I would like a list of 2d numpy arrays (x,y) , where each x is in {-5, -4.5, -4, -3.5, ..., 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5} and the same for y.

I could do

x = np.arange(-5, 5.1, 0.5)
y = np.arange(-5, 5.1, 0.5)

and then iterate through all possible pairs, but I'm sure there's a nicer way...

I would like something back that looks like:

[[-5, -5],
 [-5, -4.5],
 [-5, -4],
 ...
 [5, 5]]

but the order does not matter.

  • 1
    Do you have a question? Edit: I see the question xy = np.matrix([x, y]) – Andy Kubiak Aug 25 '15 at 15:44
  • This just concatenates the two arrays. – Hilemonstoer Aug 25 '15 at 15:52
  • 2
    Sometimes adding python-2 or -3 in your tags can help you get just what you need. – uhoh Aug 25 '15 at 16:21
up vote 30 down vote accepted

You can use np.mgrid for this, it's often more convenient than np.meshgrid because it creates the arrays in one step:

import numpy as np
X,Y = np.mgrid[-5:5.1:0.5, -5:5.1:0.5]

For linspace-like functionality, replace the step (i.e. 0.5) with a complex number whose magnitude specifies the number of points you want in the series. Using this syntax, the same arrays as above are specified as:

X, Y = np.mgrid[-5:5:21j, -5:5:21j]

You can then create your pairs as:

xy = np.vstack((X.flatten(), Y.flatten())).T

As @ali_m suggested, this can all be done in one line:

xy = np.mgrid[-5:5.1:0.5, -5:5.1:0.5].reshape(2,-1).T

Best of luck!

  • 2
    so that's what mgrid is for! – uhoh Aug 25 '15 at 16:07
  • 11
    ...or as a one-liner, xy = np.mgrid[-5:5.1:0.5, -5:5.1:0.5].reshape(2, -1).T – ali_m Aug 25 '15 at 16:41

I think you want np.meshgrid:

Return coordinate matrices from coordinate vectors.

Make N-D coordinate arrays for vectorized evaluations of N-D scalar/vector fields over N-D grids, given one-dimensional coordinate arrays x1, x2,..., xn.

import numpy as np
x = np.arange(-5, 5.1, 0.5)
y = np.arange(-5, 5.1, 0.5)
X,Y = np.meshgrid(x,y)

you can convert that to your desired output with

XY=np.array([X.flatten(),Y.flatten()]).T

print XY
array([[-5. , -5. ],
       [-4.5, -5. ],
       [-4. , -5. ],
       [-3.5, -5. ],
       [-3. , -5. ],
       [-2.5, -5. ],
       ....
       [ 3. ,  5. ],
       [ 3.5,  5. ],
       [ 4. ,  5. ],
       [ 4.5,  5. ],
       [ 5. ,  5. ]])
  • This gives back two large matrices that I think I would still need to iterate over in order to get my desired matrix of pairs. Am I wrong? – Hilemonstoer Aug 25 '15 at 15:56
  • See my edit: you can convert it to your desired array pretty easily with no iteration – tmdavison Aug 25 '15 at 16:01

If you just want to iterate through pairs (and not do calculations on the whole set of points at once), you may be best served by itertools.product to iterate through all possible pairs:

import itertools

for (xi, yi) in itertools.product(x, y):
    print(xi, yi)

This avoids generating large matrices via meshgrid.

Not sure if I understand the question - to make a list of 2-element NumPy arrays, this works:

import numpy as np
x = np.arange(-5, 5.1, 0.5)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, x)
Liszt = [np.array(thing) for thing in zip(X.flatten(), Y.flatten())] # for python 2.7

zip gives you a list of tuples, and the list comprehension does the rest.

We can use arrange function as:

z1 = np.array([np.array(np.arange(1,5)),np.array(np.arange(1,5))])
print(z1)
o/p=> [[1 2 3 4]
       [1 2 3 4]]

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