6

In the method below, when an exception is thrown in the TRY block, it is being swallowed. How can I make it throw the exception so that it gets written to log in the catch block? The log writer works fine. Thanks!

public static bool MonitorQueueEmptyTask(string queueName, CancellationTokenSource tokenSource)
{
    try
    {
        Task<bool> task = Task.Factory.StartNew<bool>(() =>
        {
            while (!QueueManager.IsQueueEmpty(queueName))
            {
                if (tokenSource.IsCancellationRequested)
                {                            
                    break;
                }

                Thread.Sleep(5000);
                throw new Exception("Throwing an error!"); //THIS THROW IS SWALLOWED -- NO LOG WRITTEN ON CATCH
            };

            return true;

        }, tokenSource.Token);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {   
        WriteExceptionToLog(ex.Stack); //it's not that this method doesn't work. it works fine.

        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
5
  • 3
    MSDN - How to: Handle Exceptions Thrown by Tasks – D Stanley Aug 31 '15 at 16:23
  • Could you place try/catch in the task block? – IS4 Aug 31 '15 at 16:27
  • This can't work because the task might not have completed when the outer thread exits the try. – usr Aug 31 '15 at 16:38
  • Thanks all! Tried catching AggregateException, tried Moving the try/catch inside. Aggregate catch doesn;t work, and moving the try inside works, BUT the logging ONLY HAPPENS after debugging is done. I have this set: <ThrowUnobservedTaskExceptions enabled="true"/> in config, apparently that's supposed to force the throw when debugging. It doesn't. – A.G. Aug 31 '15 at 16:49
  • I should add, this is a looong running method, I can't do WAIT. It's kinda like fire and forget and let it do its thing, but throw if necessary. – A.G. Aug 31 '15 at 16:51
6

If you want to fire and forget, you can attach a continuation using ContinueWith. The current try-catch will not help you at all, as the exception is encapsulated inside the Task. If this is "fire and forget", than you can log the exception:

public static Task MonitorQueueEmptyTask(
                         string queueName, CancellationTokenSource tokenSource)
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew<bool>(() =>
    {
        while (!QueueManager.IsQueueEmpty(queueName))
        {
            if (tokenSource.IsCancellationRequested)
            {                            
                break;
            }

            Thread.Sleep(5000);
            throw new Exception("Throwing an error!");
        };
    }, tokenSource.Token, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning).ContinueWith(faultedTask =>
    {
        WriteExceptionToLog(faultedTask.Exception); 
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted); 
}

This, in turn, will not propagate the exception after it's thrown, but will provide a mechanism to log the error. If you want the exception to be properly handled, you can register to TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException. Additionally, you can set ThrowUnobservedTaskExceptions enabled="true" in your configuration if you want unhandled exceptions to terminate your application. ContinueWith will consider the exception "handled" once you look at the task.Exception property.

3
  • Good note that you must specifically access the task.Exception property for the exception to be considered handled. – Craig Jan 17 '17 at 20:14
  • Docs say that setting enabled true on ThrowUnobservedTaskExceptions "Terminates the running process for an unhandled task exception.". Is it unnecessary here? – Vimes Mar 17 '20 at 22:34
  • @Vimes Only if you want exceptions to terminate if unhandled, otherwise no. Reworded for clarity. – Yuval Itzchakov Mar 18 '20 at 6:41
2

The exception is not swallowed; it's just that it doesn't occur on the thread that executes the try/catch block, but on the separate Task thread.

If you don't observe the task's result or exception, when the task is eventually garbage collected, it will throw an exception saying that the task was not observed. Unless you catch that by handling the TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException, it will crash the process.

0

I also had a problem with this, and i really dislike the whole idea of App.config, so can provide another solution to prevent the exceptions disappearing :)

Save the exception then throw it after the Task.Run has completed, e.g.

private async void Function() {
    Exception save_exception = null;

    await Task.Run(() => {
        try {
            // Do Stuff
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            save_exception = ex;
        }
    }).ContinueWith(new Action<Task>(task => {
        if (save_exception != null)
            throw save_exception;

        // Do Stuff 
    }));
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.