63

I would like to know if there is a better way to conditionally pass a prop than using an if-statement.

For example, right now I have:

var parent = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    editable: React.PropTypes.bool.isRequired,
    editableOpts: React.PropTypes.shape({...})
  },
  render: function() {
    if(this.props.editable) {
      return (
        <Child editable={this.props.editableOpts} />
      );
    } else {
      // In this case, Child will use the editableOpts from its own getDefaultProps()
      return (
        <Child />
      );
    }
  }
});

Is there a way to write this without the if-statement? I am was thinking something along the lines of a type of inline-if-statement in the JSX:

var parent = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    editable: React.PropTypes.bool.isRequired,
    editableOpts: React.PropTypes.shape({...})
  },
  render: function() {
    return (
      <Child 
        {this.props.editable ? editable={this.props.editableOpts} : null} 
      />
    );
  }
});

To wrap-up: I'm trying to find a way to define a prop for Child, but pass a value (or do something else) such that Child still pulls that prop's value from Child's own getDefaultProps().

  • Can you include the code for Child as well? Also, did you mean to say <Child editableOpts={this.props.editableOpts} /> instead of <Child editable={this.props.editableOpts} />? – Jim Skerritt Aug 26 '15 at 17:21
  • @JimSkerritt I didn't confuse the props, though I know it looks that way. I'm trying to use react-bootstrap-table and that is the format that they use. I'm not sure the Child code actually matters for what I'm asking, which is why I didn't include it. I'm really just looking for a way to optionally pass or not pass a prop to Child that doesn't require having a massive amount of similar code in if-statements in the Parent. – Matthew Herbst Aug 26 '15 at 17:24
  • 1
    Gotcha, just checking :) I will have an answer for you shortly – Jim Skerritt Aug 26 '15 at 17:25
109

You were close with your idea. It turns out that passing undefined for a prop is the same as not including it at all, which will still trigger the default prop value. So you could do something like this:

var parent = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    editable: React.PropTypes.bool.isRequired,
    editableOpts: React.PropTypes.shape({...})
  },
  render: function() {
    return <Child 
      editable={this.props.editable ?
                  this.props.editableOpts : 
                  undefined}
    />;
  }
});
  • Oh, awesome! Did you find that in documentation somewhere? I was looking for that but couldn't find anything during a quick search – Matthew Herbst Aug 26 '15 at 17:37
  • not sure if it's in the documentation or not, just something I've learned while using React :) – Jim Skerritt Aug 26 '15 at 17:40
  • 5
    null is not armed with such power as undefined, BTW. – Season Aug 20 '16 at 10:46
  • 1
    useful trick! wish there were good resources on how to effectively use conditional rendering techniques – nicodjimenez Sep 22 '17 at 3:21
  • 1
    In the false case it doesn't work for me the way I wanted - I still get a key-value pair: property: null. Is it still possible to do it somehow with a single JSX element? – Gal Grünfeld Feb 11 '19 at 19:52
11

Define props variable:

let props = {};
if (this.props.editable){
  props.editable = this.props.editable;
}

And then use it in JSX:

<Child {...props} />

Here is a solution in your code:

var parent = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    editable: React.PropTypes.bool.isRequired,
    editableOpts: React.PropTypes.shape({...})
  },
  render: function() {
    let props = {};
    if (this.props.editable){
      props.editable = this.props.editable;
    }
    return (
      <Child {...props} />
    );
  }
});

Source, React documentation: https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/jsx-in-depth.html#spread-attributes

9

Add a spread operator to the this.props.editable:

<Child {...(this.props.editable ? {editable: {this.props.editableOpts}} : undefined)} >

should works.

  • 1
    Does this not yield the same result as editable= {this.props.editable ? this.props.editableOpts : undefined} Or is there a difference? – garyee Jun 26 '19 at 9:47
  • @garyee: the difference is that some components might incorrectly treat undefined as an override (like null, which is always an override) so the only way to keep the default value instead of setting it to a falsy value is to explicitly not pass it, not pass undefined. – Yann Dìnendal Sep 16 '19 at 13:53
3

Actually, if your prop is boolean it isn't needed to implement condition but if you wanna add prop by inline condition you should write like below:

const { editable, editableOpts } = this.props;
return (
  <Child {...(editable && { editable: editableOpts } )} />
);

Hope it doesn't confuse you. the {... means it is spread operator like passing existed props: {...props} and the editable && means if editable is true the { editable: editableOpts } object will make and with {... we will make a new object like it: {...{ editable: editableOpts }} that it means editable={editableOpts} but if this.porps.editable is true.

0
var parent = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    editable: React.PropTypes.bool.isRequired,
    editableOpts: React.PropTypes.shape({...})
  },
  render: function() {
    return (
      <Child 
        {...(this.props.editable && {editable=this.props.editableOpts})} 
      />
    );
  }
});

This passes the props if they are defined. Else the props are not passed. In the other answer's the props are still passed but the value is undefined which still means the props are being passed.

  • Passing undefined to a prop is equivalent to not passing it at all. – Matthew Herbst Oct 10 '19 at 17:39
  • Yes, I understand. I just wanted it to be clear! Thanks! – sanair96 Nov 15 '19 at 9:49

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