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When I was reading Postgres documentation I easily found how to calculate cost for sequential scan but not a single word for calculation when using index, and non of the formulas I googled fit when I tried them.

Info about my settings: Table: 500 000 rows , 3786 realpages Unique index for one column(spz): 1374 realpages Other settings are default: (cpu_operator_cost=0.0025,cpu_tuple_cost=0.01,cpu_index_tuple_cost=0.005,random_page_cost=4,seq_page_cost=1)

I used two queries:

  1. select * from cars where spz <= X_number_of_rows (Index Scan using carsspz on cars) cost:cost_q1
  2. select spz from cars where spz <= X_number_of_rows (Index Only Scan using carsspz on cars) cost:cost_q2

Here are the costs I have recieved

Rows    cost_left cost_q1   cost_q2
1       0,42      4,44      4,44
2       0,42      8,44      4,44
3       0,42      8,46      4,46
4       0,42      8,47      4,48
5       0,42      8,49      4,49
6       0,42      8,51      4,51
7       0,42      8,53      4,53
8       0,42      8,54      4,55
9       0,42      8,56      4,56
10      0,42      8,58      4,58

100     0,42      10,1      6,1
200     0,42      12,8      7,8
500     0,42      23,88     16,88
1000    0,42      40,36     29,36

10 000  0,42      366,77    287,77
50 000  0,42      1768,84   1408,83
100 000 0,42      3580,9    2826,9

Can someone give my the calculation formula that would fit all the variants I shown in the table.

  • Use the source, Luke! (remember: Postgres is open source) – wildplasser Aug 26 '15 at 15:41
  • BTW: what is the cost_left (always 0,42) column? And the commaas are decimal separators? – wildplasser Aug 26 '15 at 16:18
  • yes comma is a decimal separator, the left column is so called "the start-up cost" , because in postgresql you have displayed two cost numbers left and right which is total cost (cost_q1 and cost_q2 in my table) – Baker Aug 27 '15 at 7:00
  • @wildplasser Ha. The planner code isn't the easiest to follow, with the cost estimation logic etc. – Craig Ringer Aug 27 '15 at 10:25
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The formula (or algorithm) is quite lengthy and I feel that I cannot reproduce it here, so this is going to be a link-only answer, sorry.

Luckily PG's source code is quite well structured and documented, so you can read about the whole algorithm there.

The planner lives in src/backend/optimizer and starts in planner.c, but let's skip directly to the cost estimation for an index scan, which is in costsize.c.

There we see that the cost depends on the type of index, so we need to go to the amcostestimate function of a btree index, which is called btcostestimate.

Here we find that this function tweaks the numbers depending on the index statistics, but the main cost comes from genericcostestimate.

You'll see that this takes for example caching effects into account, which explains why you are not seeing a linear relationship in your experiment.

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