5

I recently came across this question - Given a binary string, check if we can partition/split the string into 0..n parts such that each part is a power of 5. Return the minimum number of splits, if it can be done.

Examples would be:

input = "101101" - returns 1, as the string can be split once to form "101" and "101",as 101= 5^1.
input = "1111101" - returns 0, as the string itself is 5^3.
input = "100"- returns -1, as it can't be split into power(s) of 5.

I came up with this recursive algorithm:

  1. Check if the string itself is a power of 5. if yes, return 0
  2. Else, iterate over the string character by character, checking at every point if the number seen so far is a power of 5. If yes, add 1 to split count and check the rest of the string recursively for powers of 5 starting from step 1.
  3. return the minimum number of splits seen so far.

I implemented the above algo in Java. I believe it works alright, but it's a straightforward recursive solution. Can this be solved using dynamic programming to improve the run time?

The code is below:

public int partition(String inp){
    if(inp==null || inp.length()==0)
        return 0;
    return partition(inp,inp.length(),0);
}
public int partition(String inp,int len,int index){
    if(len==index)
        return 0;
    if(isPowerOfFive(inp,index))
        return 0;
    long sub=0;
    int count = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    for(int i=index;i<len;++i){
        sub = sub*2 +(inp.charAt(i)-'0');
        if(isPowerOfFive(sub))
            count = Math.min(count,1+partition(inp,len,i+1));
    }
    return count;
}

Helper functions:

public boolean isPowerOfFive(String inp,int index){
    long sub = 0;
    for(int i=index;i<inp.length();++i){
        sub = sub*2 +(inp.charAt(i)-'0');
    }
    return isPowerOfFive(sub);
}

public boolean isPowerOfFive(long val){
    if(val==0)
        return true;
    if(val==1)
        return false;
    while(val>1){
        if(val%5 != 0)
            return false;
        val = val/5;
    }
    return true;
}
  • What is constraint on input length? – Khatri Oct 30 '15 at 10:24
3

Here is simple improvements that can be done:

  • Calculate all powers of 5 before start, so you could do checks faster.
  • Stop split input string if the number of splits is already greater than in the best split you've already done.

Here is my solution using these ideas:

public static List<String> powers = new ArrayList<String>();
public static int bestSplit = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    // input string (5^5, 5^1, 5^10)
    String inp = "110000110101101100101010000001011111001";
    // calc all powers of 5 that fits in given string
    for (int pow = 1; ; ++pow) {
        String powStr = Long.toBinaryString((long) Math.pow(5, pow));
        if (powStr.length() <= inp.length()) { // can be fit in input string
            powers.add(powStr);
        } else {
            break;
        }
    }
    Collections.reverse(powers); // simple heuristics, sort powers in decreasing order
    // do simple recursive split
    split(inp, 0, -1);
    // print result
    if (bestSplit == Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
        System.out.println(-1);
    } else {
        System.out.println(bestSplit);
    }
}

public static void split(String inp, int start, int depth) {
    if (depth >= bestSplit) {
        return; // can't do better split
    }
    if (start == inp.length()) { // perfect split
        bestSplit = depth;
        return;
    }
    for (String pow : powers) {
        if (inp.startsWith(pow, start)) {
            split(inp, start + pow.length(), depth + 1);
        }
    }
}

EDIT:

I also found another approach which looks like very fast one.

  1. Calculate all powers of 5 whose string representation is shorter than input string. Save those strings in powers array.
  2. For every string power from powers array: if power is substring of input then save its start and end indexes into the edges array (array of tuples).
  3. Now we just need to find shortest path from index 0 to index input.length() by edges from the edges array. Every edge has the same weight, so the shortest path can be found very fast with BFS.
  4. The number of edges in the shortest path found is exactly what you need -- minimum number of splits of the input string.
3

Instead of calculating all possible substrings, you can check the binary representation of the powers of 5 in search of a common pattern. Using something like:

bc <<< "obase=2; for(i = 1; i < 40; i++) 5^i"

You get:

51 = 1012
52 = 110012
53 = 11111012
54 = 10011100012
55 = 1100001101012
56 = 111101000010012
57 = 100110001001011012
58 = 10111110101111000012
59 = 1110111001101011001012
510 = 1001010100000010111110012
511 = 101110100100001110110111012
512 = 11101000110101001010010100012
513 = 10010001100001001110011100101012
514 = 1011010111100110001000001111010012
515 = 111000110101111110101001001100011012
516 = 100011100001101111001001101111110000012
517 = 10110001101000101011110000101110110001012
518 = 1101111000001011011010110011101001110110012
...
529 = 101000011000111100000111110101110011011010111001000010111110010101012

As you can see, odd powers of 5 always ends with 101 and even powers of 5 ends with the pattern 10+1 (where + means one or more occurrences).

You could put your input string in a trie and then iterate over it identifying the 10+1 pattern, once you have a match, evaluate it to check if is not a false positive.

1

You just have to save the value for a given string in a map. For example having if you have a string ending like this: (each letter may be a string of arbitrary size)

ABCD

You find that part A mod 5 is ok, so you try again for BCD, but find that B mod 5 is also ok, same for C and D as well as CD together. Now you should have the following results cached:

C -> 0
D -> 0
CD -> 0
BCD -> 1  # split B/CD is the best

But you're not finished with ABCD - you find that AB mod 5 is ok, so you check the resulting CD - it's already in the cache and you don't have to process it from the beginning.

In practice you just need to cache answers from partition() - either for the actual string or for the (string, start, length) tuple. Which one is better depends on how many repeating sequences you have and whether it's faster to compare the contents, or just indexes.

  • I believe the solution I provided works top-down, but to cache the result, I've to adopt a bottom-up approach right? – codewarrior Aug 26 '15 at 3:30
  • I don't think it matters here - the problem is exactly the same whichever way you start. You can avoid deep recurrent call stack if you do bottom-up, which is good for performance. bottom-up is the classic dynamic programming, top-down is more of an opportunistic caching. Both should result in the same cache here. – viraptor Aug 26 '15 at 6:28
0

Given below is a solution in C++. Using dynamic programming I am considering all the possible splits and saving the best results.

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
typedef long long ll;
int isPowerOfFive(ll n)
{
    if(n == 0) return 0;
    ll temp = (ll)(log(n)/log(5));
    ll t = round(pow(5,temp));
    if(t == n)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }
}
ll solve(string s) 
{
    vector<ll> dp(s.length()+1);
    for(int i = 1; i <= s.length(); i++)
    {
        dp[i] = INT_MAX;
        for(int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
        {
            if( s[j-1] == '0')
            {
                continue;
            }
            ll num = stoll(s.substr(j-1, i-j+1), nullptr, 2);
            if(isPowerOfFive(num))
            {
                dp[i] = min(dp[i], dp[j-1]+1);
            }
        }
    }
    if(dp[s.length()] == INT_MAX)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    else
    {
        return dp[s.length()];
    }
}
int main()
{
    string s;
    cin>>s;
    cout<<solve(s);
}

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