547

How do I rename a file using C#?

  • I'd hate to add that there is a problem here all the solutions here especially if you do compares and are moving the file from one location to another (directory as well as filename) insofar as you should be aware that a volume could be a junction point... so if newname is q:\SomeJunctionDirectory\hello.txt and the old name is c:\TargetOfJunctionPoint\hello.txt... the files are the same but the names aren't. – Adrian Hum Oct 14 '16 at 1:26
  • If need to delete then use File.Delete(path); – Anish May 16 '18 at 13:32

15 Answers 15

842

Take a look at System.IO.File.Move, "move" the file to a new name.

System.IO.File.Move("oldfilename", "newfilename");
  • 10
    This solution does not work when file names differ only in letter case. For example file.txt and File.txt – SepehrM Jul 6 '14 at 20:31
  • 2
    @SepehrM, I just double checked and it works fine on my Windows 8.1 machine. – Chris Taylor Jul 7 '14 at 1:57
  • I'm not sure why this happens but take a look at these posts: stackoverflow.com/questions/8152731/… and codeproject.com/Tips/365773/… – SepehrM Jul 7 '14 at 6:43
  • 1
    @SepehrM, I did not test it, but the samples you point to use FileInfo.Move and not File.Move so maybe that has something to do with it? – Chris Taylor Jul 7 '14 at 12:31
  • 2
    @Michael, the file system is case insensitive, but it does store the filename in the original case as entered by the user. In SepehrM's case, he was trying to change the case of a file, which for some reason was not working. The case insensitive matching was working. HTH – Chris Taylor Oct 18 '16 at 0:08
120
System.IO.File.Move(oldNameFullPath, newNameFullPath);
39

You can use File.Move to do it.

38

In the File.Move method, this won't overwrite the file if it is already exists. And it will throw an exception.

So we need to check whether the file exists or not.

/* Delete the file if exists, else no exception thrown. */

File.Delete(newFileName); // Delete the existing file if exists
File.Move(oldFileName,newFileName); // Rename the oldFileName into newFileName

Or surround it with a try catch to avoid an exception.

  • 15
    be really careful with this approach... if your destination directory and your source directory are the same, and the "newname" actually a case-sensitive version of "oldFileName", you will delete before you get a chance to move your file. – Adrian Hum Oct 14 '16 at 1:16
  • 1
    You also cannot just check the strings for equality as there are several ways of representing a single file path. – Drew Noakes Dec 13 '17 at 22:03
27

Just add:

namespace System.IO
{
    public static class ExtendedMethod
    {
        public static void Rename(this FileInfo fileInfo, string newName)
        {
            fileInfo.MoveTo(fileInfo.Directory.FullName + "\\" + newName);
        }
    }
}

And then...

FileInfo file = new FileInfo("c:\test.txt");
file.Rename("test2.txt");
  • 1
    That won't work if a subfolder already exists called newName – Tim Dams Dec 15 '14 at 20:34
  • ... "\\" + newName + fileInfo.Extension – mac10688 Feb 15 '16 at 18:22
  • 17
    eww... Use Path.Combine() instead of assembling the file. – Adrian Hum Oct 14 '16 at 1:19
20
  1. First solution

    Avoid System.IO.File.Move solutions posted here (marked answer included). It fails over networks. However, copy/delete pattern works locally and over networks. Follow one of the move solutions, but replace it with Copy instead. Then use File.Delete to delete the original file.

    You can create a Rename method to simplify it.

  2. Ease of use

    Use the VB assembly in C#. Add reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic

    Then to rename the file:

    Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile(myfile, newName);

    Both are strings. Note that myfile has the full path. newName does not. For example:

    a = "C:\whatever\a.txt";
    b = "b.txt";
    Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile(a, b);
    

    The C:\whatever\ folder will now contain b.txt.

  • 8
    just so you know, Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile calls File.Move. Other thank normalizing the original file and doing some additional error checks on the arguments ie. file exists, file name not null etc. it then calls File.Move. – Chris Taylor Jul 7 '14 at 2:07
  • Unless Copy() copies all file streams, which I assume it doesn't, I would stay away from using delete/copy. I assume Move(), at least when staying on the same file system, is simply a rename and thus all file streams will be maintained. – nickdu Dec 1 '16 at 0:54
14

You can copy it as a new file and then delete the old one using the System.IO.File class:

if (File.Exists(oldName))
{
    File.Copy(oldName, newName, true);
    File.Delete(oldName);
}
  • 4
    Note to anyone reading this: This is an anti-pattern, the file might be deleted or renamed by another process or the OS between the check for if it exists and your call to Copy. You need to instead use a try catch. – user9993 Apr 20 '16 at 15:31
  • If the volume is the same, this is also a huge waste of I/O since a move would actually do a rename at directory information level. – Adrian Hum Oct 14 '16 at 1:20
6

NOTE: In this example code we open a directory and search for PDF files with open and closed parenthesis in the name of the file. You can check and replace any character in the name you like or just specify a whole new name using replace functions.

There are other ways to work from this code to do more elaborate renames but my main intention was to show how to use File.Move to do a batch rename. This worked against 335 PDF files in 180 directories when I ran it on my laptop. This is spur of the moment code and there are more elaborate ways to do it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace BatchRenamer
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var dirnames = Directory.GetDirectories(@"C:\the full directory path of files to rename goes here");

            int i = 0;

            try
            {
                foreach (var dir in dirnames)
                {
                    var fnames = Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.pdf").Select(Path.GetFileName);

                    DirectoryInfo d = new DirectoryInfo(dir);
                    FileInfo[] finfo = d.GetFiles("*.pdf");

                    foreach (var f in fnames)
                    {
                        i++;
                        Console.WriteLine("The number of the file being renamed is: {0}", i);

                        if (!File.Exists(Path.Combine(dir, f.ToString().Replace("(", "").Replace(")", ""))))
                        {
                            File.Move(Path.Combine(dir, f), Path.Combine(dir, f.ToString().Replace("(", "").Replace(")", "")));
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("The file you are attempting to rename already exists! The file path is {0}.", dir);
                            foreach (FileInfo fi in finfo)
                            {
                                Console.WriteLine("The file modify date is: {0} ", File.GetLastWriteTime(dir));
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
  • 3
    That's... completely beside the point, on a question answered exactly to the point 3 years ago. – Nyerguds Nov 19 '13 at 11:33
  • 2
    It's a valid example. Overkill maybe but not beside the point. +1 – Adam Nov 27 '13 at 9:11
  • 1
    @Adam: it's a very specific implementation of exactly the answer that was already given three years before, on a question that wasn't about any specific implementation in the first place. Don't see how that's in any way constructive. – Nyerguds Dec 5 '13 at 10:52
  • @Nyerguds then we have different definitions of 'beside the point', which is not surprising since it's a subjective term. – Adam Dec 6 '13 at 11:20
  • @Nyerguds if it's irrelevant for you then that is fine. Some people like verbosity because it helps them to find "real world" implementations of "sample/example" code. It renames file(s). How it is beside the point is pretty much as Adam said, it's subjective. For some reason you feel it to be absolutely objective. Oh well, to each his own. Thanks for the input, either way. – MicRoc Feb 12 '14 at 5:27
5

Use:

using System.IO;

string oldFilePath = @"C:\OldFile.txt"; // Full path of old file
string newFilePath = @"C:\NewFile.txt"; // Full path of new file

if (File.Exists(newFilePath))
{
    File.Delete(newFilePath);
}
File.Move(oldFilePath, newFilePath);
  • 3
    If you're going to do this, I'd suggest checking that the 'oldFilePath' exists before doing anything... or else you'll delete the 'newFilePath' for no reason. – John Kroetch Jul 9 '14 at 19:18
  • Does that even compile (Using System.IO;)? – Peter Mortensen Jun 12 '16 at 14:51
4

Hopefully! it will be helpful for you. :)

  public static class FileInfoExtensions
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// behavior when new filename is exist.
        /// </summary>
        public enum FileExistBehavior
        {
            /// <summary>
            /// None: throw IOException "The destination file already exists."
            /// </summary>
            None = 0,
            /// <summary>
            /// Replace: replace the file in the destination.
            /// </summary>
            Replace = 1,
            /// <summary>
            /// Skip: skip this file.
            /// </summary>
            Skip = 2,
            /// <summary>
            /// Rename: rename the file. (like a window behavior)
            /// </summary>
            Rename = 3
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// Rename the file.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="fileInfo">the target file.</param>
        /// <param name="newFileName">new filename with extension.</param>
        /// <param name="fileExistBehavior">behavior when new filename is exist.</param>
        public static void Rename(this System.IO.FileInfo fileInfo, string newFileName, FileExistBehavior fileExistBehavior = FileExistBehavior.None)
        {
            string newFileNameWithoutExtension = System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(newFileName);
            string newFileNameExtension = System.IO.Path.GetExtension(newFileName);
            string newFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(fileInfo.Directory.FullName, newFileName);

            if (System.IO.File.Exists(newFilePath))
            {
                switch (fileExistBehavior)
                {
                    case FileExistBehavior.None:
                        throw new System.IO.IOException("The destination file already exists.");
                    case FileExistBehavior.Replace:
                        System.IO.File.Delete(newFilePath);
                        break;
                    case FileExistBehavior.Rename:
                        int dupplicate_count = 0;
                        string newFileNameWithDupplicateIndex;
                        string newFilePathWithDupplicateIndex;
                        do
                        {
                            dupplicate_count++;
                            newFileNameWithDupplicateIndex = newFileNameWithoutExtension + " (" + dupplicate_count + ")" + newFileNameExtension;
                            newFilePathWithDupplicateIndex = System.IO.Path.Combine(fileInfo.Directory.FullName, newFileNameWithDupplicateIndex);
                        } while (System.IO.File.Exists(newFilePathWithDupplicateIndex));
                        newFilePath = newFilePathWithDupplicateIndex;
                        break;
                    case FileExistBehavior.Skip:
                        return;
                }
            }
            System.IO.File.Move(fileInfo.FullName, newFilePath);
        }
    }

How to use this code ?

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string targetFile = System.IO.Path.Combine(@"D://test", "New Text Document.txt");
            string newFileName = "Foo.txt";

            // full pattern
            System.IO.FileInfo fileInfo = new System.IO.FileInfo(targetFile);
            fileInfo.Rename(newFileName);

            // or short form
            new System.IO.FileInfo(targetFile).Rename(newFileName);
        }
    }
2

Move is doing the same = Copy and Delete old one.

File.Move(@"C:\ScanPDF\Test.pdf", @"C:\BackupPDF\" + string.Format("backup-{0:yyyy-MM-dd_HH:mm:ss}.pdf",DateTime.Now));
  • 1
    True, if all you care about is the end result. Internally, not so much. – Michael Dec 18 '15 at 23:08
  • No, Move most certainly does not Copy and Delete. – Jim Balter Mar 7 '17 at 9:29
2

In my case, i want the name of the renamed file to be unique, so i add a datetime stamp to the name. This way, the filename of the 'old' log is always unique:

   if (File.Exists(clogfile))
            {
                Int64 fileSizeInBytes = new FileInfo(clogfile).Length;
                if (fileSizeInBytes > 5000000)
                {
                    string path = Path.GetFullPath(clogfile);
                    string filename = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(clogfile);
                    System.IO.File.Move(clogfile, Path.Combine(path, string.Format("{0}{1}.log", filename, DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyyMMdd_HHmmss"))));
                }
            }
1

I couldn't find approach which suits me, so i propose my version. Of course need input, error handling.

public void Rename(string filePath, string newFileName)
{
    var newFilePath = Path.Combine(Path.GetDirectoryName(filePath), newFileName + Path.GetExtension(filePath));
    System.IO.File.Move(filePath, newFilePath);
}
1
  public static class ImageRename
    {
        public static void ApplyChanges(string fileUrl,
                                        string temporaryImageName, 
                                        string permanentImageName)
        {               
                var currentFileName = Path.Combine(fileUrl, 
                                                   temporaryImageName);

                if (!File.Exists(currentFileName))
                    throw new FileNotFoundException();

                var extention = Path.GetExtension(temporaryImageName);
                var newFileName = Path.Combine(fileUrl, 
                                            $"{permanentImageName}
                                              {extention}");

                if (File.Exists(newFileName))
                    File.Delete(newFileName);

                File.Move(currentFileName, newFileName);               
        }
    }
-11

When C# doesn't have some feature, I use C++ or C:

public partial class Program
{
    [DllImport("msvcrt", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, SetLastError = true)]
    public static extern int rename(
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
            string oldpath,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
            string newpath);

    static void FileRename()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Console.Clear();
            Console.Write("Enter a folder name: ");
            string dir = Console.ReadLine().Trim('\\') + "\\";
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(dir))
                break;
            if (!Directory.Exists(dir))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} does not exist", dir);
                continue;
            }
            string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.mp3");

            for (int i = 0; i < files.Length; i++)
            {
                string oldName = Path.GetFileName(files[i]);
                int pos = oldName.IndexOfAny(new char[] { '0', '1', '2' });
                if (pos == 0)
                    continue;

                string newName = oldName.Substring(pos);
                int res = rename(files[i], dir + newName);
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("\n\t\tPress any key to go to main menu\n");
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }
}
  • 20
    C# absolutely has the ability to rename files. – Andrew Barber Oct 26 '12 at 4:53
  • 73
    I am speechless – Chris McGrath May 10 '13 at 19:17
  • Thanks, This is exactly what i wanted. It can change self name on a executable file. – Jake Apr 23 '18 at 1:23

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