165

Background:

I have a module which declares a number of instance methods

module UsefulThings
  def get_file; ...
  def delete_file; ...

  def format_text(x); ...
end

And I want to call some of these methods from within a class. How you normally do this in ruby is like this:

class UsefulWorker
  include UsefulThings

  def do_work
    format_text("abc")
    ...
  end
end

Problem

include UsefulThings brings in all of the methods from UsefulThings. In this case I only want format_text and explicitly do not want get_file and delete_file.

I can see several possible solutions to this:

  1. Somehow invoke the method directly on the module without including it anywhere
    • I don't know how/if this can be done. (Hence this question)
  2. Somehow include Usefulthings and only bring in some of it's methods
    • I also don't know how/if this can be done
  3. Create a proxy class, include UsefulThings in that, then delegate format_text to that proxy instance
    • This would work, but anonymous proxy classes are a hack. Yuck.
  4. Split up the module into 2 or more smaller modules
    • This would also work, and is probably the best solution I can think of, but I'd prefer to avoid it as I'd end up with a proliferation of dozens and dozens of modules - managing this would be burdensome

Why are there lots of unrelated functions in a single module? It's ApplicationHelper from a rails app, which our team has de-facto decided on as the dumping ground for anything not specific enough to belong anywhere else. Mostly standalone utility methods that get used everywhere. I could break it up into seperate helpers, but there'd be 30 of them, all with 1 method each... this seems unproductive

  • If you take the 4th approach (splitting up the module), you could make it so that one module always automatically includes the other by using the Module#included callback to trigger an include of the other. The format_text method could be moved into it's own module, since it seems to be useful on it's own. This would make management a little less burdensome. – Batkins Jan 31 '13 at 17:19
  • I'm perplexed by all the references in the answers to module functions. Suppose you have module UT; def add1; self+1; end; def add2; self+2; end; end and you want to use add1 but not add2 in class Fixnum. How would it help to have module functions for that? Am I missing something? – Cary Swoveland Aug 13 '15 at 4:24
128

If a method on a module is turned into a module function you can simply call it off of Mods as if it had been declared as

module Mods
  def self.foo
     puts "Mods.foo(self)"
  end
end

The module_function approach below will avoid breaking any classes which include all of Mods.

module Mods
  def foo
    puts "Mods.foo"
  end
end

class Includer
  include Mods
end

Includer.new.foo

Mods.module_eval do
  module_function(:foo)
  public :foo
end

Includer.new.foo # this would break without public :foo above

class Thing
  def bar
    Mods.foo
  end
end

Thing.new.bar  

However, I'm curious why a set of unrelated functions are all contained within the same module in the first place?

Edited to show that includes still work if public :foo is called after module_function :foo

  • 1
    As an aside, module_function turns the method into a private one, which would break other code - otherwise this'd be the accepted answer – Orion Edwards Nov 27 '08 at 0:17
  • I ended up doing the decent thing and refactoring my code into seperate modules. It wasn't as bad as I thought it might be. Your answer is would still solve it most correctly WRT my original constraints, so accepted! – Orion Edwards Nov 27 '08 at 20:18
  • @dgtized related functions may end up in one module all the time, that doesn't mean that I want to pollute my namespace with all of them. A simple example if there's a Files.truncate and a Strings.truncate and I want to use both in the same class, explicitly. Creating a new class/instance each time I need a specific method or modifying the original is not a nice approach, though I'm not a Ruby dev. – TWiStErRob Jul 5 '16 at 23:19
131

I think the shortest way to do just throw-away single call (without altering existing modules or creating new ones) would be as follows:

Class.new.extend(UsefulThings).get_file
  • 1
    Very usefull for files erb. html.erb, or js.erb. thanks ! I wonder if this system wastes memory – Albert Català May 18 '15 at 14:02
  • 3
    @AlbertCatalà according to my tests and stackoverflow.com/a/23645285/54247 the anonymous classes are garbage collected just as everything else, so it shouldn't waste memory. – dolzenko May 18 '15 at 14:43
  • 1
    If you don't like to make an anonymous class as proxy you could also use an object as proxy for the method. Object.new.extend(UsefulThings).get_file – 3limin4t0r Sep 10 '18 at 18:51
78

Another way to do it if you "own" the module is to use module_function.

module UsefulThings
  def a
    puts "aaay"
  end
  module_function :a

  def b
    puts "beee"
  end
end

def test
  UsefulThings.a
  UsefulThings.b # Fails!  Not a module method
end

test
  • 24
    And for the case where you don't own it: UsefulThings.send :module_function, :b – Dustin Nov 26 '08 at 23:24
  • 3
    module_function converts the method to a private one (well it does in my IRB anyway), which would break other callers :-( – Orion Edwards Nov 27 '08 at 0:19
  • I actually like this approach, for my purposes at least. Now I can call ModuleName.method :method_name to get a method object and call it via method_obj.call. Otherwise I would have to bind the method to an instance of the original object, which isn't possible if the original object is a Module. In response to Orion Edwards, module_function does make the original instance method private. ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Module.html#M001642 – John Oct 18 '10 at 21:41
  • 2
    Orion - I don't believe that's true. According to ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/…, module_function "creates module functions for the named methods. These functions may be called with the module as a receiver, and also become available as instance methods to classes that mix in the module. Module functions are copies of the original, and so may be changed independently. The instance-method versions are made private. If used with no arguments, subsequently defined methods become module functions." – BoosterStage Apr 4 '11 at 19:05
  • 2
    you could also define it as def self.a; puts 'aaay'; end – Tilo Jan 28 '18 at 22:34
17

If you want to call these methods without including module in another class then you need to define them as module methods:

module UsefulThings
  def self.get_file; ...
  def self.delete_file; ...

  def self.format_text(x); ...
end

and then you can call them with

UsefulThings.format_text("xxx")

or

UsefulThings::format_text("xxx")

But anyway I would recommend that you put just related methods in one module or in one class. If you have problem that you want to include just one method from module then it sounds like a bad code smell and it is not good Ruby style to put unrelated methods together.

17

To invoke a module instance method without including the module (and without creating intermediary objects):

class UsefulWorker
  def do_work
    UsefulThings.instance_method(:format_text).bind(self).call("abc")
    ...
  end
end
  • 2
    It's ugly, but it works. You gotta love Ruby :) – Josh Aug 18 '15 at 7:26
  • Be careful with this approach: binding to self may not provide the method with everything it expects. For example, perhaps format_text assumes the existence of another method provided by the module, which (generally) won't be present. – Nathan Sep 26 '16 at 18:32
  • This is the way , can load any module , no matter if module support method can be load directly. Even it is better to change in Module level. But in some cases, This line is What askers want to get. – twindai Apr 5 '17 at 13:33
5

Firstly, I'd recommend breaking the module up into the useful things you need. But you can always create a class extending that for your invocation:

module UsefulThings
  def a
    puts "aaay"
  end
  def b
    puts "beee"
  end
end

def test
  ob = Class.new.send(:include, UsefulThings).new
  ob.a
end

test
4

A. In case you, always want to call them in a "qualified", standalone way (UsefulThings.get_file), then just make them static as others pointed out,

module UsefulThings
  def self.get_file; ...
  def self.delete_file; ...

  def self.format_text(x); ...

  # Or.. make all of the "static"
  class << self
     def write_file; ...
     def commit_file; ...
  end

end

B. If you still want to keep the mixin approach in same cases, as well the one-off standalone invocation, you can have a one-liner module that extends itself with the mixin:

module UsefulThingsMixin
  def get_file; ...
  def delete_file; ...

  def format_text(x); ...
end

module UsefulThings
  extend UsefulThingsMixin
end

So both works then:

  UsefulThings.get_file()       # one off

   class MyUser
      include UsefulThingsMixin  
      def f
         format_text             # all useful things available directly
      end
   end 

IMHO it's cleaner than module_function for every single method - in case want all of them.

  • extend self is a common idiom. – smathy May 10 '18 at 17:34
4

As I understand the question, you want to mix some of a module's instance methods into a class.

Let's begin by considering how Module#include works. Suppose we have a module UsefulThings that contains two instance methods:

module UsefulThings
  def add1
    self + 1
  end
  def add3
    self + 3
  end
end

UsefulThings.instance_methods
  #=> [:add1, :add3]

and Fixnum includes that module:

class Fixnum
  def add2
    puts "cat"
  end
  def add3
    puts "dog"
  end
  include UsefulThings
end

We see that:

Fixnum.instance_methods.select { |m| m.to_s.start_with? "add" }
  #=> [:add2, :add3, :add1] 
1.add1
2 
1.add2
cat
1.add3
dog

Were you expecting UsefulThings#add3 to override Fixnum#add3, so that 1.add3 would return 4? Consider this:

Fixnum.ancestors
  #=> [Fixnum, UsefulThings, Integer, Numeric, Comparable,
  #    Object, Kernel, BasicObject] 

When the class includes the module, the module becomes the class' superclass. So, because of how inheritance works, sending add3 to an instance of Fixnum will cause Fixnum#add3 to be invoked, returning dog.

Now let's add a method :add2 to UsefulThings:

module UsefulThings
  def add1
    self + 1
  end
  def add2
    self + 2
  end
  def add3
    self + 3
  end
end

We now wish Fixnum to include only the methods add1 and add3. Is so doing, we expect to get the same results as above.

Suppose, as above, we execute:

class Fixnum
  def add2
    puts "cat"
  end
  def add3
    puts "dog"
  end
  include UsefulThings
end

What is the result? The unwanted method :add2 is added to Fixnum, :add1 is added and, for reasons I explained above, :add3 is not added. So all we have to do is undef :add2. We can do that with a simple helper method:

module Helpers
  def self.include_some(mod, klass, *args)
    klass.send(:include, mod)
    (mod.instance_methods - args - klass.instance_methods).each do |m|
      klass.send(:undef_method, m)
    end
  end
end

which we invoke like this:

class Fixnum
  def add2
    puts "cat"
  end
  def add3
    puts "dog"
  end
  Helpers.include_some(UsefulThings, self, :add1, :add3)
end

Then:

Fixnum.instance_methods.select { |m| m.to_s.start_with? "add" }
  #=> [:add2, :add3, :add1] 
1.add1
2 
1.add2
cat
1.add3
dog

which is the result we want.

0

After almost 9 years here's a generic solution:

module CreateModuleFunctions
  def self.included(base)
    base.instance_methods.each do |method|
      base.module_eval do
        module_function(method)
        public(method)
      end
    end
  end
end

RSpec.describe CreateModuleFunctions do
  context "when included into a Module" do
    it "makes the Module's methods invokable via the Module" do
      module ModuleIncluded
        def instance_method_1;end
        def instance_method_2;end

        include CreateModuleFunctions
      end

      expect { ModuleIncluded.instance_method_1 }.to_not raise_error
    end
  end
end

The unfortunate trick you need to apply is to include the module after the methods have been defined. Alternatively you may also include it after the context is defined as ModuleIncluded.send(:include, CreateModuleFunctions).

Or you can use it via the reflection_utils gem.

spec.add_dependency "reflection_utils", ">= 0.3.0"

require 'reflection_utils'
include ReflectionUtils::CreateModuleFunctions
  • Well, your approach like the majority of responses we can see here don't address the original problem and load all the methods. The only good answer is to unbind the method from the original module and bind it in the targeted class, as @renier already responds 3 years ago. – Joel AZEMAR Sep 20 '18 at 12:30
  • @JoelAZEMAR I think you're misunderstanding this solution. It is to be added to the module you want to use. As a result none of its methods will have to be included in order to use them. As suggested by OP as one of possible solutions: "1, Somehow invoke the method directly on the module without including it anywhere". This is how it works. – thisismydesign Sep 21 '18 at 12:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.