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I'm trying to wrap my head around the message queue model and jobs that I want to implement in a PHP app:

  • My goal is to offload messages / data that needs to be sent to multiple third party APIs, so accessing them doesnt slow down the client. So sending the data to a message queue is ideal.

  • I considered using just Gearman to hold the MQ/Jobs, but I wanted to use a Cloud Queue service like SQS or Rackspace Cloud Queues so i wouldnt have to manage the messages.

  • Here's a diagram of what I think I should do:

enter image description here

Questions:

  • My workers, would be written in PHP they all have to be polling the cloud queue service? that could get expensive especially when you have a lot of workers.

  • I was thinking maybe have 1 worker just for polling the queue, and if there are messages, notify the other workers that they have jobs, i just have to keep this 1 worker online using supervisord perhaps? is this polling method better than using a MQ that can notify? How should I poll the MQ, once every second or as fast as it can poll? and then increase the polling workers if I see it slowing down?

  • I was also thinking of having a single queue for all the messages, then the worker monitoring that distributes the messages to other cloud MQs depending on where they need to be processed, since 1 message might need to be processed by 2 diff workers.

  • Would I still need gearman to manage my workers or can I just use supervisord to spin workers up and down?

  • Isn't it more effective and faster to also send a notification to the main worker whenever a message is sent vs polling the MQ? I assume I would the need to use gearman to notify my main worker that the MQ has a message, so it can start checking it. or if I have 300 messages per second, this would generate 300 jobs to check the MQ?

  • Basically how could I check the MQ as efficiently and as effectively as possible?

Suggestions or corrections to my architecture?

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  • For something that has to handle 300 messages per second, it'll be worth building a prototype to see if it scales correctly. Gearman would work, I expect, but there are plenty of queueing systems to choose from. As you say though, maybe a script that just works through a database queue might work fine.
    – halfer
    Aug 25, 2015 at 13:26
  • With Gearman, my understanding is there is no queue persistence if you get a server failure (waiting items need to be requeued). Consider how queued items are stored to disk, and how you would recover from them if your server crashes. If you have a database store of items to process (e.g. your script just with supervisord) then it will just pick up from where it left off.
    – halfer
    Aug 25, 2015 at 13:29
  • I believe the point of a proper queue is that if you have multiple worker nodes, the code to distribute work is already done for you. Workers cannot just help themselves to a queue item, since it might result in race conditions (an item of work gets claimed more than once).
    – halfer
    Aug 25, 2015 at 13:30
  • Yes I'm trying to figure out if I need gearman at all. I think a Cloud MQ Service would work well enough and my workers can help themselves to the queue as most Cloud MQs have a claiming process so that items can not be worked on by more than 1 worker. supervisord would run multiple workers to check the MQ. Here though I'm not sure how to manage the # of workers so I dont poll the MQ too much
    – kzap
    Aug 25, 2015 at 14:32
  • I don't know Cloud MQ, or AWS, at all - my only worry here is how much you are tying yourself to one cloud provider. If a queue is necessary, I'd be inclined towards a solution that works on any host.
    – halfer
    Aug 25, 2015 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

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My suggestions basically boil down to: Keep it simple!

With that in mind my first suggestion is to drop the DispatcherWorker. From my current understanding, the sole purpose of the worker is to listen to the MAIN queue and forward messages to the different task queues. Your application should take care of enqueuing the right message onto the right queue (or topic).

Answering your questions:

My workers, would be written in PHP they all have to be polling the cloud queue service? that could get expensive especially when you have a lot of workers.

Yes, there is no free lunch. Of course you could adapt and optimize your worker poll rate by application usage (when more messages arrive increase poll rate) by day/week time (if your users are active at specific times), and so on. Keep in mind that engineering costs might soon be higher than unoptimized polling.

Instead, you might consider push queues (see below).

I was thinking maybe have 1 worker just for polling the queue, and if there are messages, notify the other workers that they have jobs, i just have to keep this 1 worker online using supervisord perhaps? is this polling method better than using a MQ that can notify? How should I poll the MQ, once every second or as fast as it can poll? and then increase the polling workers if I see it slowing down?

This sounds too complicated. Communication is unreliable, there are reliable message queues however. If you don't want to loose data, stick to the message queues and don't invent custom protocols.

I was also thinking of having a single queue for all the messages, then the worker monitoring that distributes the messages to other cloud MQs depending on where they need to be processed, since 1 message might need to be processed by 2 diff workers.

As already mentioned, the application should enqueue your message to multiple queues as needed. This keeps things simple and in place.

Would I still need gearman to manage my workers or can I just use supervisord to spin workers up and down?

There are so many message queues and even more ways to use them. In general, if you are using poll queues you'll need to keep your workers alive by yourself. If however you are using push queues, the queue service will call an endpoint specified by you. Thus you'll just need to make sure your workers are available.

Basically how could I check the MQ as efficiently and as effectively as possible?

This depends on your business requirements and the job your workers do. What time spans are critical? Seconds, Minutes, Hours, Days? If you use workers to send emails, it shouldn't take hours, ideally a couple of seconds. Is there a difference (for the user) between polling every 3 seconds or every 15 seconds?

Solving your problem (with push queues):

My goal is to offload messages / data that needs to be sent to multiple third party APIs, so accessing them doesnt slow down the client. So sending the data to a message queue is ideal. I considered using just Gearman to hold the MQ/Jobs, but I wanted to use a Cloud Queue service like SQS or Rackspace Cloud Queues so i wouldnt have to manage the messages.

Indeed the scenario you describe is a good fit for message queues. As you mentioned you don't want to manage the message queue itself, maybe you do not want to manage the workers either? This is where push queues pop in.

Push queues basically call your worker. For example, Amazon ElasticBeanstalk Worker Environments do the heavy lifting (polling) in the background and simply call your application with an HTTP request containing the queue message (refer to the docs for details). I have personally used the AWS push queues and have been happy with how easy they are. Note, that there are other push queue providers like Iron.io.

As you mentioned you are using PHP, there is the QPush Bundle for Symfony, which handles incoming message requests. You may have a look at the code to roll your own solution.

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    Thanks, you are right. I should keep things simple and the application sends to the right queue. I did end up going with poll queues, but used a variation of Illuminate Queue from Laravel: github.com/illuminate/queue It comes with support for different message queues and has pushers, listeners and workers. I learned a lot reading through its code. I now have a 3 queues, a high, normal and low priority queue and the application pushes to the right queue and the workers process all queues in order of importance.
    – kzap
    Sep 22, 2015 at 12:43
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I would recommend a different route, and that would be to use sockets. ZMQ is an example of a socket based library already written. With sockets you can create a Q and manage what to do with messages as they come in. The machine will be in stand-by mode and use minimal resources while waiting for a message to come in.

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  • I would look into this in the future when needing very fast responses and not requiring a persistent queue from different backends.
    – kzap
    Sep 22, 2015 at 12:47

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