42

I have few tables with big amount of data (about 100 million records). So I can't store this data in memory but I would like to stream this result set using java.util.stream class and pass this stream to another class. I read about Stream.of and Stream.Builder operators but they are buffered streams in memory. So is there any way to resolve this question? Thanks in advance.

UPDATE #1

Okay I googled and found jooq library. I'm not sure but looks like it could be applicable to my test case. To summarize I have few tables with big amount of data. I would like to stream my resultset and transfer this stream to another method. Something like this:

// why return Stream<String>? Because my result set has String type
private Stream<Record> writeTableToStream(DataSource dataSource, String table) {

    Stream<Record> record = null;
    try (Connection connection = dataSource.getConnection()) {
        String sql = "select * from " + table;

        try (PreparedStatement pSt = connection.prepareStatement(sql)) {
            connection.setAutoCommit(false);
            pSt.setFetchSize(5000);
            ResultSet resultSet = pSt.executeQuery();
            //
            record = DSL.using(connection)
                    .fetch(resultSet).stream();
        }
    } catch (SQLException sqlEx) {
        logger.error(sqlEx);
    }

    return record;
}

Could please someone advise, am I on correct way? Thanks.

UPDATE #2

I made some experiment on jooq and could say now that above decision is not suitable for me. This code record = DSL.using(connection).fetch(resultSet).stream(); takes too much time

  • 1
    Beware that not all streams are the same kind of stream. java.util.stream.Stream may not actually be suited for what you have in mind. – Louis Wasserman Aug 25 '15 at 16:32
  • 1
    ResultSet is like a stream. You can only process one row of the result at once. Or do you want to process the ResultSet with the streaming api? – Flown Aug 25 '15 at 16:43
  • I would like to wrap ResultSet to java 8 stream and pass this stream object to another class. In another class I would like to iterate over this stream and write the results to File. – Iurii Aug 25 '15 at 16:56
  • 1
    This is quite close to some of my work which I described here, maybe you'll find it useful. – Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '15 at 8:42
69

The first thing you have to understand is that code like

try (Connection connection = dataSource.getConnection()) {
    …
    try (PreparedStatement pSt = connection.prepareStatement(sql)) {
        …
        return stream;
    }
}

does not work as by the time you leave the try blocks, the resources are closed while the processing of the Stream hasn’t even started.

The resource management construct “try with resources” works for resources used within a block scope inside a method but you are creating a factory method returning a resource. Therefore you have to ensure that the closing of the returned stream will close the resources and the caller is responsible for closing the Stream.


Further, you need a function which produces an item out of a single line from the ResultSet. Supposing, you have a method like

Record createRecord(ResultSet rs) {
    …
}

you may create a Stream<Record> basically like

Stream<Record> stream = StreamSupport.stream(new Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<Record>(
    Long.MAX_VALUE,Spliterator.ORDERED) {
        @Override
        public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super Record> action) {
            if(!resultSet.next()) return false;
            action.accept(createRecord(resultSet));
            return true;
        }
    }, false);

But to do it correctly you have to incorporate the exception handling and closing of resources. You can use Stream.onClose to register an action that will be performed when the Stream gets closed, but it has to be a Runnable which can not throw checked exceptions. Similarly the tryAdvance method is not allowed to throw checked exceptions. And since we can’t simply nest try(…) blocks here, the program logic of suppression exceptions thrown in close, when there is already a pending exception, doesn’t come for free.

To help us here, we introduce a new type which can wrap closing operations which may throw checked exceptions and deliver them wrapped in an unchecked exception. By implementing AutoCloseable itself, it can utilize the try(…) construct to chain close operations safely:

interface UncheckedCloseable extends Runnable, AutoCloseable {
    default void run() {
        try { close(); } catch(Exception ex) { throw new RuntimeException(ex); }
    }
    static UncheckedCloseable wrap(AutoCloseable c) {
        return c::close;
    }
    default UncheckedCloseable nest(AutoCloseable c) {
        return ()->{ try(UncheckedCloseable c1=this) { c.close(); } };
    }
}

With this, the entire operation becomes:

private Stream<Record> tableAsStream(DataSource dataSource, String table)
    throws SQLException {

    UncheckedCloseable close=null;
    try {
        Connection connection = dataSource.getConnection();
        close=UncheckedCloseable.wrap(connection);
        String sql = "select * from " + table;
        PreparedStatement pSt = connection.prepareStatement(sql);
        close=close.nest(pSt);
        connection.setAutoCommit(false);
        pSt.setFetchSize(5000);
        ResultSet resultSet = pSt.executeQuery();
        close=close.nest(resultSet);
        return StreamSupport.stream(new Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<Record>(
            Long.MAX_VALUE,Spliterator.ORDERED) {
            @Override
            public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super Record> action) {
                try {
                    if(!resultSet.next()) return false;
                    action.accept(createRecord(resultSet));
                    return true;
                } catch(SQLException ex) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(ex);
                }
            }
        }, false).onClose(close);
    } catch(SQLException sqlEx) {
        if(close!=null)
            try { close.close(); } catch(Exception ex) { sqlEx.addSuppressed(ex); }
        throw sqlEx;
    }
}

This method wraps the necessary close operation for all resources, Connection, Statement and ResultSet within one instance of the utility class described above. If an exception happens during the initialization, the close operation is performed immediately and the exception is delivered to the caller. If the stream construction succeeds, the close operation is registered via onClose.

Therefore the caller has to ensure proper closing like

try(Stream<Record> s=tableAsStream(dataSource, table)) {
    // stream operation
}

Note that also the delivery of an SQLException via RuntimeException has been added to the tryAdvance method. Therefore you may now add throws SQLException to the createRecord method without problems.

  • up-vote first. I think stream.onClose(UncheckedCloseable.wrap(resource)::close) is more expressiveness and RuntimeException can be replaced with UncheckedIOException. what do you think? – holi-java Apr 26 '17 at 6:55
  • @holi-java: ::close would be again referring to the method which can throw checked exceptions, hence, what you suggest would be rejected by the compiler. Besides that, I don’t think that it is necessary to make it explicit that passing a resource to onClose will eventually invoke its close method. UncheckedIOException is suitable for wrapping an IOException, but not for a general solution, especially not in this answer, where we have to deal with SQLException. – Holger Apr 27 '17 at 7:17
  • 1
    I have made a simple library to do just this. It's designed to be thread-safe (streams are parallel) and you can even let the resources be cleaned up automatically. Requires Java 10. github.com/claudemartin/streamed-sql – Claude Martin Jul 29 '18 at 17:48
  • 1
    @ClaudeMartin you don’t need to insert a synchronized in the tryAdvance method. The code is already usable with parallel streams as is. It’s the contract of the Spliterator interface that a single instance is never accessed concurrently, just like with an Iterator. The key point for parallel processing is that a new Spliterator instance is created via trySplit, to be processed by other threads. Since a single ResultSet can’t be split, you’re fine with the inherited trySplit implementation which will buffer some element into an array and return an array spliterator for them. – Holger Jul 30 '18 at 12:03
  • 1
    @ThorbjørnRavnAndersen yes, but this would be a different code structure than a Stream returning method. Both variants exist, e.g. this answer is like, e.g. Files.lines​(…), works, whereas your suggestion is like JDK 9+ StackWalker.walk(…) works. – Holger Jan 7 at 8:12
11

jOOQ

I'm going to answer the jOOQ part of your question. As of jOOQ 3.8, there have now been quite a few additional features related to combining jOOQ with Stream. Other usages are also documented on this jOOQ page.

Your suggested usage:

You tried this:

Stream<Record> stream = DSL.using(connection).fetch(resultSet).stream();

Indeed, this doesn't work well for large result sets because fetch(ResultSet) fetches the entire result set into memory and then calls Collection.stream() on it.

Better (lazy) usage:

Instead, you could write this:

try (Stream<Record> stream = DSL.using(connection).fetchStream(resultSet)) {
    ...
}

... which is essentially convenience for this:

try (Cursor<Record> cursor = DSL.using(connection).fetchLazy(resultSet)) {
    Stream<Record> stream = cursor.stream();
    ...
}

See also DSLContext.fetchStream(ResultSet)

Of course, you could also let jOOQ execute your SQL string, rather than wrestling with JDBC:

try (Stream<Record> stream = 
     DSL.using(dataSource)
        .resultQuery("select * from {0}", DSL.name(table)) // Prevent SQL injection
        .fetchSize(5000)
        .fetchStream()) {
    ...
}

On try-with-resources usage

Do note that a Stream produced by jOOQ is "resourceful", i.e. it contains a reference to an open ResultSet (and PreparedStatement). So, if you really want to return that stream outside of your method, make sure it is closed properly!

4

I'm not aware of any well-known library that will do it for you.

That said, this article shows how to wrap the resultset with an Iterator (ResultSetIterator) and pass it as the first parameter to Spliterators.spliteratorUnknownSize() in order to create a Spliterator.

The Spliterator can then be used by StreamSupport in order to create a Stream on top of it.

Their suggested implementation of ResultSetIterator class:

public class ResultSetIterator implements Iterator {

    private ResultSet rs;
    private PreparedStatement ps;
    private Connection connection;
    private String sql;

    public ResultSetIterator(Connection connection, String sql) {
        assert connection != null;
        assert sql != null;
        this.connection = connection;
        this.sql = sql;
    }

    public void init() {
        try {
            ps = connection.prepareStatement(sql);
            rs = ps.executeQuery();

        } catch (SQLException e) {
            close();
            throw new DataAccessException(e);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        if (ps == null) {
            init();
        }
        try {
            boolean hasMore = rs.next();
            if (!hasMore) {
                close();
            }
            return hasMore;
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            close();
            throw new DataAccessException(e);
        }

    }

    private void close() {
        try {
            rs.close();
            try {
                ps.close();
            } catch (SQLException e) {
                //nothing we can do here
            }
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            //nothing we can do here
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Tuple next() {
        try {
            return SQL.rowAsTuple(sql, rs);
        } catch (DataAccessException e) {
            close();
            throw e;
        }
    }
}

and then:

public static Stream stream(final Connection connection, 
                                       final String sql, 
                                       final Object... parms) {
  return StreamSupport
                .stream(Spliterators.spliteratorUnknownSize(
                        new ResultSetIterator(connection, sql), 0), false);
}
  • 2
    Note that for short-circuit stream operation the iterator can be abandoned in any moment leaving the non-closed ResultSet. It's better to create a closeable Stream and require to close it explicitly after the operation. Also why raw-types in Java-8? – Tagir Valeev Aug 26 '15 at 1:57
  • 4
    Every stream can be closed (as AutoCloseable), but by default this does nothing. You can add a close handler like StreamSupport.stream(...).onClose(myIterator::close) (store the ResultSetIterator into myIterator variable). You can require to close it writing the proper JavaDoc like it's done for Files.lines method (If timely disposal of file system resources is required, the try-with-resources construct should be used blah blah). – Tagir Valeev Aug 26 '15 at 4:31
  • 4
    First of all, you should not use raw types. Second, the Iterator is broken as hasNext() has an unexpected side-effect as it will advance to the next line. This is not a theoretical issue.. Note that you can fix it and half the code size by implementing a Spliterator. Finally that unused varargs parameter parms is asking for trouble. – Holger Aug 26 '15 at 15:17
  • 1
    There is no contract that hasNext() and next() are paired and I already linked to a question showing the Streams —and you are creating a stream out of the iterator— do call hasNext more than once occasionally. You can’t make up your own contract and declare that the stream API has to adhere to it. As proven, that doesn’t work. – Holger Aug 26 '15 at 15:37
  • 1
    As already said, you can fix it by making the code simpler by implementing a Spliterator instead of an Iterator. – Holger Aug 26 '15 at 15:47
3

Here is the simplest sample by abacus-jdbc.

final DataSource ds = JdbcUtil.createDataSource(url, user, password);
final SQLExecutor sqlExecutor = new SQLExecutor(ds);
sqlExecutor.stream(sql, parameters);

Disclosure: I'm the developer of AbacusUtil.

  • After a quick peek at AbacusUtil it looks to me that this is a gigantic library which I would be very reluctant to include in a solution. You may want to split it up in smaller modules where I could pick only what I actually needed? – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 25 '18 at 19:21
  • Splitted into four projects: abacus-util, abacus-jdbc, abacus-da, abacus-android since 1.8.2. – msangel 19 hours ago
-1

I just did the summary to provide the real example about how to stream ResultSet and do the simple SQL query without using 3rd click here for detail

Blockquote: Java 8 provided the Stream family and easy operation of it. The way of pipeline usage made the code clear and smart. However, ResultSet is still go with very legacy way to process. Per actual ResultSet usage, it is really helpful if converted as Stream.

.... StreamUtils.uncheckedConsumer is required to convert the the SQLException to runtimeException to make the Lamda clear.

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