5

I'd like to use Dependency Injection in a scenario where I have to inject resources into GUI-controls. As that might be the wrong Place, I have some reasons to do it here and not in a view model (eg. I need Window handles and such).

Constructor parameter injection seems to be the preferred way. As most of you know WPF controls must have a parameter-less constructors, otherwise the XAML does not work and for the current scenario I love to keep my XAML since it contains some name registrations and bindings.

So: How can I use constructor-DI in a WPF+XAML scenario and (if possible in the case of Simple Injector)?

Does a Markup extension exist or can the XAML parser be made Container-Aware and accept parameter-having constructors as controls?

Scheme example:

<Grid>
 <gg:WhateverResourceNeedingViewer ItemSource={Binding Items}/>
</Grid>

And:

public class WhateverResourceNeedingViewer : ItemsControl
{
   public WhateverResourceNeedingViewer(Dep1 d, DepResource d2)
   {
   ...
   }
...
}
  • 1
    See the integration guide here – qujck Aug 31 '15 at 10:02
  • I saw that. But does it solve my intent? Actually I have a second window I want to populate. But do I have to give up my XAML due to the fact that I can't instantiate a control from XAML? (because of lack of the 0-ctor) – Robetto Aug 31 '15 at 11:41
  • Do you have some code that is not working or is this a theoretical question? – qujck Aug 31 '15 at 13:45
  • Do you use some kind of MVVM framework? – Ric .Net Sep 1 '15 at 6:55
  • No MVVM framework (haven't really looked). The question is quite concrete - With the scratch-example it will not compile but I can't find a way around it that preserves my xaml (could do ContentPresenter+Style, however pushes forward a problem) . – Robetto Sep 1 '15 at 20:45
6

It is good practice to not only build your viewmodels using the SOLID design principles but to do this in your views also. The usage of usercontrols can help you with this.

Downside of the approach you're suggesting, if technically possible, is that this design will violate SRP and OCP.

SRP because all dependencies your usercontrol needs must be injected in the consuming window/view while this view probably does not need (all of) these dependencies.

And OCP because every you add or delete a dependency from your usercontrol you also need to add or delete this from the consuming window/view.

With usercontrols you're able to compose the view just as you compose your other classes like services, command- and queryhandlers, etc. When it comes to dependency injection the place for composing your application is the composition root

ContentControls in WPF are all about 'composing' your view from other 'content' in your application.

A MVVM tool like Caliburn Micro typically uses contentcontrols to inject a usercontrol view (read: xaml without code behind) with it's own viewmodel. As a matter of fact, when using a MVVM you would build all views in the application from the usercontrols class, as a best practice.

This could look something like this:

public interface IViewModel<T> { }

public class MainViewModel : IViewModel<Someclass>
{
    public MainViewModel(IViewModel<SomeOtherClass> userControlViewModel)
    {
        this.UserControlViewModel = userControlViewModel;
    }

    public IViewModel<SomeOtherClass> UserControlViewModel { get; private set; }
}

public class UserControlViewModel : IViewModel<SomeOtherClass>
{
    private readonly ISomeService someDependency;

    public UserControlViewModel(ISomeService someDependency)
    {
        this.someDependency = someDependency;
    }
}

And the XAML for the MainView:

// MainView
<UserControl x:Class="WpfUserControlTest.MainView"
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <Grid>
        <ContentControl Name="UserControlViewModel" />
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

// UserControl View
<UserControl x:Class="WpfUserControlTest.UserControlView"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <Grid>
        <TextBlock Text="SomeInformation"/>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

The result will be that the MainView is displayed in a window where the DataContext of that window is set to the MainViewModel. The contentcontrol will be filled with the UserControlView with its DataContext set to the UserControlViewModel class. This automagically happens because the MVVM tool will bind the viewmodels to corresponding views using Convention over configuration.

If you don't use a MVVM tool but directly inject your dependencies in the code behind of your window class you simply can follow the same pattern. Use a ContentControl in your view, just as the above example and inject the UserControl (with a constructor containing parameters as you wish) in the constructor of the window. Then just set the Content property of the ContentControl to the injected instance of your UserControl.

That would look like:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow(YourUserControl userControl)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        // assuming you have a contentcontrol named 'UserControlViewModel' 
        this.UserControlViewModel.Content = userControl;
    }

    // other code...
}
  • 1
    Just to add a small comment to Ric's excellent answer is that I've had excellent success using User Controls injected in to "MainWindows" (which are only shells, of content controls, not user controls). The content control allows injection of just about anything but by separating concerns "this user control only does this ...or that" and adding multiple controls that can even be joined into even another user control you have the ability to pick and choose parts you want to use at run time based on user interaction. Prism did this. User controls are excellent containers for DI of Views. – John Peters Sep 1 '15 at 21:06
  • 1
    @johnpeters that's exactly the way I use user controls and the result of implementing my answer to the fullest of its ability. With caliburn and simple injector you even inject open generic 'UserControlViewModels' with a runtime bound single or closed generic specific view. The possibilities are almost endless. – Ric .Net Sep 1 '15 at 21:56
  • That is an excellent post and it basically renders my question to be answered with NO. Basically what I expected - there was still and still is hope. But you're telling that the ContentControl is the actual hook to do composition on the UI-side as well. I have seen this already and now it looks to me as the way to go. However my problem is still unsolved, because my problem sort of abuses WPF. I do use WinFormsHost and a own, more restricted object hierarchy inside. So ContentControl is impossible meanwhile WPF-DC boundaries also apply. Seems like I have to give up on my XAML-approach there. – Robetto Sep 2 '15 at 21:57
0

This may be considered an anti-pattern - on a number of levels - (see Ric's answer for details) but if you just want to get this working, wish to be pragmatic and have a simple use-case, I would suggest a static DI resolver. This comes in super handy for legacy components or situations like this where one is constrained by the underlying architecture.

/// <summary>
///     Provides static resolution of Simple Injector instances.
/// </summary>
public class ServiceResolver
{
    private Container Container { get; }
    private static ServiceResolver Resolver { get; set; }

    public ServiceResolver(Container container)
    {
        Container = container;
        Resolver = this;
    }

    public static T GetInstance<T>()
    {
        if (Resolver == null) throw new InvalidOperationException($"{nameof(ServiceResolver)} must be constructed prior to use.");
        return (T) Resolver.Container.GetInstance(typeof(T));
    }
}

Usage, from your example:

public WhateverResourceNeedingViewer()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    // Resolve view model statically to fulfill no-arg constructor for controls
    DataContext = ServiceResolver.GetInstance<DepResource>();
}

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