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I have experience using angular and jquery. In jquery i have often used selector like this:

     <input name="name" class="cls">
     <input name="age" class="cls">

     $('.cls').change(function(){ });

My Question is how is this implemented by jquery. How does it know when the value of an input changes. When jquery encounters this selector, will it go to all the classes containing this and add onchange event to make html like this?

     <input name="name" class="cls" onchange="func_ref()">
     <input name="age" class="cls" onchange="func_ref()">

Knowing this will help me better optimize frontend javascript. Lately i learned that Angular is truly magic but comes at the cost of performance.

  • It does not change the HTML itself, rather it has jQuery's version of onchange event handler to each element with that class in JavaScript. But it does not add the onchange attribute to them. – Spencer Wieczorek Aug 27 '15 at 2:10
  • jQuery file can be downloaded and opens with any code editor. It's JavaScript code, and the implementations can be seen inside – cosmycx Aug 27 '15 at 2:25
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When jquery encounters this selector, will it go to all the classes containing this and add onchange event to make html like this?

Yes change event attached to all elements having selector class ; though onchange="func_ref()" not inserted into html . Inside handler func_ref this references DOM element where change event occurred.

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Yes, $('.cls').change(function() { /* ... */ }) will get all of the elements that currently have the class cls applied and attach an event listener to them, although it does it through addEventListener, rather than by adding an attribute.

If you have lots of elements, there’s sometimes a way you can avoid attaching large numbers of event listeners. Namely, due to event bubbling, for certain events you can add an event listener to a common parent element, and the browser takes care of bubbling the event up from the actual originating element. jQuery offers a handy way of utilizing this mechanism while still being selective in what originating elements you care about, like this:

$('#container').on('change', '.cls', function() { /* ... */ });

…which actually attaches a listener to #container, but will act as if you added a listener to all elements matching .cls.

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