1

In my C++03 code, I have a lot of functions that look like this:

class A {
public:
    template <Iterator>
    void doSomethingWithObjects(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
        for (Iterator point = begin; point != end; point++) {
            mInternal.doSomething(*point);
        }
    }
private:
    DataStructure mInternal;
};

I'm trying to use C++11's features as much as possible in new code, in particular the range-based for loop. My question is, how would I do this with templated iterators? Is there a magic C++ structure that takes two templated iterator types, and turns them into a range expression? In other words, I'm looking for something like this:

class A {
public:
    template <Iterator>
    void doSomethingWithObjects(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
        static_assert(std::is_same<Point, typename std::decay<Iterator>::type>::value, "wrong type mate!"); // extra credit
        for (auto&& point : std::magic(begin, end)) {
            mInternal.doSomething(point);
        }
    }
private:
    DataStructure mInternal;
};

If there is a new, preferred ways to do this kind of "add a number of objects to this structure" in C++11, I'm all ears, too.

  • You mean this ? – Piotr Skotnicki Aug 26 '15 at 18:04
  • Yes, exactly! Is there a std structure that does exactly that? – bombax Aug 26 '15 at 18:05
  • 1
    No, to my best knowledge there is nothing like that in the standard library of both C++11 and C++14 – Piotr Skotnicki Aug 26 '15 at 18:05
5

There's nothing in the standard library. Boost has make_iterator_range, a simplified version of which is trivial to write:

template<class Iterator>
struct iter_range {
    Iterator begin_, end_;
    Iterator begin() const { return begin_; }
    Iterator end() const { return end_; }
};

template<class Iterator>
iter_range<Iterator> make_range(Iterator b, Iterator e) { return {b, e}; }

The original question just called push_back. For that, it doesn't need a loop. Just use the C++03 range overload of insert:

mInternal.insert(mInternal.end(), begin, end);
  • Edited to clarify that sometimes I do calculations and so on and not only insertion. – bombax Aug 26 '15 at 18:01
  • Thanks, I use boost, so this is probably my best bet! – bombax Aug 26 '15 at 18:10
2
template<class It>
struct range_t {
  It b; It e;
  It begin() const { return b; }
  It end() const { return e; }
};
template<class It>
range_t<It> range( It b, It e ) {
  return {std::forward<It>(b), std::forward<It>(e)};
}

then:

template <Iterator>
void doSomethingWithObjects(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
    for (auto&& point : range(begin, end)) {
        mInternal.doSomething(point);
    }
}

and bob is your uncle.

"Range-v3" is a library undergoing the standardization process that contains stuff like this already. Boost also has similar mechanisms.

But this kind of thing is simple enough to roll your own and forget about it. (Better versions include empty, conditionally support size and [], can be constructed from containers and C arrays and anything iterable, know if they are condiguous, conditionally store a copy of the incoming container for reference lifetime extension, etc: but you don't really need any of that).

  • Thanks, very helpful! – bombax Aug 26 '15 at 18:10
1

I would add a function overload and keep the existing function around to make the transition gradual and less disruptive.

template <typename Container>
void doSomethingWithObjects(Container&& c) {
    for (auto&& item: c) {
        mInternal.doSomething(item);
    }
}
  • Thanks, very helpful! The only problem is of course if you want to pass an array, which sometimes happens in my code. – bombax Aug 26 '15 at 18:13
  • @bombax, for that use case the use of the range_t object suggested by the other answers will come handy. – R Sahu Aug 26 '15 at 18:17
0

You don't actually need to turn them into anything. Just use the iterators with std::for_each:

template <Iterator>
void doSomethingWithObjects(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
    std::for_each(begin, end, [this](auto&& point){
        mInternal.doSomething(point);
    }

    // C++11 version
    std::for_each(begin, end, [this](decltype(*begin)& point) {
        mInternal.doSomething(point);
    }
}

or write the simple loop:

template <Iterator>
void doSomethingWithObjects(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
    for (; begin != end; ++begin) {
        mInternal.doSomething(*begin);
    }
}

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