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I have learned PHP and now I'm learning Python. I have written this code in both languages, but its behaviour differs.

PHP:

<?php
        $x = [];
        $y = $x;
        $x['key'] = 'value';
        var_dump($x);
        var_dump($y);

Python:

    x = {}
    y = x
    x['key'] = 'value'
    print(x)
    print(y)

y is null in PHP , but not in Python.

I want to know why..

  • 1
    Understanding how the assignment works is VERY important in python. On top of value/reference, it also substitutes/affects variable declaration/scope/type. Please take time now to study and avoid being bitten later – Pynchia Aug 30 '15 at 4:27
  • tldr; arrays in PHP are cloned/duplicated on assignment (it's actually more complex than this, and the copy is cleverly deferred, but there are effectively two arrays after the assignment). In Python no object is cloned/duplicated on assignment, including dictionaries/lists, so there is still one dictionary .. with two different names. This also explains behavior differences when passing arrays in PHP and lists in Python. PHP object assignment works like it does in Python. – user2864740 Aug 30 '15 at 5:33
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In PHP, when you’re assigning $y = $x, it copies the array. In Python, dictionaries are objects, and you merely copy the reference—not the dictionary itself. If you want to copy the dictionary, there’s a method for that:

x = {}
y = x.copy()
x['key'] = 'value'
print(x)
print(y)
  • Thanks , It's very helpful.. – LiamHsia Aug 30 '15 at 5:13
  • Not exactly true about php. PHP is copy-on-write not copy-on-assignment. – Josh J Aug 31 '15 at 12:42
  • @Josh: That’s an implementation detail if anything. – icktoofay Sep 1 '15 at 3:16
  • It is an implementation detail that is relevant to the original question. Python points names to variable locations. php increments the refcount of a zval. If the zval is an object then both variables point to the same object. If the zval is a scalar then any write op would cause the zval to copy and the refcount of the original zval would be decremented. – Josh J Sep 1 '15 at 13:17
  • @Josh: But functionally, to the user of the language, it acts as if it were a copy, no? If so, that’s an interesting technical detail, but is not necessary for understanding the difference between PHP and Python’s semantics in this regard. – icktoofay Sep 2 '15 at 0:41
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Some people says python doesn't have variables, python has names. And names assigns to a value, rather than values assigned to a variable.

for example,

    x =23

enter image description here

Now do what you did before:

    x = 23
    y = x

enter image description here

As you can see, no two values are created, rather two names are pointed to same value 23.

So, i think you are now understand the situation. both are pointing to same value.

So, in your example, both are pointing to same dictionary. What happens if one name change the dictionary. Other names will have that change because they were pointing to the same dictionary. Hope it clears.

  • While this contains truthful information the introduction conclusion is misleading; object assignment works the same way in PHP as it does in Python. It is the assignment and passing of arrays in PHP that is different as it has clone/copy semantics. – user2864740 Aug 30 '15 at 22:45
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    Also, while assignment of immutable primitive values - eg. 'integers' - are implemented differently they are semantically equivalent in practice. This makes integers especially poor examples to try and illustrate the behavior; a dictionary/list would have been a much better target and more closely match the question. – user2864740 Aug 30 '15 at 22:46

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