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I want to work with another programmer on a project using git on bitbucket. Since I am not the owner of the project, I did the following steps:

  1. I forked the project (I have of on my repo now)
  2. I made my changes and commited them
  3. I pushed to my repo
  4. I made a pull request

The owner of the project accepted my pull request and all the changes are now in his repo.

Now, I want to make a new pull request of the modified version of the project owner. Should I make a new fork of the same repo?


The forumulation of the problem with some codes:

  1. I forked the project (I have a copy on my repo now)

    • owner/proj: the repo of the owner
    • me/proj: my fork of the owner/proj
  2. I made my changes and commited them

    git add .

    git commit -m "fork-commit"

  3. I pushed to my repo

    git push -u origin # the push was done into my repo: me/proj

  4. I made a pull request & it is accepted by the owner (the master branch of me/proj and owner/proj are identical)

  5. After that the owner did some extra changes to his master branch of owner/proj, the repos situation is as follows:

    • the master branch of me/proj is exactly the same of the master branch of my local repo. Consequently, the command git fetch and git pull will do nothing (that's normal)
    • the master branch of me/proj and the master branch of owner/proj are different.

SO TO AVOID MULTIPLE FORK, should I make a git pull on the owner repo? Or should we (me and the owner) share the same repo?

Thanks,

  • 2
    No. You should pull the changes of the official repo in your working copy, then push them to your bitbucket repo (to be up-to-date), and then implement your change and submit a PR as you did with the first one. – JB Nizet Aug 27 '15 at 17:32
  • I updated my question in order to make it clearer. Please @JBNizet, let me know what you think? Thanks... – Amine Jallouli Aug 27 '15 at 19:10
  • Do you not have write access to the repository itself? The normal workflow would be clone the repository, do your work in another branch, push that branch, create a pull request asking for the changes in your branch to be merged into the master/production branch. – Martin Bean Aug 27 '15 at 19:23
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SO TO AVOID MULTIPLE FORK, should I make a git pull on the owner repo? Or should we (me and the owner) share the same repo?

No need for multiple forks, just make a git pull from the owner repo.

Always use pull requests for untrusted contributors. If it's ok with the owner, you should try different workflows and find one that both of you are comfortable with.

0

It depends on the repository owner how he wants to merge your code.

As a option, after code merge of a pull request, you can create a new branch of the merged code to get all your and your owner's changes and start working on that repo. After completing your work you can push the code in your branch and then create the pull request.

In case your owner does any change in the base repo before you create pull request and you need that code in your branch, you can merge base branch into your feature branch using following commands -

git checkout "your feature branch"

git pull

git merge "your owner's branch"

(Provide your commit comment)

git push 
  • I updated my question in order to make it clearer. Thank you for updating your answer... – Amine Jallouli Aug 27 '15 at 19:11
  • As you said, git pull will not do anything. It will show everything is up to date. In this case you just need to run the commands what I mentioned after git pull. – Abhishek Aug 28 '15 at 3:00
  • git merge "your owner's branch" and after providing your comment you just need to do git push. You will have your owner's branch code in your branch and in your local machine as well. – Abhishek Aug 28 '15 at 3:02

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