18

I'm running into an odd problem using FileReader.readAsArrayBuffer that only seems to affect Firefox (I tested in the current version - v40). I can't tell if I'm just doing something wrong or if this is a Firefox bug.

I have some JavaScript that uses readAsArrayBuffer to read a file specified in an <input> field. Under normal circumstances, everything works correctly. However, if the user modifies the file after selecting it in the <input> field, readAsArrayBuffer can get very confused.

The ArrayBuffer I get back from readAsArrayBuffer always has the length that the file was originally. If the user changes the file to make it larger, I don't get any of the bytes after the original size. If the user changes the file to make it smaller, the buffer is still the same size and the 'excess' in the buffer is filled with character codes 90 (capital letter 'Z' if viewed as a string).

Since this code is so simple and works perfectly in every other browser I tested, I'm thinking it's a Firefox issue. I've reported it as a bug to Firefox but I want to make sure this isn't just something obvious I'm doing wrong.

The behavior can be reproduced by the following code snippet. All you have to do is:

  1. Browse for a text file that has 10 characters in it (10 is not a magic number - I'm just using it as an example)
  2. Observe that the result is an array of 10 items representing the character codes of each item
  3. While this is still running, delete 5 characters from the file and save
  4. Observe that the result is still an array of 10 items - the first 5 are correct but the last 5 are all 90 (capital letter Z)
  5. Now added 10 characters (so the file is now 15 characters long)
  6. Observe that the result is still an array of 10 items - the last 5 are not returned

function ReadFile() {
  var input = document.getElementsByTagName("input")[0];
  var output = document.getElementsByTagName("textarea")[0];

  if (input.files.length === 0) {
    output.value = 'No file selected';
    window.setTimeout(ReadFile, 1000);
    return;
  }

  var fr = new FileReader();
  fr.onload = function() {
    var data = fr.result;
    var array = new Int8Array(data);
    output.value = JSON.stringify(array, null, '  ');
    window.setTimeout(ReadFile, 1000);
  };
  fr.readAsArrayBuffer(input.files[0]);

  //These two methods work correctly
  //fr.readAsText(input.files[0]);
  //fr.readAsBinaryString(input.files[0]);
}

ReadFile();
<input type="file" />
<br/>
<textarea cols="80" rows="10"></textarea>

In case the snippet does not work, the sample code is also available as a JSFiddle here: https://jsfiddle.net/Lv5y9m2u/

  • Firefox may have problems with that indeed... Attempting to load the fiddle crashed my Nightly. Now it works, though. – Oriol Aug 25 '15 at 23:15
  • @Oriol As part of testing this small repro and my bigger app that uses this logic, I ran into lots of crashes in Firefox. :-( I don't use Firefox (except to test cross-browser compatibility) so I wasn't sure if Firefox is just buggy in general, buggy with FileReader or what. No offense intended for Firefox fans – Stephen McDaniel Aug 25 '15 at 23:20
  • Maybe related to the fact that FF doesn't update the input's files if the name is the same (no onchange event fired) – Kaiido Aug 26 '15 at 1:28
  • Could not reproduce at nightly 34 – guest271314 Sep 5 '15 at 1:37
  • Here is another bug report: bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1260606 – Nayuki Jun 8 '16 at 6:33
11
+50

Interesting, looks like Firefox is caching the buffer size even the file is modified.

You can refer to this link, replaced readAsArrayBuffer with is custom functionality which uses readAsBinaryString. Its working fine in Firefox and Chrome

function ReadFile() {
var input = document.getElementsByTagName("input")[0];
var output = document.getElementsByTagName("textarea")[0];

if (input.files.length === 0) {
    output.value = 'No file selected';
    window.setTimeout(ReadFile, 1000);
    return;
}

var fr = new FileReader();
fr.onload = function () {
    var data = fr.result;
    var array = new Int8Array(data);
    output.value = JSON.stringify(array, null, '  ');
    window.setTimeout(ReadFile, 1000);
};
fr.readAsArrayBuffer(input.files[0]);



//These two methods work correctly
//fr.readAsText(input.files[0]);
//fr.readAsBinaryString(input.files[0]);
}
if (FileReader.prototype.readAsArrayBuffer && FileReader.prototype.readAsBinaryString) {
    FileReader.prototype.readAsArrayBuffer = function readAsArrayBuffer () {
        this.readAsBinaryString.apply(this, arguments);
        this.__defineGetter__('resultString', this.__lookupGetter__('result'));
        this.__defineGetter__('result', function () {
            var string = this.resultString;
            var result = new Uint8Array(string.length);
            for (var i = 0; i < string.length; i++) {
                result[i] = string.charCodeAt(i);
            }
            return result.buffer;
        });
    };
}
ReadFile();
  • 1
    Unfortunately, readAsBinaryString isn't supported in even the latest version of IE. See: caniuse.com/#search=filereader . Perhaps I could apply your workaround only when readAsBinaryString exists (after all, readAsArrayBuffer seems to work fine in IE) – Stephen McDaniel Sep 4 '15 at 20:46
  • 2
    I've updated this answer to include a check for the existence of readAsBinaryString. That lets this code work in IE. It now fulfills everything I needed - it works across all the browsers I need and it's easy to just drop into my existing codebase without changing anything. It will also be easy to remove in the future if/when the Firefox bug is fixed. – Stephen McDaniel Sep 7 '15 at 23:49
5

I think you are hitting a bug of Firefox. However, as you pointed out, readAsArrayBuffer behaves correctly in every supported browser except Firefox while readAsBinaryString is supported by every browser except IE.

Therefore, it is possible to prefer readAsBinaryString when it exists and fail back to readAsArrayBuffer otherwise.

function readFileAsArrayBuffer(file, success, error) {
    var fr = new FileReader();
    fr.addEventListener('error', error, false);
    if (fr.readAsBinaryString) {
        fr.addEventListener('load', function () {
            var string = this.resultString != null ? this.resultString : this.result;
            var result = new Uint8Array(string.length);
            for (var i = 0; i < string.length; i++) {
                result[i] = string.charCodeAt(i);
            }
            success(result.buffer);
        }, false);
        return fr.readAsBinaryString(file);
    } else {
        fr.addEventListener('load', function () {
            success(this.result);
        }, false);
        return fr.readAsArrayBuffer(file);
    }
}

Usage:

readFileAsArrayBuffer(input.files[0], function(data) {
    var array = new Int8Array(data);
    output.value = JSON.stringify(array, null, '  ');
    window.setTimeout(ReadFile, 1000);
}, function (e) {
    console.error(e);
});

Working fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/Lv5y9m2u/6/

Browser Support:

  • Firefox: Uses readAsBinaryString, which is not problematic.
  • IE >= 10: Uses readAsArrayBuffer which is supported.
  • IE <= 9: The entire FileReader API is not supported.
  • Almost all other browsers: Uses readAsBinaryString.
  • 1
    Thanks, your solution is good. I've accepted Pavan's because that code is easy to just drop into an existing app without having to change anything. Since this is (hopefully) a temporary bug to workaround, having a simple drop-in fix is just what I need. – Stephen McDaniel Sep 7 '15 at 23:47

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