138

I am making a simple application which requires colored output. How can I make my output colored like emacs and bash do?

I don't care about Windows, as my application is only for UNIX systems.

0
320

All modern terminal emulators use ANSI escape codes to show colours and other things.
Don't bother with libraries, the code is really simple.

More info is here.

Example in C:

#include <stdio.h>

#define ANSI_COLOR_RED     "\x1b[31m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_GREEN   "\x1b[32m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_YELLOW  "\x1b[33m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_BLUE    "\x1b[34m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_MAGENTA "\x1b[35m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_CYAN    "\x1b[36m"
#define ANSI_COLOR_RESET   "\x1b[0m"

int main (int argc, char const *argv[]) {

  printf(ANSI_COLOR_RED     "This text is RED!"     ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");
  printf(ANSI_COLOR_GREEN   "This text is GREEN!"   ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");
  printf(ANSI_COLOR_YELLOW  "This text is YELLOW!"  ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");
  printf(ANSI_COLOR_BLUE    "This text is BLUE!"    ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");
  printf(ANSI_COLOR_MAGENTA "This text is MAGENTA!" ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");
  printf(ANSI_COLOR_CYAN    "This text is CYAN!"    ANSI_COLOR_RESET "\n");

  return 0;
}
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  • 1
    But I suppose I can run bash in a terminal emulation that does not support ANSI escape seqs. – ShinTakezou Jul 10 '10 at 14:55
  • Nice flag :) Just a nit that the question is tagged 'c', not 'c++' – Stephen Jul 10 '10 at 15:05
  • @ShinTakezou: Yes.. In this case all the ANSI escape codes will be ignored, and you will have no options to make the fancy output. – Andrejs Cainikovs Jul 10 '10 at 15:07
  • 15
    ANSI escape sequences are not interpreted by shells, they are interpreted by terminal emulators. – ninjalj Jul 10 '10 at 15:33
  • 8
    Especially loved the "don't bother with libraries"! ANSI codes even work in the Windows command prompt. – SzG Dec 21 '15 at 22:13
15

Dealing with colour sequences can get messy and different systems might use different Colour Sequence Indicators.

I would suggest you try using ncurses. Other than colour, ncurses can do many other neat things with console UI.

1
  • Is using different color sequences the reason I cannot find a "colors.h" file with all that work done for me? – Cool Javelin Jan 27 '18 at 20:10
10

You can output special color control codes to get colored terminal output, here's a good resource on how to print colors.

For example:

printf("\033[22;34mHello, world!\033[0m");  // shows a blue hello world

EDIT: My original one used prompt color codes, which doesn't work :( This one does (I tested it).

5
  • edition.c: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’: edition.c:4: error: unknown escape sequence '\]' edition.c:4: error: unknown escape sequence '\]' edition.c edition.c~ Nothing more than a bunch of compile errors :( – user142019 Jul 10 '10 at 13:45
  • Also, my application should not be dependent on BASH. – user142019 Jul 10 '10 at 13:46
  • @Koning : This isn't BASH dependent, it works in other shells too (but I'm sure not all). I verified in ksh, and csh. Note I edited the control code to work properly. – Stephen Jul 10 '10 at 13:59
  • 2
    It won't be. It depends on terminal emulation. If it is ANSI understanding ANSI escape sequences, then you'll have your colours, bold, or whatever. – ShinTakezou Jul 10 '10 at 14:53
  • @Stephen Bonus: Change 22 by 1 to see it in bold. – hola Jul 31 '14 at 11:17
9

You can assign one color to every functionality to make it more useful.

#define Color_Red "\33[0:31m\\]" // Color Start
#define Color_end "\33[0m\\]" // To flush out prev settings
#define LOG_RED(X) printf("%s %s %s",Color_Red,X,Color_end)

foo()
{
LOG_RED("This is in Red Color");
}

Like wise you can select different color codes and make this more generic.

4
#include <stdio.h>

#define BLUE(string) "\x1b[34m" string "\x1b[0m"
#define RED(string) "\x1b[31m" string "\x1b[0m"

int main(void)
{
    printf("this is " RED("red") "!\n");

    // a somewhat more complex ...
    printf("this is " BLUE("%s") "!\n","blue");

    return 0;
}

reading Wikipedia:

  • \x1b[0m resets all attributes
  • \x1b[31m sets foreground color to red
  • \x1b[44m would set the background to blue.
  • both : \x1b[31;44m
  • both but inversed : \x1b[31;44;7m
  • remember to reset afterwards \x1b[0m ...
3

Because you can't print a character with string formating. You can also think of adding a format with something like this

#define PRINTC(c,f,s) printf ("\033[%dm" f "\033[0m", 30 + c, s)

f is format as in printf

PRINTC (4, "%s\n", "bar")

will print blue bar

PRINTC (1, "%d", 'a')

will print red 97

3

If you use same color for whole program , you can define printf() function.

   #include<stdio.h>
   #define ah_red "\e[31m"
   #define printf(X) printf(ah_red "%s",X);
   #int main()
   {
        printf("Bangladesh");
        printf("\n");
        return 0;
   }