12:41

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