9

OK, so, I wrote some code to check, how much memory is available at runtime. A whole (minimal) cpp file is below.

NOTE: The code is not perfect and not best practice, but I hope that you can focus on the memory management rather than the code.

What it does (part I):

  • (1) Allocate as much memory as possible in one block. Clear that memory
  • (2) Allocate as many medium sized blocks (16MB) as possible. Clear that memory.

--> This works fine

What it does (part II):

  • (1) Allocate as much memory as possible in one block. Clear that memory
  • (2) Allocate as many tiny blocks (16kb) as possible. Clear that memory.

--> This behaves weird!

The problem is: If I repeat that, I can only allocate 522kb for the secons run onward ---> ?

It does not happen, if the allocated blocks have e.g. 16MB of size.

Do you have any ideas, why this happens?

// AvailableMemoryTest.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"

#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <limits.h>
#include <iostream>


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{


    auto determineMaxAvailableMemoryBlock = []( void ) -> int
    {
        int nBytes = std::numeric_limits< int >::max();

        while ( true )
        {
            try
            {
                std::vector< char >vec( nBytes );
                break;
            }
            catch ( std::exception& ex )
            {
                nBytes = static_cast< int >( nBytes * 0.99 );
            }
        }
        return nBytes;
    };

    auto determineMaxAvailableMemoryFragmented = []( int nBlockSize ) -> int
    {

        int nBytes = 0;

        std::list< std::vector< char > > listBlocks;

        while ( true )
        {
            try
            {
                listBlocks.push_back( std::vector< char >( nBlockSize ) );
                nBytes += nBlockSize;
            }
            catch ( std::exception& ex )
            {
                break;
            }
        }
        return nBytes;
    };


    std::cout << "Test with large memory blocks (16MB):\n";
    for ( int k = 0; k < 5; k++ )
    {
        std::cout << "run #" << k << "   max  mem block          = " << determineMaxAvailableMemoryBlock() / 1024.0 / 1024.0 << "MB\n";
        std::cout << "run #" << k << "   frag mem blocks of 16MB = " << determineMaxAvailableMemoryFragmented( 16*1024*1024 ) / 1024.0 / 1024.0 << "MB\n";
        std::cout << "\n";
    } // for_k
    

    std::cout << "Test with small memory blocks (16k):\n";
    for ( int k = 0; k < 5; k++ )
    {
        std::cout << "run #" << k << "   max  mem block          = " << determineMaxAvailableMemoryBlock() / 1024.0 / 1024.0 << "MB\n";
        std::cout << "run #" << k << "   frag mem blocks of 16k  = " << determineMaxAvailableMemoryFragmented( 16*1024 ) / 1024.0 / 1024.0 << "MB\n";
        std::cout << "\n";
    } // for_k

    std::cin.get();


    return 0;
}

OUTPUT with large memory blocks (this works fine)

Test with large memory blocks (16MB):
run #0   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #0   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 1952MB        OK

run #1   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #1   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 1952MB        OK

run #2   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #2   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 1952MB        OK

run #3   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #3   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 1952MB        OK

run #4   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #4   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 1952MB        OK

OUTPUT with small memory blocks (memory allocation is weird from the second run onwards)

Test with small memory blocks (16k):
run #0   max  mem block          = 1023.67MB     OK
run #0   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 1991.06MB     OK

run #1   max  mem block          = 0.493021MB    ???
run #1   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 1991.34MB     OK

run #2   max  mem block          = 0.493021MB    ???
run #2   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 1991.33MB     OK

run #3   max  mem block          = 0.493021MB    ???
run #3   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 1991.33MB     OK

run #4   max  mem block          = 0.493021MB    ???
run #4   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 1991.33MB     OK

UPDATE:

This happels as well with new and delete[] instead of STL's internal memory allocation.

UPDATE:

It works for 64 bit (I limited the memory that both functions are allowed to allocate to 12GB). Really weird. Here is an image of that version's RAM usage:

RAM usage

UPDATE: It works with malloc and free, but not with new and delete[] (or STL as described above)

8
  • 1
    One possibility: heap managers tend to have various sections of the heap for different block sizes. It might be that that when you first fill everything with small blocks, one of the small block heap areas takes over everything, as is kept around for future allocations. Aug 26, 2015 at 14:15
  • OK, but why does it keep the memory instead of giving it the next allocation? It's not in use anymore...
    – S.H
    Aug 26, 2015 at 14:19
  • 1
    Why are you creating std::vector<char> instead of the more direct methods (new char[] or malloc)?
    – sfstewman
    Aug 26, 2015 at 14:20
  • 1
    @sfstewman: Why not? This is the simplest way, and it's functionally equivalent to your hacky, low-level, error-prone methods. For example, this approach avoids any worry that the allocated blocks may be leaked. The OP has done this right. Aug 26, 2015 at 14:21
  • 2
    This is most likely the result of fragmentation. Not all heap implementations manage fragmentation well. When you allocate small chunks and return them to the heap, they may not be coalesced, which effectively reduces usable memory. You may want to try using a different heap implementation like tcmalloc and see if you get different results.
    – Jason
    Aug 26, 2015 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

3

As I mentioned in the comment above, this is most likely a heap fragmentation issue. The heap will maintain lists of different sized chunks to satisfy different memory requests. Larger memory chunks are broken into smaller chunks for smaller memory requests to avoid wasting the difference between the chunk size and request size, which reduces the number of larger chunks. So, when a larger chunk is requested, the heap may not have enough large chunks to satisfy the request.

Fragmentation is a major issue with heap implementations since it effectively reduces usable memory. However, some heap implementations are able to coalesce smaller chunks back into larger chunks, and are better able to satisfy large requests even after a number of smaller requests.

I ran your above code, very slightly modified, using glibc's malloc (ptmalloc) and I got the following results...

Test with large memory blocks (16MB):
run #0   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #0   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 2032MB

run #1   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #1   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 2032MB

run #2   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #2   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 2032MB

run #3   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #3   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 2032MB

run #4   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #4   frag mem blocks of 16MB = 2032MB

Test with small memory blocks (16k):
run #0   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #0   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 2047.98MB

run #1   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #1   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 2047.98MB

run #2   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #2   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 2047.98MB

run #3   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #3   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 2047.98MB

run #4   max  mem block          = 2048MB
run #4   frag mem blocks of 16k  = 2047.98MB

So, ptmalloc at least seems to handle fragmentation well for this particular scenario.

4
  • Fragmentation means, if I allocate the blocks ABCDE, then delete ACE, we have xBxDx and I can't allocate a block larger than A, C or E. But what I'm doing is that I dele ALL blocks, So I should get the memory as xxxxx (completely empty) and reallocation should work!!!
    – S.H
    Aug 27, 2015 at 6:29
  • The problem is that the heaps don't necessarily know that ABCDE are contiguous. So, for example if ABCDE gets split into A, B, C, D, and E. If A gets returned and then B, the heap doesn't necessarily know B is the address after A (unless the heap is designed to like ptmalloc or tcmalloc. Can you try linking to tcmalloc? According to this thread, all you should need to do is link to tcmalloc before MSVCRT.
    – Jason
    Aug 27, 2015 at 7:24
  • "The problem is that the heaps don't necessarily know that ABCDE are contiguous." That would be a showstopper bug in a heap implementation, making it unusable for any real work. Aug 27, 2015 at 9:18
  • Not all heap implementations aggressively merge contiguous chunks or even merge contiguous chunks at all. The first, and only I know of, to use a radix tree to maintain spans is tcmalloc.
    – Jason
    Aug 27, 2015 at 13:54
1

I guess you're running 32bit code for some reason?

Best guess: your malloc implementation leaves bookkeeping data scattered everywhere in memory after freeing, when the allocations were small. Malloc implementations typically use different allocation strategies for small vs. large allocations, so it's not unreasonable that the bookkeeping info could be in different places.

On Unix, small allocations are usually done with brk, while large allocations are done with mmap(MAP_ANONYMOUS). _tmain and stdafx.h means you're testing on Windows, so IDK about how that malloc works under the hood.

8
  • Your first sentence is strange. You appear to imply that it's somehow unusual or bizarre to run 32-bit code. Can you explain that? Aug 26, 2015 at 14:23
  • 1
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Even current Atom CPUs support 64bit mode. x86-32 has been obsolete for years. The extra registers and register-call ABI are worth about 10 to 15% performance on typical code. If you're writing new code, it should be 64bit. If you're going to make a 32bit version at all, it's just for supporting users with really bad hardware. Aug 26, 2015 at 14:28
  • 2
    Good grief open your mind; we're not all programming brand new commodity hardware for the consumer market. Where do you think infrastructure comes from? Aug 26, 2015 at 14:29
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Sure, there are reasons for making 32bit binaries. IMO the "default" should be 64bit, though. Aug 26, 2015 at 14:30
  • I'll check the 64 bit version and I'll post the update... hoever... this really shouldn't matter. My system should be able to reallocate memory!
    – S.H
    Aug 26, 2015 at 14:36

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