How do I stop the flash of unstyled content (FOUC) on a web page?

  • This happens many a times if we have the link tag of style sheets referred at the bottom of the web page. – RBT Jun 18 '16 at 23:47
up vote 4 down vote accepted

What I've done to avoid FOUC is:

  • Set the body section as: <body style="visibility: hidden;" onload="js_Load()">

  • Write a js_Load() JavaScript function: document.body.style.visibility='visible';

With this approach the body of my web page is kept hidden until the full page and CSS files are loaded. Once everything is loaded, the onload event turns the body visible. So, the web browser remains empty until a point when everything pops up on the screen.

It is a simple solution but so far it is working.

  • 37
    Not good if a viewer does not have javascript enabled, because then they won't see a thing. – Stefan Mar 29 '12 at 14:29
  • 12
    -1 for suggesting a solution that will show NOTHING for users who don't have javascript enabled, or are on a screen reader that doesn't support javascript, or who are behind a corporate firewall that blocks javascript. Googling "eliminate flash of unwanted content" will show numerous approaches that don't have this flaw. For example, Stefan's answer (a year later) is much safer. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 12 '14 at 2:06
  • 7
    You really should add <noscript><style>body { visibility: visible; }</style></noscript> at the end so that the site will work with JS disabled too. – tomasz86 May 16 '16 at 1:51
  • Corporate firewalls blocking Javascript? A reason to change the company... – unwichtich Nov 7 at 16:07

The problem with using a css style to initially hide some page elements, and then using javascript to change the style back to visible after page load, is that people who don't have javascript enabled will never get to see those elements. So it's a solution which does not degrade gracefully.

A better way therefore, is to use javascript to both initially hide as well as redisplay those elements after page load. Using jQuery, we might be tempted to do something like this:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('body').hide();
    $(window).on('load', function() {
        $('body').show();
    });
});

However, if your page is very big with a lot of elements, then this code won't be applied soon enough (the document body won't be ready soon enough) and you might still see a FOUC. However, there is one element that we CAN hide as soon as script is encountered in the head, even before the document is ready: the HTML tag. So we could do something like this:

<html>
  <head>
  <!-- Other stuff like title and meta tags go here -->
  <style type="text/css">
    .hidden {display:none;}
  </style>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="/scripts/jquery.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
    $('html').addClass('hidden');
    $(document).ready(function() {    // EDIT: From Adam Zerner's comment below: Rather use load: $(window).on('load', function () {...});
      $('html').show();  // EDIT: Can also use $('html').removeClass('hidden'); 
     });  
   </script>
   </head>
   <body>
   <!-- Body Content -->
   </body>
</html>

Note that the jQuery addClass() method is called *outside* of the .ready() (or better, .on('load')) method.

  • 3
    To me it seems cleaner to replace $('html').show()' with $('html').removeClass('hidden');. This makes it clearer that the ready function is undoing the addClass. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 12 '14 at 2:22
  • 5
    UPDATE: Just tested this approach. The current version of jQuery REQUIRES this to be done using removeClass (as I suggest) rather than show (as in the original answer) -- otherwise the html will NEVER show. I believe jQuery's show() now explicitly looks for and restores any display state from css styling, to avoid interfering with styling. Therefore, it is necessary to actually remove the 'hidden' class. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 12 '14 at 2:40
  • 1
    Works perfectly. Opted for the removeClass option rather than show() – FurryWombat Feb 21 '15 at 20:12
  • 1
    What about a CSS only solution where you have <style>html { display: none; }</style> in the <head>, and then your real styles right before </body>? – Adam Zerner May 5 '17 at 20:21
  • 1
    Shouldn't we be looking for the load event instead of ready? With load, we know the CSS will be ready. With ready, we don't know the CSS will be ready. – Adam Zerner May 5 '17 at 20:24

A solution which doesn't depend on jQuery, which will work on all current browsers and do nothing on old browsers, include the following in your head tag:

<head>
    ...

    <style type="text/css">
        .fouc-fix { display:none; }
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        try {
            var elm=document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0];
            var old=elm.class || "";
            elm.class=old+" fouc-fix";
            document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded",function(event) {
                elm.class=old;
                });
            }
        catch(thr) {
            }
    </script>
</head>

Thanks to @justastudent, I tried just setting elm.style.display="none"; and it appears to work as desired, at least in current Firefox Quantum. So here is a more compact solution, being, so far, the simplest thing I've found that works.

<script type="text/javascript">
    var elm=document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0];
    elm.style.display="none";
    document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded",function(event) { elm.style.display="block"; });
</script>
  • the mentioned code did not work for me, here's my version: try{ var html=document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0]; document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) {html.className=''; }); html.className='fouc'; } catch(err) {} – Manfred Wuits May 24 '16 at 8:04
  • I like this approach, but would like to suggest the usage of the classList API. – Just a student Sep 15 '17 at 11:00
  • 2
    In fact, why use the separate CSS in the first place? Why not do elm.style.display = 'none'; and then undoing that with elm.style.removeProperty('display');? – Just a student Sep 15 '17 at 11:15
  • @Justastudent : Because that would display a blank page in the event that Javascript is disabled. – Lawrence Dol Sep 15 '17 at 18:54
  • 1
    @Justastudent: Thanks. I tried that, and it works, at least in current browsers. Answer augmented. – Lawrence Dol Oct 2 '17 at 21:21

A CSS-only solution:

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      html {
        display: none;
      }
    </style>
    ...
  </head>
  <body>
    ...
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="app.css"> <!-- should set html { display: block; } -->
  </body>
</html>

As the browser parses through the HTML file:

  • The first thing it will do is hide <html>.
  • The last thing it will do is load the styles, and then display all the content with styling applied.

The advantage to this over a solution that uses JavaScript is that it will work for users even if they have JavaScript disabled.

Note: you are allowed to put <link> inside of <body>. I do see it as a downside though, because it violates common practice. It would be nice if there was a defer attribute for <link> like there is for <script>, because that would allow us to put it in the <head> and still accomplish our goal.

  • 1
    Useful to know that display: none will also hide the background image or color. Since my website has a dark theme, it would flash white. Using visibility: hidden was better for my case. – Kamdroid Sep 18 at 2:50

An other quick fix which also works in Firefox Quantum is an empty <script> tag in the <head>. This however, penalizes your pagespeed insights and overall load time.

I had 100% success with it. I think it's also the main reason, why above solutions with other JS in the works.

<script type="text/javascript">

</script>

No one has talked about CSS @import

That was the problem for me i was loading two extra style sheets directly in my css file with @import

Simple solution: Replace all @import links with <link />

This is the one that has worked for me and does not require javascript and it works great for pages with many elements and lots of css:

First, add a dedicated <STYLE> setting for the <HTML> tag with visibility 'hidden' and opacity as '0' at the top of your HTML, e.g, in the beginning of the <HEAD> element, for example, at the top of your HTML add:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
    <style>html{visibility: hidden;opacity:0;}</style>

Then, at the end of your last .css stylesheet file, set the visibility and opacity styles to 'visible' and '1', respectively:

html {
    visibility: visible;
    opacity: 1;
}

If you already have an existing style block for the 'html' tag, then move the entire 'html' style to the end of the last .css file and add the 'visibility' and 'opacity' tags as described above.

https://gist.github.com/electrotype/7960ddcc44bc4aea07a35603d1c41cb0

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