1

I'm trying to match repeated patterns in strings. I know i can use /^[0-9]{5}$/ at least in perl, but this doesn't seem to work in awk or nawk (no gawk installed).

Any alternative, other than /^[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]$/ ?

EDIT:

echo "AAB" > test

script.awk:

#!/usr/bin/nawk -f
BEGIN {}
/^A\{2,2\}/ { print "1"; }
/^A/ { print "2"; }
/A\{2,2\}/ { print "3"; }
/A{2,2}/ { print "4"; }
END {}

./script.awk test

only output (awk or nauk):

2
  • escape { and } using a backslash -> /^[0-9]\{5\}$/. This works for me with awk 4.1.1 – bro Aug 27 '15 at 8:41
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    What system are you using? The first syntax should be supported by nawk. – Tom Fenech Aug 27 '15 at 8:44
  • SunOS 5.10/Solaris 10, escaping { doesn't to it. – vesperto Aug 27 '15 at 10:00
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    You can't use curly brackets without GNU awk, you also need to use re-interval with pre 4 releases. Look here staff.science.uu.nl/~oostr102/docs/nawk/nawk_46.html – 123 Aug 27 '15 at 10:07
  • Thanks User112638726, that's what i was half-expecting. Answer it :) – vesperto Aug 27 '15 at 10:32
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The default awk on Solaris is old, broken awk which should never be used by anyone for any reason. nawk is much better than /usr/bin/awk but is still a very old, non-POSIX awk, and so does not support RE intervals. Almost any other awk will work. On Solaris if you don't have and can't install GNU awk then use /usr/xpg4/bin/awk as it's very close to POSIX compliant and does support RE intervals.

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