8

When I unwrap a value in Swift, I'm always uncertain on how to name the variabile which will contain it:

override func touchesCancelled(touches: Set<UITouch>?, withEvent event: UIEvent?) {

    if let unwrappedTouches = touches
    {
        ....
    }

}

Is there some popular-among-Swift-coders naming convention?

1
  • Please don't do this, we finally got rid of polish notation. And it will be hard to comprehend when lot's of vars begin with unwrapped and the other half with optional. You are planning on balanced naming, right? 😏 Then perhaps we should add polish naming for var and let, perhaps mutable and immutable. So: mutableOptionalX and immutableWrappedY?
    – zaph
    Aug 24, 2015 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

23

You can assign the same name to an unwrapped variable as the optional.

Preferred:

var subview: UIView?
var volume: Double?

// later on...
if let subview = subview, let volume = volume {
  // do something with unwrapped subview and volume
}

Not preferred:

var optionalSubview: UIView?
var volume: Double?

if let unwrappedSubview = optionalSubview {
  if let realVolume = volume {
    // do something with unwrappedSubview and realVolume
  }
}

Taken from The Official raywenderlich.com Swift Style Guide. However these are just guidelines and other conventions may be just fine.

8
  • Absolutely didn't know that you can use the same name!.. was it possibile also in Swift 1?
    – Teejay
    Aug 24, 2015 at 22:50
  • It is possible in Swift 1.2, however I don't know about Swift 1.0.
    – Palle
    Aug 24, 2015 at 23:02
  • Also if var subview = subview
    – zaph
    Aug 24, 2015 at 23:02
  • Yes, one has always been able to use the same name.
    – zaph
    Aug 24, 2015 at 23:02
  • 1
    This creates a new variable which overshadows the existing one. As you cannot create two equally named variables in the same scope, you cannot use the same name when using a guard statement if the optional variable is declared in the same scope. Optional parameters to a function can however be replaced using a guard statement using an equally named non-optional variable in the function.
    – Palle
    Jan 18, 2017 at 23:36
3

One may also use guard-let construct to unwrap optionals. However, guard creates a new variable which will exist outside the else statement so the naming options available for the unwrapped variable is different when compared to if-let construct.

Refer the code example below:

import Foundation

let str = Optional("Hello, Swift")

func sameName_guard() {
    // 1. All Good
    // This is fine since previous declaration of "str" is in a different scope
    guard let str = str else {
        return
    }

    print(str)
}

func differentName_guard() {
    let str1 = Optional("Hello, Swift")
    // 2. ERROR
    // This generates error as str1 is in the same scope
    guard let str1 = str1 else {
        return
    }

    print(str1)
}

sameName_guard()
differentName_guard()

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