I'm trying to write a unit test for a controller using Zend and PHPUnit

In the code I get data from php://input

$req = new Zend_Controller_Request_Http();
$data = $req->getRawBody();

My code works fine when I test the real application, but unless I can supply data as a raw http post, $data will always be blank. The getRawBody() method basically calls file_get_contents('php://input'), but how do I override this in order to supply the test data to my application.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Provided the $req->getRawBody() is, as you say, the same as file_get_contents('php://input')...

$test = true; /* Set to TRUE when using Unit Tests */

$req = new Zend_Controller_Request_Http();
if( $test )
  $data = file_get_contents( 'testfile.txt' );
else
  $data = $req->getRawBody();

Not a perfect solution, but similar to what I have used in the past when designing scripts to handle piped emails with great success.

  • Yeap, not a perfect solution, but how I've decided to implement it too. Thanks. – john ryan Jul 12 '10 at 21:45
  • I wouldn't recommend this solution -- using if statements to perform different code in unit tests versus production. You ideally want your code to execute the same logical statements in both worlds. See @MitMaro's solution below which uses a configurable input path. – Michael Butler Nov 10 '16 at 23:04

I had the same problem and the way I fixed it was to have the 'php://input' string as a variable that is settable at run time. I know this does not really apply directly to this question as it would require modifying the Zend Framework. But all the same it may be helpful to someone.

For example:

<?php
class Foo {

    public function read() {
        return file_get_contents('php://input');
    } 
}

would become

<?php
class Foo {

    public $_fileIn = 'php://input';

    public function read() {
        return file_get_contents($this->_fileIn);
    }

}

Then in my unit test I can do:

<?php
$obj = new Foo();
$obj->_fileIn = 'my_input_data.dat';
assertTrue('foo=bar', $obj->read());
  • 2
    you also could have a protected property and change it to public using reflection in the tests. So for production your code is a little cleaner. (Assuming php 5.3) – edorian Apr 23 '11 at 4:02

You could try mocking the object in your unit tests. Something like this:

$req = $this->getMock('Zend_Controller_Request_Http', array('getRawBody'));
$req->method('getRawBody')
    ->will($this->returnValue('raw_post_data_to_return'));
  • so this would work if I was passing Zend_Controller_Request_Http object into the code I was testing, unfortunately the controller handles all this under the hood. So I think the only way to do it is to change my application to test for the environment I'm in and handle the special case. – john ryan Jul 12 '10 at 21:44

Zend_Controller_Request_HttpTestCase contains methods for setting and getting various http request/responses.

For example: $req = new Zend_Controller_Request_HttpTestCase; $req->setCookie('cookie', 'TRUE'); $test = $this->controller->cookieAction($req); $this->assertSame($test, TRUE);

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