4

Consider the following controller action, of which plenty examples exist around the web:

public ActionResult Fail()
{
    return new HttpStatusCodeResult(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, "My helpful message");
}

Now, we'll call that action via Ajax and display the results in the page;

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
        <title></title>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();

            xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function () {
                if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4) {
                    document.body.innerHTML = xmlhttp.response;
                }
            }

            xmlhttp.open("POST", "/log/fail", true);
            xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
            xmlhttp.send();

        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
    </body>
</html>

When I open that page in say Chrome or Firefox on my Windows 10 device, I get a full error report with My helpful message displayed prominently.

However, when I open this page on an iOS device (tested with iPad Air, iPhone 5S), the message is nowhere in the received response.

This leads me to believe that you can't depend on HttpStatusCodeResult.StatusDescription to be returned to the client and rather than detecting an application issue and responding with a new HttpStatusCodeResult(), instead, models sent back to the front end should be extended to include any application-specific error messages and sent back normally (HttpStatusCode.OK). Is this the case?

Note that this extends to AngularJs where I originally found it, and jQuery as well;

AngularJS

$http.post('/log/fail')
    .then(function (response) {
        // successful
    }, function (response) {
        document.body.innerHTML = response.statusText; // 'Bad Request' in iOS
    });

jQuery

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
        <title></title>
        <script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.1.4.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $.ajax({ url: '/log/fail', method:'POST' }).error(function (response) {
                document.body.innerHTML = response.statusText; // 'Bad request' in iOS
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
    </body>
</html>
1

You can rely on the status code result to be returned from the server (at least on IIS).

However, there are no guarantees that the browser will have support for it.

But you are right in your assertion that you should use the model to return any errors to display on the client to get consistent results.

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