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I can find first position of string "ATG" in myString "ATGGACGTGAGCTGATCGATGGCTGAAATGAAAA" (i.e. index range is 0..<3) by using code below. Question is how to find all positions of "ATG", not only the first one in the myString.

let stringRange = myString.rangeOfString("ATG")
2

Welcome to SO.

This would be a good programming exercise. I suggest that you take it on as a learning project.

Write a function that takes a string to search in, and a string to search for, and returns an optional array of NSRange objects. If it doesn't find any occurrences, the optional would be nil. Alternately, you could always return an array, but have it contain 0 NSRange objects if the string isn't found.

Have your function use the NSString method rangeOfString:options:range: to search the string. First you would search the entire source string. Once you found the first occurrence, you'd adjust the range parameter to only search the remainder of the source string after that occurrence.

EDIT:

An elegant way to do this would be as an extension to the String class. That way you could use your new method as if it was a built-in feature of Strings.

  • 23
    This is not an answer to the question. – Sean Vikoren Aug 29 '16 at 21:28
  • 1
    @SeanVikoren, I disagree. I provided an outline of a solution. I did, in fact, explain how to do it. I think the OP would learn more from implementing the solution himself than if he's given the complete solution. – Duncan C Nov 22 '16 at 12:32
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    It's really all about answering the question as directly as possible. See: stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer – Sean Vikoren Dec 13 '16 at 20:45
  • @SeanVikoren, To quote from that link: "Any answer that gets the asker going in the right direction is helpful, but do try to mention any limitations, assumptions or simplifications in your answer. Brevity is acceptable, but fuller explanations are better." I outlined an approach, in some detail, and included information the functions to use in the solution. I did not provide code, because I think that leads to copy-paste programming rather than learning, both for the OP and others who come along later. It's a "give a man a fish/teach a man to fish" thing. – Duncan C Feb 10 '17 at 18:45
  • @SeanVikoren, you say "It's really all about answering the question as directly as possible." Respectfully, I disagree, and disagree strongly. Providing drop-in code is often counterproductive to learning. It leads to "Stack Overflow Warrior" copy-paste programming, where somebody surfs the net, finds code, and cobbles together a program without really understanding the code they are using. – Duncan C Apr 17 '17 at 21:43
13

You can use NSRegularExpression to find all occurrences of your string:

Swift 1.2:

let mystr = "ATGGACGTGAGCTGATCGATGGCTGAAATGAAAA"
let searchstr = "ATG"
let ranges: [NSRange]

// Create the regular expression.
if let regex = NSRegularExpression(pattern: searchstr, options: nil, error: nil) {
    // Use the regular expression to get an array of NSTextCheckingResult.
    // Use map to extract the range from each result.
    ranges = regex.matchesInString(mystr, options: nil, range: NSMakeRange(0, count(mystr))).map {$0.range}

} else {
    // There was a problem creating the regular expression
    ranges = []
}

println(ranges)  // prints [(0,3), (18,3), (27,3)]

Swift 2:

let mystr = "ATGGACGTGAGCTGATCGATGGCTGAAATGAAAA"
let searchstr = "ATG"
let ranges: [NSRange]

do {
    // Create the regular expression.
    let regex = try NSRegularExpression(pattern: searchstr, options: [])

    // Use the regular expression to get an array of NSTextCheckingResult.
    // Use map to extract the range from each result.
    ranges = regex.matchesInString(mystr, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, mystr.characters.count)).map {$0.range}
}
catch {
    // There was a problem creating the regular expression
    ranges = []
}

print(ranges)  // prints [(0,3), (18,3), (27,3)]

Swift 3: using Swift's native Range type.

let mystr = "ATGGACGTGAGCTGATCGATGGCTGAAATGAAAA"
let searchstr = "ATG"

do {
    // Create the regular expression.
    let regex = try NSRegularExpression(pattern: searchstr, options: [])

    // Use the regular expression to get an array of NSTextCheckingResult.
    // Use map to extract the range from each result.
    let fullStringRange = mystr.nsRange(from: mystr.startIndex ..< mystr.endIndex)          
    let matches = regex.matches(in: mystr, options: [], range: fullStringRange)
    let ranges = matches.map {$0.range}
    print(ranges)  // prints [(0,3), (18,3), (27,3)]
}
catch {}

Notes:

  • This method has its limitations. You'll be fine if the string you are searching for is simple text, but if the string contains symbols (such as "+*()[].{}?\^$") which have special meaning in a regular expression, then this will not work as expected. You could preprocess the search string to add escapes to nullify the special meanings of those characters, but this is probably more trouble than it is worth.
  • Another limitation can be demonstrated when mystr is "AAAA" and searchstr is "AA". In this case, the string will only be found twice. The middle AA will not be found because it starts with a character that is part of the first range.
  • That's a nice clean use of NSRegularExpression (voted). However, isn't the scope of the ranges variable limited to the braces of the if let (Swift 1.2) or the do (Swift 2) and not accessible outside? To make this useful, I would think you'd need to make ranges a array of type [NSRange]? and define it at the outer level of scope. – Duncan C Aug 29 '15 at 14:15
  • Why not edit your answer to reflect the changes? That would be more helpful both to the OP and future readers of this thread. Another nit: In your third bullet, you suggest adding var ranges = [NSRange](). That allocates a new, empty array of NSRange objects, which then gets replaced by the array returned by the call to matchesInString. There is no point in creating an empty range that gets replaced. Better to use var ranges = [NSRange]! Make it an implicitly unwrapped optional, but don't create an empty array. It saves a throw-away object creation. – Duncan C Aug 29 '15 at 15:50
  • Well, you have to deal with the error case somehow. You can just use the ranges when you know they're good (my original version), you can give ranges a default value (my second version), you can use an optional and check it, or you can assign a value to ranges in the error case (my latest version). – vacawama Aug 29 '15 at 16:28
  • This works in a language that doesn't use diacritics, in Hebrew for example with all the diacritics, if you try to find something towards the end of a long paragraph, it won't find it, so its better to use mystr.unicodeScalars.count to count the individual unicode characters not only the glyphs – sharshi Feb 19 '16 at 20:11
5
extension String {
    public func rangesOfString(searchString:String, options: NSStringCompareOptions = [], searchRange:Range<Index>? = nil ) -> [Range<Index>] {
        if let range = rangeOfString(searchString, options: options, range:searchRange) {

            let nextRange = Range(start:range.endIndex, end:self.endIndex)
            return [range] + rangesOfString(searchString, searchRange: nextRange)
        } else {
            return []
        }
    }
}
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    To make this count the correct number of "aa" in "aaaa", change the next range line to: let nextRange = range.startIndex.advancedBy(1)..<self.endIndex – Sean Vikoren Aug 29 '16 at 22:29
1

That makes sense, because according to the docs, rangeOfString:

Finds and returns the range of the first occurrence of a given string within the receiver.

If you'd like to find all the occurrences, you could loop until rangeOfString: returns nil, and each time—trim the string up to just after the matched range. You'd have to keep track of your position within the original string and transpose the indexes, of course.

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    Trimming the string is inefficient. (It creates a series of new string objects as it runs.) Better to use the version of rangeOfString that takes a search range, as outlined in my answer. – Duncan C Aug 29 '15 at 11:33
  • @DuncanC Ah, but of course. Thank you kind sir! – pxlshpr Aug 29 '15 at 11:35

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