5

I want to create a sin cos look up table for optimization, by using an array index from 0 to UCHAR_MAX, so that 0 radian is index 0, pi/2 radian is UCHAR_MAX/4:

sincos.h

#include <limits.h>
#include <math.h>
int sini[UCHAR_MAX];
int cosi[UCHAR_MAX];
#define MAGNIFICATION 256
#define SIN(i) sini[i]/MAGNIFICATION
#define COS(i) cosi[i]/MAGNIFICATION

void initTable(){
    for(int i=0;i<UCHAR_MAX;i++){
        sini[i]=sinf(i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX)*MAGNIFICATION;
        cosi[i]=cosf(i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX)*MAGNIFICATION;
    }
}

the reason of using UCHAR_MAX as max is I want to make the good use of unsigned char overflow to simulates the radian thats varies from 0 to 2*pi only : for example, if the value of radian is 2*pi, the index of array becomes UCHAR_MAX, because it overflows, it automatically becomes 0 and no mod is required (if I use 0 to 360 as domain I may need to calculate index%360 every time). Then I test it with some radian values:

float rad[]={2.0f,4.0f,6.0f,8.0f,10.0f,-2.0f,-4.0f,-6.0f,-8.0f,-10.0f};

like the following:

#include "sincos.h"
#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    initTable();
    unsigned char radToIndex;
    float rad[]={2.0f,4.0f,6.0f,8.0f,10.0f,-2.0f,-4.0f,-6.0f,-8.0f,-10.0f};
    int scalar=123;
    printf("scalar=%d\n",scalar);
    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(rad)/sizeof(float);i++){
        radToIndex=rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI;
        printf("%d*sin(%f) : %f , %d\n",scalar,rad[i],scalar*sinf(rad[i]),scalar*SIN(radToIndex));
    }
    return 0;
}

I test the table with 123*sin(radian),found the results starts go beyond the actual one when the magnitude of radian increases (when radian is 10 or -10):

scalar=123
123*sin(2.000000) : 111.843582 , 111
123*sin(4.000000) : -93.086708 , -92
123*sin(6.000000) : -34.368107 , -35
123*sin(8.000000) : 121.691063 , 122
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -61
123*sin(-2.000000) : -111.843582 , -112
123*sin(-4.000000) : 93.086708 , 90
123*sin(-6.000000) : 34.368107 , 38
123*sin(-8.000000) : -121.691063 , -122
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 59

and test with another data:

float rad[]={0.01f,0.1f,1.0f,10.0f,100.0f,1000.0f,-0.01f,-0.1f,-1.0f,-10.0f,-100.0f,-1000.0f};

output:

scalar=123
123*sin(0.010000) : 1.229980 , 0
123*sin(0.100000) : 12.279510 , 12
123*sin(1.000000) : 103.500931 , 102
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -61
123*sin(100.000000) : -62.282974 , -97
123*sin(1000.000000) : 101.706184 , -25
123*sin(-0.010000) : -1.229980 , 0
123*sin(-0.100000) : -12.279510 , -8
123*sin(-1.000000) : -103.500931 , -100
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 59
123*sin(-100.000000) : 62.282974 , 98
123*sin(-1000.000000) : -101.706184 , 22

The error increase when magnitude increases, so I am quite sure the table becomes inaccurate when radian is large. In sincos.h there is a value MAGNIFICATION to control the accuracy, I changed it from 256 to 4096, but it seems no much improvement:

scalar=123
123*sin(0.010000) : 1.229980 , 0
123*sin(0.100000) : 12.279510 , 12
123*sin(1.000000) : 103.500931 , 102
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -62
123*sin(100.000000) : -62.282974 , -97
123*sin(1000.000000) : 101.706184 , -25
123*sin(-0.010000) : -1.229980 , 0
123*sin(-0.100000) : -12.279510 , -9
123*sin(-1.000000) : -103.500931 , -100
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 59
123*sin(-100.000000) : 62.282974 , 99
123*sin(-1000.000000) : -101.706184 , 22

why would that happen? is there logical error of the table?

  • How to you messure the accuracy? – Iman Aug 31 '15 at 4:56
5
0

[Edit]

Code experiences problems as the angle increases past 360 degrees due to wrong "modulo" arithmetic in OP's following code. The product rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI is converted to an (8-bit) unsigned char which is a modulo 256, yet code is scaling tables and code by UCHAR_MAX (255). The last point of this answer details aspects of this, yet it is clear that tables and code should be use 256, not 255.

unsigned char radToIndex;
radToIndex=rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI; // wrong scaling
radToIndex=rad[i]*(UCHAR_MAX+1)/2/M_PI;  // right

Further, note OP's code has undefined behavior when radToIndex == UCHAR_MAX as that is an invalid index to int sini[UCHAR_MAX];.

Using above fix and 3 below fixes: table size 256, round index, round the value of sine, use double for table creation results in:

123*sin(2.000000) : 111.843584 , 112
123*sin(4.000000) : -93.086707 , -93
123*sin(6.000000) : -34.368106 , -35
123*sin(8.000000) : 121.691064 , 121
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -65
123*sin(-2.000000) : -111.843584 , -112
123*sin(-4.000000) : 93.086707 , 93
123*sin(-6.000000) : 34.368106 , 35
123*sin(-8.000000) : -121.691064 , -121
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 65

Code is also experiencing double rounding or more preciously: double truncation.

radToIndex=rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI; truncates toward 0. So the index is made smaller, not closest.

Table creation sini[i]=sinf(i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX)*MAGNIFICATION; also truncates toward 0. So the sini[] is made smaller, not closest int.

To improve, simply round to nearest with round().

sini[i] = (int) roundf(sinf(i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX)*MAGNIFICATION);
radToIndex= (int) round(rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI);

As a general note, since float is typically 24 bit precision and int likely 31+sign, use double for table creation for additional improvements.

sini[i] = (int) round(sin(i*2.0*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX)*MAGNIFICATION);

Further, recommend using UCHAR_MAX + 1 See BAM:

Off by 1.

the index of array becomes UCHAR_MAX, because it overflows, it automatically becomes 0

UCHAR_MAX is not overflow, UCHAR_MAX + 1 overflows and becomes 0. (unsigned char math)

int sini[UCHAR_MAX+1];
for (int i=0; i<(UCHAR_MAX+1); i++) {
  // Rather than `i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX`, use 
  sini[i]=sinf(i*2*M_PI/(UCHAR_MAX + 1))*MAGNIFICATION;
| improve this answer | |
  • Using doubleand sin() in table creation useful when MAGNIFICATION > 1e23. – chux - Reinstate Monica Aug 31 '15 at 5:42
0
0

Source of problem

It looks like you are getting errors from rounding of floating point numbers and assigning floating point numbers to an unsigned char.

The following program, adapted from your posted code, demonstrates how the index starts to deviate even after you round the floating point number.

#include <limits.h>
#include <math.h>

int sini[UCHAR_MAX];
int cosi[UCHAR_MAX];
double angle[UCHAR_MAX];


#define MAGNIFICATION 256
#define SIN(i) sini[i]/MAGNIFICATION
#define COS(i) cosi[i]/MAGNIFICATION

void initTable()
{
   double M_PI = 4.0*atan(1.0);
   for(int i=0;i<UCHAR_MAX;i++)
   {
      angle[i] = i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX;
      sini[i]=sinf(angle[i])*MAGNIFICATION;
      cosi[i]=cosf(angle[i])*MAGNIFICATION;
   }
}

#include <stdio.h>

void test3()
{
   int radToIndexInt;
   unsigned char radToIndexChar;
   float radTemp;
   float rad[]={2.0f,4.0f,6.0f,8.0f,10.0f,-2.0f,-4.0f,-6.0f,-8.0f,-10.0f};
   double M_PI = 4.0*atan(1.0);

   for(int i=0;i<sizeof(rad)/sizeof(float);i++)
   {
      radTemp = rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI;
      radToIndexInt = round(radTemp);
      radToIndexInt %= UCHAR_MAX;
      if ( radToIndexInt < 0 )
      {
         radToIndexInt += UCHAR_MAX;
      }

      radToIndexChar = round(radTemp);

      printf("radToIndexInt: %d, radToIndexChar: %d\n",
             radToIndexInt, radToIndexChar);

   }
}

int main()
{
   initTable();

   test3();

   return 0;
}

Output of the above program:

radToIndexInt: 81, radToIndexChar: 81
radToIndexInt: 162, radToIndexChar: 162
radToIndexInt: 244, radToIndexChar: 244
radToIndexInt: 70, radToIndexChar: 69
radToIndexInt: 151, radToIndexChar: 150
radToIndexInt: 174, radToIndexChar: 175
radToIndexInt: 93, radToIndexChar: 94
radToIndexInt: 11, radToIndexChar: 12
radToIndexInt: 185, radToIndexChar: 187
radToIndexInt: 104, radToIndexChar: 106

Solution

By using

  radToIndex=round(radTemp);
  radToIndex %= UCHAR_MAX;
  if ( radToIndex < 0 )
  {
     radToIndex += UCHAR_MAX;
  }

to compute the index, I get very close answers:

Here's a program, once again adapted from your posted code, demonstrates that using the above logic works.

#include <limits.h>
#include <math.h>

int sini[UCHAR_MAX];
int cosi[UCHAR_MAX];
double angle[UCHAR_MAX];


#define MAGNIFICATION 256
#define SIN(i) sini[i]/MAGNIFICATION
#define COS(i) cosi[i]/MAGNIFICATION

void initTable()
{
   double M_PI = 4.0*atan(1.0);
   for(int i=0;i<UCHAR_MAX;i++)
   {
      angle[i] = i*2*M_PI/UCHAR_MAX;
      sini[i]=sinf(angle[i])*MAGNIFICATION;
      cosi[i]=cosf(angle[i])*MAGNIFICATION;
   }
}

#include <stdio.h>

void test2()
{
   int radToIndex;
   float radTemp;
   int scalar=123;
   float rad[]={0.01f,0.1f,1.0f,10.0f,100.0f,1000.0f,-0.01f,-0.1f,-1.0f,-10.0f,-100.0f,-1000.0f};
   double M_PI = 4.0*atan(1.0);

   printf("scalar=%d\n",scalar);
   for(int i=0;i<sizeof(rad)/sizeof(float);i++)
   {
      radTemp = rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI;
      radToIndex=round(radTemp);
      radToIndex %= UCHAR_MAX;
      if ( radToIndex < 0 )
      {
         radToIndex += UCHAR_MAX;
      }
      printf("%d*sin(%f) : %f , %d\n",
             scalar,rad[i],scalar*sinf(rad[i]),scalar*SIN(radToIndex));

   }
}

void test1()
{
   int radToIndex;
   float radTemp;
   int scalar=123;
   float rad[]={2.0f,4.0f,6.0f,8.0f,10.0f,-2.0f,-4.0f,-6.0f,-8.0f,-10.0f};
   double M_PI = 4.0*atan(1.0);

   printf("scalar=%d\n",scalar);
   for(int i=0;i<sizeof(rad)/sizeof(float);i++)
   {
      radTemp = rad[i]*UCHAR_MAX/2/M_PI;
      radToIndex=round(radTemp);
      radToIndex %= UCHAR_MAX;
      if ( radToIndex < 0 )
      {
         radToIndex += UCHAR_MAX;
      }
      printf("%d*sin(%f) : %f , %d\n",
             scalar,rad[i],scalar*sinf(rad[i]),scalar*SIN(radToIndex));

   }
}

int main()
{
   initTable();

   test1();
   test2();

   return 0;
}

Output:

scalar=123
123*sin(2.000000) : 111.843582 , 111
123*sin(4.000000) : -93.086708 , -92
123*sin(6.000000) : -34.368107 , -32
123*sin(8.000000) : 121.691063 , 121
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -67
123*sin(-2.000000) : -111.843582 , -111
123*sin(-4.000000) : 93.086708 , 92
123*sin(-6.000000) : 34.368107 , 32
123*sin(-8.000000) : -121.691063 , -121
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 67
scalar=123
123*sin(0.010000) : 1.229980 , 0
123*sin(0.100000) : 12.279510 , 12
123*sin(1.000000) : 103.500931 , 103
123*sin(10.000000) : -66.914597 , -67
123*sin(100.000000) : -62.282974 , -63
123*sin(1000.000000) : 101.706184 , 102
123*sin(-0.010000) : -1.229980 , 0
123*sin(-0.100000) : -12.279510 , -12
123*sin(-1.000000) : -103.500931 , -103
123*sin(-10.000000) : 66.914597 , 67
123*sin(-100.000000) : 62.282974 , 63
123*sin(-1000.000000) : -101.706184 , -102
| improve this answer | |

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